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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 505–506.
Published: 01 December 1946
... of the bibliography of seventeenth-century drama. Under Congreve, for instance, five issues of The Old Batchelour in 1693 are recorded (compared with four in CBEL), four editions of Love for Love in 1695 (as against two in CBEL), and three editions of The Mourn- ing Bride in 1697 (as against two in CBEL...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 504–505.
Published: 01 December 1948
... has admirably charted the various cross-currents of the age. At the same time he has shown that men of good will, despite serious disagreements, can keep lighted the lamp of tolerance. MAURICEJ. QUINLAN Lehigh University Four Plays by Holberg...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 309–312.
Published: 01 September 1979
... on the “other side.of the Channel” but also across the Irish Sea and even a few oceans. ROBERTJ. ELLRICH University of Washington Blake’s “Four Zoas”: The Design of a Dream. By BRIANWILKIE and MARYLYNN JOHNSON.Cambridge, Mass., and London...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 342–361.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Eugenia DeLamotte Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 DISSONANCE AND RESOLUTION IN FOUR QUARETS By EUGENIADELAMOTTE Readers who prefer the early to the later T. S. Eliot often find in Four Quartets a sign...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 342–361.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Eugenia DeLamotte Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 DISSONANCE AND RESOLUTION IN FOUR QUARETS By EUGENIADELAMOTTE Readers who prefer the early to the later T. S. Eliot often find in Four Quartets a sign...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 508–522.
Published: 01 December 1969
...Elliot H. Tokson Copyright © 1969 by Duke University Press 1969 THE IMAGE OF THE NEGRO IN FOUR SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY LOVE POEMS By ELLIOTH. TOKSON The question of the function of creative literature in the early cul- tural...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (1): 41–45.
Published: 01 March 1962
...David Perkins Copyright © 1962 by Duke University Press 1962 ROSE GARDEN TO MIDWINTER SPRING ACHIEVED FAITH IN THE FOUR QUARTETS By DAVID PERKINS This paper contrasts two passages in the Four Quartets-the moment in the rose garden...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 211–213.
Published: 01 June 1963
....” It also includes an appendix on various minor characters, a substantial bibliography, and an index of proper names and topics. JOHN M. STEADMAN Hunting ton Library O’Neill and His Plays: Four Decades of Criticism. Edited by OSCARCARCILL...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (1): 40–61.
Published: 01 March 1965
...Willard Thorp Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 EXODUS: FOUR DECADES OF AMERICAN LITERARY SCHOLARSHIP By WILLARDTHORP Before we can turn to present trends and recent achievements in the field of American...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (2): 186–189.
Published: 01 June 1989
... price and, except for pushing the notes to the back, produced the book impeccably. STEPHENA. BARNEY University of California, Imine Four Middle English Mystery Cycles: Textual, Contextual, and Critical Interpretations. By MARTINSTEVENS...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 197–206.
Published: 01 June 1963
... Oppel of the University of Marburg. The collection, dedicated to Professor Oppel, throws the capabilities and limitations of the comparative method into high and some- times comic relief. Four of the articles are notable additions to criticism. Fabian Gudas leads off with a vigorous...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (1): 51–76.
Published: 01 March 2017
...: the melodrama of his father’s generation and the melodramatic-cum-realistic Broadway fare of his own youth. Textual history has impeded their categorical recognition: in 1924, when Desire under the Elms was first published and performed, 39 percent of O’Neill’s oeuvre (seventeen of forty-four plays), but just...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 97–116.
Published: 01 March 2009
... that celebrated Roman conquests. For four hundred years the acting profession was constituted almost exclusively with victims of foreign wars. The same holds for the writers of the “golden age” of Roman comedy. This essay considers the genocidal memory of one survivor, the playwright Terence, brought to Rome from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 297–319.
Published: 01 September 2016
... them. The essay also identifies and discusses four techniques basic to literary criticism: description, interpretation, explanation, and evaluation. A coda speculates about the links between Mimesis and a visual technology introduced into university lecturing a few decades before Auerbach wrote his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (4): 443–464.
Published: 01 December 2023
... history and became a focal point for emerging ideas about authenticity and the educative impact of the replica in the Weimar Republic. Even as the intelligentsia were publicly quarreling over the epistemological stakes of the facsimile, four nuns at Eibingen Abbey were meticulously hand-copying the most...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2024) 85 (2): 151–176.
Published: 01 June 2024
... stage in their history to recover their forgotten political significance. Working across four central cases (Samuel Richardson’s “man of feeling” Sir Charles Grandison, Charlotte Smith’s self-effacing protagonist Lionel Desmond, Walter Scott’s “mediocre heroes,” and Jane Austen’s “creepmouse” heroine...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Figure 1. Vertebrate endoskeletons. Plate 1 of Owen 1849 : 120. Owen’s vertebrate archetype is illustrated at the top right; the rest of the plate shows, Owen explains, “the modifications of [the archetype] characteristic of the four great divisions of the vertebrate subkingdom, viz. fishes More
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Published: 01 September 2021
Figure 2. Ulysses , episodes 1–4. A sample longest path (network diameter) runs along the four-sided nodes (beginning at H. B.-Price and ending at the constable). Dashed lines represent written communication; dotted lines represent past interactions; dash-dotted lines represent imagined More
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Published: 01 September 2021
Figure 1. Installments 1–2 (chaps. 1–7) of Bleak House . The longest network diameter connects the four-sided nodes (beginning at Lady Dedlock and ending at Mr. Swallow). The dashed line represents written communication. Bracketed characters have had interactions but not yet been identified More
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Published: 01 September 2021
Figure 4. The Wire , season 1, episode 8. A sample longest path (network diameter) runs along the four-sided nodes (beginning with Wallace and ending with Burrell). Here and in all other figures, node size is proportionate to betweenness centrality. The thickness of each line corresponds More