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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (3): 413–418.
Published: 01 September 1999
...: The Functions of Criticism in Our Time. By Jonathan Arac. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997. ix t 254 pp. $39.95 cloth, $17.95 paper. Although Jonathan Arac maintains that he is not an Americanist, “Huckle- berry Finn” as Idol and Target captures with startling accuracy a recurring ele...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (2): 157–177.
Published: 01 June 1983
...?’ “FREE AND EASY”? SPONTANEITY AND THE QUEST FOR MATURITY IN THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN2 By R. J. FERTEL At the heart of Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn con- tradictory assessments of spontaneity’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 206–207.
Published: 01 June 1977
...Kenneth A. Requa George C. Carrington, Jr., Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1976. xviii + 201 pp. $12.00. Copyright © 1977 by Duke University Press 1977 206 KEVIEWS The Dra~nniicUnity of “Hzickleberry Finn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 253–256.
Published: 01 September 1963
...Roy Harvey Pearce Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 “THE END. YOURS TRULY, HUCK FINN” POSTSCRIPT By ROYHARVEY PEARCE In the last chapter of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck speaks twice of going...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 378–385.
Published: 01 December 1988
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (1): 87–90.
Published: 01 March 1990
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 333–361.
Published: 01 September 2006
... film version of The Magic Toyshop (1988), while Jouve suggests another modernist connection in the novel, a link between the character Finn (both in his name and in his archetypal actions) and James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. On Carter as a problematic feminist see Elaine Jordan, “The Dangers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 199–202.
Published: 01 June 1941
...Alan S. C. Ross ∗ Abbreviations . BF.—Baltic Fennic; E.—English; Est.—Estonian; Finn.—Finnish; Gmc.—Germanic; Icel.—Icelandic; IndE.—Indoeuropean; Ir.—Irish; Kar.—Karelian; Lat.—Latin; Lett.—Lettish; Lith.—Lithuanian; Liv.—Livonian; NKar.—Northern Karelian; Russ.—Russian; Skt.—Sanskrit; WN...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 327–332.
Published: 01 June 1965
... of honest effort.” Tom Sawyer’s dream is “to dis- cover buried treasure, to perform a self-sacrificial act for love of his beloved, to save a life, to triumph over his enemy.” In Huckleberry Finn, Huck “searches for an ideal society founded upon the freedom that grows out of moral responsibility...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 207–210.
Published: 01 June 1977
... of this book will find most to object to. A few interpretations strike me as “stretchers,” and I suspect most readers who know Huckleberry Finn well would find others. For example, Carrington argues that “Huck makes Jim pay and pay” (p. 41) for pressuring Huck to remain loyal; and he asserts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 287–358.
Published: 01 June 2000
... Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Twain parodies Dumas specifically as well as the whole line of pretender novels. He evokes, kills, reinstates, and kills again embodiments of the pretender, providing, finally, the wispi- est traces of the melancholic royal claimant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 363–371.
Published: 01 December 1952
... still magnifi- cently crescent2--except that the “crudeness” of Huckleberry Finn gave offense in certain refined quartens Cable, too, was a person of note. He had printed all of his best fiction: Old Creole Days, The Grandissimes, and Madame Delphine. New England, approving...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 209–219.
Published: 01 June 1970
... to the dictates of his own nature. The Yankee’s most famous philosophical oration denies that a Huck Finn could exist: r-.1 raining--training is everything; training is all there is to a person. We speak of nature; it is folly; there is no such thing as nature; what we call...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (3): 284–302.
Published: 01 September 1978
.... Phineas Finn loved, or thought he loved, many women before his final union-and second marriage-with Marie Goesler; yet his love for her is perfectly valid and satisfactol-y-though he is the only man she has ever truly loved, and she too has been mar- ried before. Mabel puts the contrast...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (4): 403–404.
Published: 01 December 1976
... the article may tell us something a little sur- prising about that era of hard-nosed historical scholarship, especially since it was John Livingston Lowes at whom the neophyte was taking dead aim. But more to the point is the Huck Finn ironic innocence with which we are The third...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (2): 157–172.
Published: 01 June 1974
... that modern American literature begins with Huckleberry Finn, though the emphasis this receives is generally that Twain’s achievement was the discovery of the vernacular. Actually, the vernacular had been employed for at least the previous sixty years as a staple of American humor. (In the 1840s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 December 1949
... and conflict, and which in turn influenced the chronicles (especially the melodramatic incidents in The French Chronicle of London). By the way, this chronicle got the wrong Queen Eleanor, though it was hardly as genially befuddled as Huck Finn’s notion that Henry VIII ordered Jane Shore...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 532–533.
Published: 01 December 1949
...,” which was more ready to assign motives and conflict, and which in turn influenced the chronicles (especially the melodramatic incidents in The French Chronicle of London). By the way, this chronicle got the wrong Queen Eleanor, though it was hardly as genially befuddled as Huck Finn’s notion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 291–298.
Published: 01 December 1955
... that flet could serve as a kenning (synecdoche) for Finn’s and Offa’s halls (1086, 1949) .8 2 Ofer has been discussed in “The Unity of Beowulf,” PMLA, XLIX (1934), 404, note 46. Unferb seems to look toward the roof to see the strange fingers. Both he and Hrobgar see the hand, rather...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 259–262.
Published: 01 September 1968
..., the motive on the part of the father seems political, and the daughter is married off to a prominent member of another tribe. Such it is with Healfdene’s daughter, who is married to Onela the Swede; the Half-Dane Hildeburh, who marries Finn, king of the Frisians; Hrothgar’s daughter, Freawaru, who...