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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 256–274.
Published: 01 September 1979
...William H. Galperin Copyright © 1979 by Duke University Press 1979 “TURNS AND COUNTER-TURNS” THE CRISIS OF SINCERITY IN THE FINAL BOOKS OF THE PRELUDE By WILLIAMH. GALPERIN In the middle of Book 11...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (4): 415–417.
Published: 01 December 1979
... of Bolton’s excellent survey of Alcuin’s literary ideas, we are finally asked to prefer Alcuin as critic to the perceptive close read- ers of our own time, we might have to side with the following assessment by E. D. Hirsch: It must be said further that the pursuit of [the New Critics...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Tim Armstrong Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 FINAL GESTURES B’ B’ TIMARMSTRONG As he was lying on his deathbed, Thomas Hardy dictated two angry squibs about his enemies George Moore and G. K. Chester- ton. The poems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Tim Armstrong Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 FINAL GESTURES B’ B’ TIMARMSTRONG As he was lying on his deathbed, Thomas Hardy dictated two angry squibs about his enemies George Moore and G. K. Chester- ton. The poems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (3): 239–260.
Published: 01 September 1975
...John C. Coldewey Copyright © 1975 by Duke University Press 1975 THE LAST RISE AND FINAL DEMISE OF ESSEX TOWN DRAMA By JOHN C. COLDEWEY Cause and effect are often difficult to distinguish. Such is the dilem- ma...
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Figure 2. The conclusion of “seven Sonnets in a Sequence,” with numbering that drops out in the final two poems, A Hundreth sundrie Flowres , sigs. 2X1v–2X2r. By permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library. Figure 2. The conclusion of “seven Sonnets in a Sequence,” with numbering that drops More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (4): 441–463.
Published: 01 December 2013
... reconciliation of father and daughter, as, also tragically, does the final action between Gertrude and Hamlet when she wipes his forehead, fulfilling his promise that “when you are desirous to be blessed, / I’ll blessing beg of you.” The blessing of marriage between Hamlet and Ophelia exposes another abruption...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (3): 391–412.
Published: 01 September 2013
... sensibility (as apprehended in Woolf’s 1925 Common Reader essay, “The Russian Point of View”), but this congruence was intensified during extensive final revisions, begun in typescript just after Woolf had viewed a production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters in late October 1925. Woolf’s purposeful assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (1): 57–75.
Published: 01 March 2014
... appears as “The Century’s End 1899 1900”; in the periodical the Graphic , it is implicitly the issue’s date of publication, December 29, 1900; in Poems of the Past and the Present (1901), it is “December 1900”; and, finally, in The Collected Poems (1919), it takes its canonical form, “31 December 1900...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (3): 349–375.
Published: 01 September 2020
..., stages the interplay of his wide-ranging literary and philosophical influences. Drawing on figures such as Arthur Schopenhauer, Jean Racine, Henri Bergson, Arnold Geulincx, and Fritz Mauthner, the play bends toward tragedy but undercuts any sense of finality with its slow unrolling. More than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (2): 201–224.
Published: 01 June 2015
... as an anticlimactic avoidance of the bind of desire. If desire drives beyond any terms in which its target can be represented, what compels William Langland is finally the unrelenting character of the demands to which the subject can never be adequate. Copyright © 2015 by University of Washington 2015 sin...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 42–52.
Published: 01 March 1963
... and the final version of the ode.2 Many critics have commented upon the poor organization of the final poem, but many others have praised the poem’s aesthetic unity- for a rather varied set of reasons. One critic found unity through the illuminating symbolism of the green light. Another...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
... we use [ae:] where Reed has /e/. (See IV, 12.) (3) We use I where Reed uses /a (See VIII.) (4) We use [a] where Reed uses /e/. This we justify not only on the grounds that it is phonetically more accurate, but also because [el sometimes occurs in final unaccented position...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 113–114.
Published: 01 March 1943
... the sounding of final -e before a vowel-beginning word, or, vice versa, the silenc- ing of the -e before a consonant. These exceptions have been care- fully set forth in the systematically arranged “Demonstration” which constitutes the major part of this book, and are restricted to modern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 323–335.
Published: 01 December 1977
...- such interpretations are unsatisfying to me. If there is no transcendent pattern of meaning in the universe of Shakespearean tragedy, what distinguishes the tragic from pathos on one hand and absurdity on the other? The difference, I think, lies in the man-made significance created by the hero’s final...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (4): 439–449.
Published: 01 December 1968
... and objective normalcy. We move from Benjy’s confused sensations to Quentin’s twisted obsessiveness, to Jason’s “logical rational contained”2 literalness, and finally to the ob- jective, omniscient third-person narration of the last section. The char- acter dominating but not narrating this last section...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (1): 91–94.
Published: 01 March 1961
... because of the differing drafts of individual poems and because of the many rough or semi-final drafts in which no choice has been indicated among the variants clustered around the margins and between the lines. Though there will inevitably be continuing scholarly quibbling about the choice...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 47–67.
Published: 01 March 1976
..., which also epitomize the doubts of his age. These appear sporadically in the first half of the poem, most notably in sections 54-56. They in- creasingly dominate the last part of In Memoriam. Their final resolu- tion is less a form of psychological catharsis than of intellectual...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 158–166.
Published: 01 June 1961
... of a belief on the mind by a consistent effort of will-began to rise. Both were to acquire great, though never decisive, importance for Ganivet, Unamuno, and Bar0ja, in all of whom there tends to prevail a certain pessimism with regard to the related problems of death, finality, and the power...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (3): 449–477.
Published: 01 September 1996
... consciousness, but also to fetch as profit, revenue, also again to recant or retract. The Classical Top 40 The finales of multimovement classical compositions sometimes reprise material introduced in earlier movements. Musical aesthetics familiarly regards this technique as a source or sign...