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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1978) 39 (4): 405–407.
Published: 01 December 1978
...RICHARD STRIER HARDY BARBARA. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1977. 142 pp. $10.95. Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 REVIEWS The Advantage of Lyric: Essays on Feeling in Poetry. By BARBARAHARDY. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1977. 142...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1956) 17 (4): 375–376.
Published: 01 December 1956
... and Feeling. By WILLIAMROSE. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, 1956. Pp. vii + 163. $2.90. Taking as his motto Heine’s remark in Die romontische Sckule, “die zwei wichtigsten Verhaltnisse des Menschen, das politische und das religiijse . Professor Rose has. written two extremely...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2009) 70 (4): 542–545.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Susan S. Lanser Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History . By Heather Love. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. 196 pp. University of Washington 2009 Susan S. Lanser is professor of English, comparative literature, and women's and gender studies at Brandeis University...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... freedom. To assert some degree of social and political freedom depends on attaining freedom from thoughts and feelings that block free action. Hamlet probes the early modern semantic range of free and its cognates, which could denote sociopolitical status, on the one hand, and aspects of moral character...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2018) 79 (4): 397–419.
Published: 01 December 2018
... temptation to regard all lyric poems as first-person expressions of subjective feeling. Both Swinburne and Tennyson wrote lyrics that recall “Westron Wynde” and “A Lyke-Wake Dirge.” Swinburne, who edited a projected collection of old northern ballads in the early 1860s, at about the same time composed “A...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2018) 79 (4): 355–372.
Published: 01 December 2018
..., persons possess. 22 “Man” is but “a reasonable creature”; the “Booke, . . . reason it selfe, . . . the Image of God, as it were in the eye” (4). A meaning being, free of flesh, a meaning being working feeling in flesh, the text is writing itself complete; the text is reading itself complete. This...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2018) 79 (4): 421–444.
Published: 01 December 2018
... of modern French thought does not prop up such fantasies of transcendence. Instead, as the feeling tone of inescapable immanence, French disgust has a strange beauty, a disturbing appeal. It is the atmosphere proper to an irrecuperably impure world. I am grateful to Annabel L. Kim and Sarah Ann Wells...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 175–181.
Published: 01 June 1944
... recognize that vital poetry must be rooted deeply in the life of mankind; poetry is not the property of cults. Since the poet bases his work on the life common to mankind, it is inevitable that he should emphasize the element of feeling, for feeling is the tie that binds mankind together. The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 278–279.
Published: 01 September 1960
... everything, even the obvious, has not helped him avoid the pitfalls inherent in the original conception of his book and in his approach to his subject. Thus, when we get to the last page, we are left with a sense of disappointment, of frustration ; we feel that the real Leopardi escapes us. Some...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1957) 18 (1): 27–34.
Published: 01 March 1957
... subtle appraisals of feeling. Nevertheless, to some extent unformalized feeling is inev- itable. The lyric poem is a more univocal form than the drama; its unity at its best is concentrated and introverted, a unity of thought and feeling inextricable, of thought continuously motivating feeling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1990) 51 (1): 44–62.
Published: 01 March 1990
... carry more serious consequence than Mr. Toots’s manner of dealing with the world. The second of these unpleasant ways-resen tment-is the focus of this essay. According to Eric Gans, the notion of resentment posits a self and an other along with the feelings the self bears toward that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1965) 26 (4): 614–615.
Published: 01 December 1965
... have solutions vouchsafed to her that will not be granted to scholars who make deliberate and rational aggressions on the truth. It is because the ballads admit one into “an archaic world of feeling,” pre-Christian, pre-Calvin, pre-industrial, that Muir principally values them. She...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1948) 9 (2): 131–134.
Published: 01 June 1948
... straightforward man- ner? Was he as perpetually cramped and cautious as he appears to be in the “narrative” chapters of his Evangel Harmony? If he feels compelled to elucidate as well as to narrate the events of the Vulgate he is rendering, can we expect him to exhibit those personal qualities or that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 279–280.
Published: 01 September 1960
... often relates merely the titles; yet these are not only helpful, but revealing to the student who is interested in the genesis and history of Leopardi’s ideas and feelings. Aside from all this, and within its narrow scope, Wis’s biography is accurate. The external facts are there, and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1963) 24 (1): 79–87.
Published: 01 March 1963
... ethical thought and feeling; and ethics involves ideas other than that of happiness (even in the eighteenth century). Some of these are treated here, and some are not. Consequently, one misses several of the deep clashes of cultural significance : clashes between the political anti- theses...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1994) 55 (4): 415–427.
Published: 01 December 1994
...’’ speaking, as any eighteenth-century reader could tell you. The mysterious stranger had to be intimately related to Roderick; such strong instinctual feelings always signaled consanguinity. Even when separated at birth, parents and children, brothers and sisters knew when they came into each...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1984) 45 (3): 295–297.
Published: 01 September 1984
... object of the first simile therefore parallels the subject of the next. The apparent balance is actually an opposition, yet Milton’s provocation of the reader to elicit structural harmony from the simile persists: and the question of how to reconcile this feeling of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1962) 23 (3): 263–271.
Published: 01 September 1962
... suddenly grasp his ideas, but rather comes to feel comfortable with a poem which had at first teased and annoyed while it charmed, and whose meaning is the last of its pleasures. It is through a consistent symbolism and a simple but ef- fective myth that the meaning takes form. A symbol in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2011) 72 (2): 225–252.
Published: 01 June 2011
... issues. Eliot also saw Laforgue demonstrating “how much more use poetry could make of contemporary ideas and feelings, of the emo- tional quality of contemporary ideas, than one had supposed.”2 Pur- suing the question of Laforgue’s example therefore leads us beyond technical issues in two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 369.
Published: 01 September 1948
... of novel-writing.” Swinburne, who can al- ways be depended upon, pronounced it “exquisitely comical and con- scientiously coxcombical.” Professor Booth feels that its readers will always be held by “a warm sense of the irreproachable integrity of the author,” and Professor Booth is right...