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etymology

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (4): 346–362.
Published: 01 December 1980
...William G. Karanikolas Copyright © 1980 by Duke University Press 1980 SAMUEL JOHNSON AND THE ORIGIN OF MORALE A HYPOTHETICAL ETYMOLOGY By WILLIAMG. KARANIKOLAS It is not as easy as it once was to confuse...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 149–160.
Published: 01 June 1945
...Yakov Malkiel Copyright © 1945 by Duke University Press 1945 THE ETYMOLOGY OF OLD SPANISH APESGAR “TO CATCH, TO PRESS, TO WEIGH” By YAKOVMALKIEL I Spanish apesgar, chiefly known as a synonym...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 219–227.
Published: 01 June 1944
...Charles H. Livingston Copyright © 1944 by Duke University Press 1944 FRENCH ETYMOLOGICAL NOTES Old French masculine entire; French sou, seu By CHARLESH. LIVINGSTON It is generally accepted that Latin inte'grum developed by per- fectly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (3): 233–259.
Published: 01 September 2019
...Robert Hudson Vincent Abstract As many scholars, including the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary , continue to cite false etymologies of the baroque, this article returns to a Scholastic syllogism called baroco to demonstrate the relevance of medieval logic to the history of aesthetics...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 445–452.
Published: 01 December 1946
... in it are considered to “lie out (of the world)” : ealanda maenig ut on garsxcge (Ps.XCVI, 4) an iglond lig8 ut on garsecg (Melra XVI, 12). 1 “Old English Etymologies 11. Garsecg,” in Englische Studien, I1 (1879), 314-15. 2Quotations are from: F. Klaeber, BeoTcdf and the Fight...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (1): 29–31.
Published: 01 March 1955
... on the unfortunate etymological evi- dences of Gustav Becker. . . . Evidently Becker’s important mono- graph was unknown to Professor Linsalata ; it is nowhere mentioned in his paper” (p. 36). That Linsalata could “postulate” his work on Becker’s without knowing it is interesting, but beside the point...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (2): 247–248.
Published: 01 June 1949
... many years. The weightiest essay in the book is an etymological study by Otto Heinertz on the German words Wrrft “warp” and entzuerfen “to throw (oneself) to and fro.” It may very well serve as a model for etymological articles on “Worter und Sachen.” First, the author gives...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (2): 246–247.
Published: 01 June 1949
... many years. The weightiest essay in the book is an etymological study by Otto Heinertz on the German words Wrrft “warp” and entzuerfen “to throw (oneself) to and fro.” It may very well serve as a model for etymological articles on “Worter und Sachen.” First, the author gives...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 96–98.
Published: 01 March 1943
... discusses the nature of language, phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, etymology, and adds a classification of the Indo-European and the Non-Indo-European languages and a history of the study of languages. The student begin- ning the study of linguistics will appreciate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 383–386.
Published: 01 September 2021
... demonstrates from the start his commitment to the finer distinctions of the language employed in theoretical discussions and poetic descriptions of the earth, whether they emerge from etymology, orthography, translation, or other forms of wordplay such as metaphor, pun, or anagram. Language is also the key...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 199–202.
Published: 01 June 1941
...”) by reason of the fact that the river is twofold where the island of Dahlen (Lett. Duoles SaZu)* divides it near the present town of Rips Etymologically, Liv. vans would appear to be closely related to Finn. vuinuntuimi “Tygha latif oZia, bulrush” (a marsh-plant), vainonputki “angelica...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 640–643.
Published: 01 December 1941
... [including Italian dialects 2. “articles on two or more words [Italian or dialectal ; 3. “articles on the etymology of one word even when taken together with other lexicological sections (Vulgar Latin ; dialectology), repre- sent at best an incomplete replica of the references to Italian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (3): 355–356.
Published: 01 September 1945
... irresistible temptation to construct one hy- pothesis upon another, to support folk-lore parallels by means of doubtful etymologies, or to reconstruct an ancient Celtic pantheon from a confusion of learned writings such as the early Irish chronicles and sagas. It is, for example, possible...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 378–379.
Published: 01 September 1950
... is not a case of hypercorrectness (p. 294) if darn goes back to OE dier- nun “hide,” as many etymologists believe. Indeed, the Irish form supports this etymology. The loss of a syllable in England, OE Englaland, is not due to hap- lology (p. 329), as the trisyllabic ME Engeland shows; the first 1...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (3): 353–355.
Published: 01 September 1945
... irresistible temptation to construct one hy- pothesis upon another, to support folk-lore parallels by means of doubtful etymologies, or to reconstruct an ancient Celtic pantheon from a confusion of learned writings such as the early Irish chronicles and sagas. It is, for example, possible...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 591–594.
Published: 01 December 2016
... to apologize for its scholarship, either. At over five hundred pages, it can hardly be called distilled; it is, though, well and thoroughly baked. What will readers find? There are many pages of explanatory paraphrase, liberally studded with quotations, etymologies, and other glosses. If, by some cataclysm...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (4): 371–380.
Published: 01 December 1945
... yre (D: ere). Yre (e er( e?) , is usually interpreted as the “head, butt (of an axe)” ; so Toller, Supplement, s. v., h(e) , Clark- Hall, s. v., Yr, I1 ; the sense is good if the word actually means “head, butt of an axe.” The suggested etymologies hint at an association with, or derivation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 17–20.
Published: 01 March 1956
...Raphael Levy Copyright © 1956 by Duke University Press 1956 THE MEDIEVAL PROVERB NATE QUE NATE By RAPHAELLEVY The etymology of Old French mche, meaning “fesse,” is “natica, which was formed in Vulgar Latin out of Classical Latin natis, just as *avica...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 116–120.
Published: 01 March 1968
... fit. In his discussion of the etymology of the name Guermantes, Graham seems to attach importance to Proust’s correspondence with MartinChauf- fier, expressing regret that the latter’s reply on the subject has never been published @. 245 and n. 2). The fact is, however...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (1): 16–29.
Published: 01 March 1974
... borrowings from Latin or from learned French borrowings from literary Latin. I owe a considerable debt in my work on etymology to Marie Borroff, with whom I worked briefly some time ago. She has recently published an article, “Robert Frost’s New ‘I’es- tament: Language and the Poem” MP, 69...