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diphthong

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
... one) of sound change. This is above all the case when, in the pro- duction of a particular vowel or diphthong, two organs are concerned, and one is active at the front of the mouth while the other is active at the back of it. Concentration results here in the process of fronting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1941) 2 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1941
... Reviews After having disposed of the several forms of assimilation the author passes to an explanation of the Latin initial c, and then, for the phenomenon of diphthongization, he uses the ellipse taken from Jones’s An Outline of English Phonetics. He does not extend his study to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 261–262.
Published: 01 September 1960
...; others could be either Mercian or West Saxon, for example, those in which he suggests that “velar umlaut of a may have occurred” (searo-, ncaro-, bealo-, -ceare, geatu, p. 38). Of this last group, the first three contain analogical breaking diphthongs from the oblique cases and are...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 372–374.
Published: 01 September 1943
... exceedingly cautious). In regard to stressed vowels in Smokies utterance, he points out -(1) tendencies to lengthen or diphthongize many of them, e.g., [I], [el, [c], [ae], [3], [ou], [A]; (2) a wide range of variation in many vowels, as for example, the change of [A] toward [v], [3], or...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 262–264.
Published: 01 September 1960
...-, -ceare, geatu, p. 38). Of this last group, the first three contain analogical breaking diphthongs from the oblique cases and are typical of West Saxon; -ceare shows the West Saxon diph- thongization after initial palatal ; and geatu may be a Mercian form with velar umlaut, a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1943) 4 (4): 413–431.
Published: 01 December 1943
... became *habGmus (>nous avons) . But Schuchardt believed that even in the so-called “regular” phonetic changes, analogy (i.e., mental influence) may be respon- sible: for example, in the development ei > oi we witness a dissimi- lation of the first part of the diphthong e into o in order to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1941) 2 (3): 522–524.
Published: 01 September 1941
..., the Outline presents a number of analyses of specific Romance con- sonantal and vocalic changes, including a relatively extensive dis- cussion of Romance diphthongization. Perhaps the most striking and original evidence in support of the theory is that which demon- strates that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 91–93.
Published: 01 March 1943
... to the task before her and it is unfortunate that no one prevented her from making blunders such as that of speaking of the “Suffix zu” in zuegemessen (p. 33), or of “letters” (pp. 23, 54) when she should have been thinking of sounds, or of the “lengthen- ing of ii to a diphthong” (p. 36...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 98–99.
Published: 01 March 1943
...] as contrasted with Anglo-Saxon bbn [ ba :n] or Dutch been [be :n] .” This is certainly an unusual use of the word “dissimilation,” and, besides, in the German Bein we have no example of diphthongization. The typographical errors noted are : the phonetic transcription of Schwester (p. 52...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1941) 2 (4): 640–643.
Published: 01 December 1941
...; 339-42) that theories of diphthongization are mentioned ; who would ever suspect that the articles of Schuchardt2 and Von Wartburg, listed in the chapter “Classification of the Romance Languages,” contain the most important contributions so far offered to the prob- lem of diphthongization...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
...: diphthongs ai au oi CONSONANTS: bilabial labio-dental dental palato-velar3 velar sonorants nasals n 71 liquid 111 I fricatives voiced w r J (r...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1942) 3 (2): 243–261.
Published: 01 June 1942
... he intends four beats to the line throughout; and the two lines (3, 6) which involve neither final e nor the diphthongs are perfectly regular iambic tetrameter. The following conclusions are then possible. 1. If final e is sounded in lines 2, 8 and 9 they are quite regu- lar. Line 8...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1940) 1 (3): 401–403.
Published: 01 September 1940
...- veranderungen vollziehen, und die geschichtliche Zeit, die durch Vokalveranderungen gekennzeichnet ist.” This statement (p. 97) sounds as though there were no vowel changes in the prehistoric period. 6. In the discussion of the early NHG diphthongization (p. 86) we read : “Diese Diphthongierung...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 96–98.
Published: 01 March 1943
... “dissimilation,” and, besides, in the German Bein we have no example of diphthongization. The typographical errors noted are : the phonetic transcription of Schwester (p. 52) ; substitution (p. 263) ; Paris, 1923 (p. 453) ; and on page 63 there seems to be an omission of a line beginning with the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1963) 24 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1963
... long vowels (by diphthongization) . The reciprocal relationship of Middle English long open and close mid vowels with the short high and mid vowels, respectively, is also demonstrable in examples of lengthening, e.g., OE wicu, zvudu, stelan, stolen. The positing of two ME phonemes, /h...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 458–463.
Published: 01 December 1949
... syllables where they should be counted or to drop them where they should not, failure to elide, wrong syllabication resulting from mispronunciation (such as division of a diphthong or suppression of a separately pronounced vowel), and, less frequently, unusual position of the caesura in a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1947) 8 (2): 257–260.
Published: 01 June 1947
... phonetic spelling, used only for words in which the ordinary spelling system is inadequate, is quite satis- factory. Accent is marked only when it does not fall on ’the first syllable; a period is then placed below the vowel or diphthong of the syllable which is accented. There are only a few...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1950) 11 (2): 131–145.
Published: 01 June 1950
..., 57 (1933), 278. 86 F. brede, “Rezension v. H. Fischers : Zur Geschichte des Mhd AfdA, 16 (1890), 287. Dcrek van AbOk 137 in Stein) or the diphthongization of i, fi, and iu? the well-known Bav. dual ez, enk, enker appears in none of the writings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1956) 17 (4): 310–317.
Published: 01 December 1956
... consonants b, p, f; while the high proportion of diphthongs and unusual consonantal collocations fits the fanciful scene described. In three, the longer vowels and the consonants gr, t, d, underline the dark colors and the heavy flight. Although the poem’s title suggests a “review of birds” (by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1965) 26 (2): 285–301.
Published: 01 June 1965
... done nothing I have done is made up of nothing and the diphthong ae together with the first person...