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decameron

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1982) 43 (4): 404–405.
Published: 01 December 1982
...Stavros Deligiorgis HAMBUECHEN POTTER JOY. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982. x + 230 pp. $20.00. Copyright © 1982 by Duke University Press 1982 REVIEWS Five Frames for the “Decameron”: Communication and Social Systems in the “Cor- nice.” By JOY HAMBUECHENPOTTER. Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1981) 42 (1): 3–20.
Published: 01 March 1981
...Walter R. Davis Copyright © 1981 by Duke University Press 1981 BOCCACCIO’S DECAMERON THE IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY FORM By WALTERR. DAVIS A key to the concerns of the novella-especially the novella as devel- oped by Boccaccio-lies in the etymology...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1944) 5 (4): 487–488.
Published: 01 December 1944
... Decameron stands for a quality of Boccaccio’s art and therefore views the structure of the work as symbolic, a poetic fiction rather than a narrative device. No attempt is made to interpret individual tales figuratively. Professor Boorsch finds in Corneille’s predilection for certain plot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 493–494.
Published: 01 December 1964
... in human life. In his analysis of the Decameron, the author draws on his wide knowledge of Latin, Greek, Provencal, French, English, and German texts to demonstrate the funda- mental unity of European literature. By showing how literature and philosophy affect each other in the quest...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1940) 1 (4): 573–575.
Published: 01 December 1940
... his phraseology seems to have increased progressively from the period of 1336-1339 at least to the period of the ballate of the Decameron . . .” (page 143). However, in the case of Petrarch, the data prove, Mr. Silber concluded, that the influence of Petrarch on the lyrics of Boccaccio...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1982) 43 (4): 405–407.
Published: 01 December 1982
... will do. As homely as it sounds, a “learning experience” clearly provides a better starting point for the identification of the analytical domains where the individual and the col- lective cross in the Decameron, and a better gauge for the rate at which one idea (say, God-in-the-world) recedes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 365–370.
Published: 01 December 1960
... casibus virorum illustrium (in 1400 and again in 1409), the Decameron (between 1411 and 1414), and possi- bly also the Italian master’s De claris mulieribus (1416 He is credited with a translation of Aristotle’s Economics from a Latin version in 1418 and, at about the same time, a rendition of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1950) 11 (1): 105–106.
Published: 01 March 1950
... the title of the ballade might make us suspicious of the truth of this conclusion. On page 283, Miss Bowden on the basis of a very dubious parallel suggests that Chaucer may possibly have bor- rowed his picture of the Pardoner from Boccaccio’s Decameron. After some contemporary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1962) 23 (3): 225–228.
Published: 01 September 1962
... Nouvelles (Bwcaccio’s Decameron) The fragment of forty-four folios extant at Limoges is not No. 4 as previously listed, but rather Fonds Bosvieux (5F) Q 7. It shows letters and flourishes in the Limousin style of the fifteenth century. De la vraye amitik (Cicero’s De amicitia) *(1) MS 128...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1958) 19 (3): 262–270.
Published: 01 September 1958
... of Bureau de Dampmartin, a rich bourgeois of Paris. The manuscripts, like those of Des cas, are from 300 to 400 folios in length, often adorned with ornate letters and numerous miniatures to illustrate the text. The number of extant manuscripts of the Decameron remains com- paratively...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1983) 44 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1983
... characters in the Decameron, often simple in themselves, are agents or objects of perspective, interesting not as individual portraits but because of the way other characters, including the audience, respond to them. In the final chapter of this book, Chaucer is implicitly given top honors as the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1950) 11 (1): 106–108.
Published: 01 March 1950
... this conclusion. On page 283, Miss Bowden on the basis of a very dubious parallel suggests that Chaucer may possibly have bor- rowed his picture of the Pardoner from Boccaccio’s Decameron. After some contemporary quotations about dishonest reeves, we are told on pages 251 -52 that in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1963) 24 (4): 419–422.
Published: 01 December 1963
... English Translation ( 1543-1657). Durham : Duke Uni- versity Press, 1963. Pp. viii + 262. $8.75. Scagiione, Aldo D. Nature and Love in the Late Middle Ages: An Essay on the Cultural Context of the Decameron. Berkeley : University of California Press, 1963. Pp. x + 250. $6.00. Spitzer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 494–496.
Published: 01 December 1964
..., and this I consider arbitrary. He could have done more with the intrinsic values of style and structure in so rich a book as the Decameron. I take issue with one aspect of his terminology: I do not see why he makes “naturalism” a perennial category and “romanticism” a historically condi...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 494–496.
Published: 01 December 1964
... identifies “impressionistic” methods with Croceanism and New Criticism, and this I consider arbitrary. He could have done more with the intrinsic values of style and structure in so rich a book as the Decameron. I take issue with one aspect of his terminology: I do not see why he makes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1998) 59 (2): 273–275.
Published: 01 June 1998
... its originality and power. The following five chapters pursue the afterlives of typology and hagiography in Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Vasari’s Lives of the Artists, and Shakespeare’s Measurefor Measure and Winter’s Tale. A recurrent theme is the generic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 436–441.
Published: 01 December 1986
..., ostensibly celebrated in the Decameron, is subjected to a fierce critique. . . . (p. 192; see also pp. 7-8, 50, 76-77, 116, 122-23, 131, 136, 158, 187, 211, 213, 242) Mazzotta has far too keen and subtle a sense of the irony of his text not to be aware that he too is a critic and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 387–392.
Published: 01 December 1960
... Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 Oscar Budel 387 Decameron manuscripts. The Parisian Decameron Bibl. Nat. Ital. 63, for ex- ample, which has illustrations in pen and ink with wash color and also bears a coat of arms, is dated by its scribe as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1974) 35 (3): 219–230.
Published: 01 September 1974
... and other early fourteenth-century trouvtres did pre- cisely this,18 and of course in the Decameron Boccaccio puts certain tales in the fabliau tradition into the mouths not of churls but of re- fined young ladies. It seems likely that Chaucer’s literary problem was not how to introduce...