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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1951) 12 (3): 286–291.
Published: 01 September 1951
...Edward D. Seeber Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 OROONOKO AND CRUSOE’S MAN FRIDAY By EDWARDD. SEEBER Some years ago, Professor Arthur W. Secord published a method- ical investigation of the sources of Robinson Crusoe,l with abundant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1966) 27 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 June 1966
... University Press, 1965. xiii + 203 pp. $6.50. G. A. Starr seeks to show Defoe’s debt, in Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, to the tradition of spiritual autobiography in the seventeenth century. In reviewing the tradition, he concentrates on Presbyterian and Anglican sources rather than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 199–202.
Published: 01 June 1984
... reassessment of Defoe, and particularly of his greatest work, Robinson Crusoe. Sill comes to Defoe as a Marxist-or, to be more precise, as a follower of Raymond Williams and of Antonio Gramsci- which gives him two advantages. First, since he believes Defoe’s work, both fictional and nonfictional...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1986) 47 (3): 321–324.
Published: 01 September 1986
...., pursues these tensions through a series of perceptive analyses of widely diverse fictional works, including Paradise Lost, The Pilgrim’s Procgress,Robinson Crusoe, Clarissa, and TomJones, as well as through various autobiographical ones, including Augustine’s Co?fessionS, Bunyan’s Grace...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1972) 33 (4): 449–453.
Published: 01 December 1972
..., in his theoretical discussions, a sense of knowing what is central in pastoral and what is peripheral, but his catego- ries and definitions are broad enough to allow lucid comments on such bor- derline works as Robinson Crusoe: [Crusoe’s] basic impulses are closer to georgic than to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2008) 69 (4): 533–556.
Published: 01 December 2008
....24 Novel’s Foe Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe traces, through the misadventures of its hero, the progress of a civilization Christian, European, and bourgeois. In a lecture on Defoe to an Italian audience, James Joyce described Crusoe as “an architect, a carpenter, a knife grinder, an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1943) 4 (4): 512–513.
Published: 01 December 1943
... probably germinated from a newspaper item of 1705, that this was expanded through extensive use of Robert Knox’s Ceylon (already known to us as a source of Robinson Crusoe), and that Defoe drew in various ways upon his own first-hand knowledge of Madagascar, some of which he had utilized before...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1978) 39 (1): 76–77.
Published: 01 March 1978
... lives, real or self-inflicted” (p. 27) of Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver, and Uncle Toby. Though the discussion includes an interesting analysis of Gulliver’s move- ment from “fluency to blockage, from speech to speechlessness” (p. 45), Car- nochan’s thematic concern does not appreciably extend...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 200–203.
Published: 01 June 1977
... 20 1 fictional, that explore a common theme: the role of the imagination in Cow- per’s Memoir and Robinson Crusoe and, in a later chapter, in Boswell’s London Journal and Tom Jones; ambivalence toward power in autobiogra- phies, letters, and novels by Laetitia Pilkington, Lady Mary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 194–196.
Published: 01 June 1977
..., there is nothing obscure about this reading. Without any direct state- ment of psychological method, it is eclectically Freudian, but as Zimmerman rightly notes on one occasion, Defbe’s own “Freudianism” can be “almost orthodox” (p. 82). Zimmerman starts out by seeing Crusoe as a near projec...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1995) 56 (1): 102–105.
Published: 01 March 1995
... benefit of the court” (231) . His concern to find that later heroes are generative fathers leads to dubious claims about The Way Ofthe World and Robinson Crusoe. He is driven to insist that of all the male characters in The Way, only Mirabell is “capable of fathering” and that Sir Willful is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1995) 56 (1): 99–102.
Published: 01 March 1995
... of the court” (231) . His concern to find that later heroes are generative fathers leads to dubious claims about The Way Ofthe World and Robinson Crusoe. He is driven to insist that of all the male characters in The Way, only Mirabell is “capable of fathering” and that Sir Willful is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2016) 77 (4): 595–597.
Published: 01 December 2016
... legitimate aesthetic aim. When Defoe titled his first novel The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe , for example, he employed an older sense of the word, physical in nature, and therefore largely lost to us today: “Surprise was conceived of as a fully corporeal emotion: a sudden...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 196–199.
Published: 01 June 1984
... to the modern scholarly reassessment of Defoe, and particularly of his greatest work, Robinson Crusoe. Sill comes to Defoe as a Marxist-or, to be more precise, as a follower of Raymond Williams and of Antonio Gramsci- which gives him two advantages. First, since he believes Defoe’s work...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1980) 41 (3): 287–291.
Published: 01 September 1980
...). Thus Roxana, Singleton, Moll, and Crusoe exist both in his readers’ time, “the flow of historical time,” and “outside their own periods . . . in that timeless realm of the imagination where they may easily be regarded as one of us” (p. 41). Yet when Alkon shows the coupling of chronologies in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 202–204.
Published: 01 June 1984
...Robert W. Uphaus Everett Zimmerman. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1983. 183 pp. $19.50. Copyright © 1984 by Duke University Press 1984 202 REVIEWS type of self-control that Crusoe appears to admire. Certainly the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1994) 55 (3): 334–336.
Published: 01 September 1994
... mideighteenthcentury georgic, Defoe’s Serious RejZec- tions of Robinson Crusoe, and essays by two authors a century apart, Shaftesbury and Coleridge. As readings, these chapters deserve attention from anyone interested in the texts they address. As literary history, they allow a modular, rather than a textual...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1941) 2 (4): 662–664.
Published: 01 December 1941
... More; and, though it became in the eighteenth century almost a special kind of fiction, it was never closely restricted either as to content or form, culminating, as it did, in such ill-sorted masterpieces as Robinson Crusoe, GuZZi- ver‘s Travels, and Candide. Mr. Gove’s valuable...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1943) 4 (4): 513–514.
Published: 01 December 1943
...” is but another Robinson Crusoe experience, another exhibition of Defoe’s ability to visualize, to present a-dramatic scene, and withal to adhere to and maintain an extraordinary sense of fact. With this study, Professor Moore adds to the already thick sheaf of painstakingly exhumed fact that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1993) 54 (3): 393–404.
Published: 01 September 1993
... Robinson Crusoe and Bou- vard et Picuchet and Orlando and One Hundred Years of Solitude, and most any other example one could name. Above all the novel’s totemic model, Don Quixote, demonstrates a fierce resistance to genre. Reiss takes the Quixote as definitively premodern. He regards Cervantes...