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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1959) 20 (3): 233–242.
Published: 01 September 1959
...S. L. Goldberg © 1959 University of Washington 1959 FOLLY INTO CRIME THE CATASTROPHE OF VOLPONE By S. L. GOLDBERG The catastrophe that befalls the protagonists of VoZpone has worried critics as it evidently worried Jonson himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2007) 68 (1): 87–110.
Published: 01 March 2007
... French Fiction (2006) and coeditor of a special issue of Yale French Studies , “Crime Fictions” (2005). Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Street Names and Private-Public Violence in Modern French Crime Fiction Andrea Goulet dgar Allan Poe’s inaugural detective story “The Murders in the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1992) 53 (4): 483–486.
Published: 01 December 1992
... timely reminder that, without such scholarship, the study of nineteenth-century fiction is impoverished. DAVIDPARKER Dickens House Museum and Library Crimes of Writing:Problas in the Containment of Z%$waentation.By SUMSTEWART...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1996) 57 (2): 141–150.
Published: 01 June 1996
...Josefina Ludmer © 1996 University of Washington 1996 The Corpus Delicti Josefina Ludmer would like to use the juridical notion of the corpus delicti, the “body I of the crime,” in its literal sense of evidence, proof of the truth, and at the same time the literary notion of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1996) 57 (2): 269–278.
Published: 01 June 1996
..., crime, and perversion to confront pas- sions and the complexity of social life. Josefina Ludmer has observed, with respect to gauchesca literature, that the delinquent serves to organize the state from beyond.1 From a 1 Ludmer, El gkogauchesco: Un trutado sobre la patria (Buenos Aires...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 434–450.
Published: 01 December 1964
... 435 his last major work, La Chute, the trial is internalized, producing an ambiguous form of selfcondemnation and self-defense, which is closer in feeling to the dizzying enigmas of the Kafkaesque experience. L’Etrunger2 follows the conventional chronological sequence of crime and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1998) 59 (1): 129–131.
Published: 01 March 1998
... independence.’ Verges asserted that Barbie’s crimes were not a unique monument of evil and did not fall into the cate- gory defined by the Nuremberg trials as crimes against humanity; instead they were assimilable into the diffuse and circumstantial domain of war crimes. In the French nouueau roman and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1952) 13 (1): 56–60.
Published: 01 March 1952
... is the story of Milton Northwick, the treasurer of the Ponkwasset Mills, who embezzles a large sum of money from his firm and escapes to Canada. The novel appeared at a time when such cases were being reported in the news- papers frequently, and in view of the great public interest in crimes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1947) 8 (4): 496–498.
Published: 01 December 1947
..., but that he was guilty of the crimes charged against him by powerful foes, or that those crimes were the real reason for his long imprisonment, is still open to question. In another 498 Reviews connection Chambers remarks : “supposition is not evidence.” But an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1969) 30 (3): 460–462.
Published: 01 September 1969
... symbolic relation to refracted light indicates his guilt.. . then his symbolic relation to un- obstructed light in these final lines may suggest an expiation of his crime . . .” (p. 24; my italics). There is a later reference to “the dream-reality theme” (p. 25), and a number of lines using...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1945) 6 (3): 271–284.
Published: 01 September 1945
... lust. I1 There is a new narrative pattern or plot in The Testament of Cres- seid which makes the poem an independent dramatic whole. This plot may be arbitrarily described by the three-fold sequence of contract, crime, and punishment. The contract consists of an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1960) 21 (1): 88–89.
Published: 01 March 1960
... of the Folkungs early in 1899, interrupting himself only to write Crimes and Crimes, and then resumed with Gustaz! Kasa and Erik XIV which he finished by the end of July. Two years and nine plays later Strindberg wrote Engel- brekt. In short, tracing the canon in this fashion, one is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1968) 29 (4): 385–394.
Published: 01 December 1968
... the poem as “wanton” and “Ungentle.” Further, the whole first stanza concerns itself with the troopers and the impossibility of their crime being expiated, and the next stanza begins with the words “Unconstant Sylvio,” which would indicate that Marvel1 in- tended a parallel to be...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2012) 73 (3): 351–372.
Published: 01 September 2012
...- doxy, which promises consumer plenitude and individual freedom, and the state’s complicity in subjecting its citizens to abject destitution pro- duces doubled consciousness and “occult economies,” in which “the spectacular rise . . . of organized crime...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1974) 35 (3): 302–316.
Published: 01 September 1974
... townspeople to condemn Claire in collusion with I11 now causes them to execute him unjustly in collusion with Claire. The outlawing of cap- ital punishment (p. 275) adds to the measure of the crime against Ill: he is condemned to death for perjury, traditionally a noncapital offense, in a nation that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 347–365.
Published: 01 December 1986
... causes of panic and prosecu- tion were specific to particular locales, the definitive act of witch- craft slowly shifted from maleficium (doing harm to other people) to making compacts with Satan. In England, the 1604 statute that made witchcraft a capital crime was a kind of compromise...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1945) 6 (1): 93–98.
Published: 01 March 1945
... potential consequences of the social misunderstanding and misapplication of Darwin’s theory. Curiously enough the alleged menace of Darwinism to social ethics was impressed upon both Daudet and Bourget by a crime ckZt3bre committed in Paris, April 6, 1878-the Affaire Lebie~-BarrC.~ Lebiez...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1998) 59 (1): 124–129.
Published: 01 March 1998
... for independence.’ Verges asserted that Barbie’s crimes were not a unique monument of evil and did not fall into the cate- gory defined by the Nuremberg trials as crimes against humanity; instead they were assimilable into the diffuse and circumstantial domain of war crimes. In the French...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 194–196.
Published: 01 June 1977
... Defoe’s characters, only William Walters, the renegade Quaker, has such a secure identity that his crimes may be brushed aside after a little repentance. Zimmerman starts out by taking Defoe seriously as a thinker and writer. At one point, he remarks acutely that although Defoe can reveal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1947) 8 (4): 498–499.
Published: 01 December 1947
... English scholarship to thne discrediting of a man who suffered twenty years of imprison- ment for crimes of which he was never proved guilty by trial. Why not give to a valiant soldier and a noble writer the benefit of a doubt ? LAURAHIBBARD LOOMIS New...