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crashaw

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1970) 31 (3): 380–381.
Published: 01 September 1970
... REVIEWS The Wit of Love: Donne, Carew, Crashaw, Marvell. By LDUIS LA. MARTZ. London and Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, Ward-Phillips Lectures in English Language and Literature, Volume 3, 1969. 216 pp. $10.00. The 1Vit of Love is a slim, richly illustrated, and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2019) 80 (3): 233–259.
Published: 01 September 2019
... copia during the sixteenth century that led to similarly far-fetched poetic practices during the seventeenth century. John Stockwood’s Progymnasma scholasticum (1597) is read alongside Richard Crashaw’s Epigrammatum sacrorum liber (1634) and Steps to the Temple (1646) to reveal the effects of Erasmian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1979) 40 (2): 198–200.
Published: 01 June 1979
..., liturgical hymns, and literary conventions derived from these), Low offers a chapter each on Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, Her- rick, Marvell, and Traherne; a brief conclusion restates the compromises that each poet makes, and claims again that recognition of the four basic modes and their...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 500–501.
Published: 01 December 1950
... knew his craft. Like Ben Jonson, Crashaw, Bishop King, and Marvel1 he knew how to weight the tetrameter line to a stately march whereas with the nineteenth-century poets it minces. And despite Dryden’s neglect, he wrote pentameter couplets with a poised and aphoristic balance which might...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 75–77.
Published: 01 March 1972
... solved; the clarities of Jonson, Herrick, Herbert, and Carew elude explana- tion and make mock of classifications. Crashaw remains an exotic in most readings, including Summers’s; Vaughan antl Traherne are remarkably open; Suckling’s life and death seem to belie his verse; Lovelace manages an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1979) 40 (2): 196–198.
Published: 01 June 1979
..., Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, Her- rick, Marvell, and Traherne; a brief conclusion restates the compromises that each poet makes, and claims again that recognition of the four basic modes and their interrelationships can expand our sense of the achievement of seven- teen th-cen tury devotional verse...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 501–502.
Published: 01 December 1950
... own Cathol- icism was consistent and well-known. Yet his poetry, unlike that of his con- temporary, Crashaw, was scarcely touched by his faith. This argues neither insincerity nor weakness on Habington’s part. It merely testifies to the com- pleteness with which Catholicism as a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1986) 47 (3): 316–318.
Published: 01 September 1986
... point to point when one might prefer him to explain himself. For instance, I am not sure that we “see the overall design of Herbert’s volume as a temple” at all clearly, or that Crashaw’s St. Teresa is seen “more vividly” than in her pictorial or plastic representations (p. 23). Some further...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1973) 34 (4): 464–467.
Published: 01 December 1973
..., “Appearance and Reality,” some acute remarks on the differences between Donne and Crashaw lead to the conclusion that Donne chooses the Mannerist option, Crashaw the High Baroque “within the Baroque” (p. 32). The second essay on “The Experience 4 66...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1954) 15 (1): 76–77.
Published: 01 March 1954
... figure was adapted, in a lighter vein, to love poetry, by Herrick, Lord Herbert, Waller, and others, and satirized by Cleveland as “Love a la Euclid.” Tears-Crashaw’s “portable and com- pendious oceans”-were a persistent minor circle-figure of the century. Pro- fessor Nicolson...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 526–527.
Published: 01 December 1949
... “spiritual poetry” of Shelley and Keats, the religion of the arts of Walter Pater were a surer path to true religion than the sermons of Lancelot Andrewes, the holy sonnets of Donne, or even George Herbert’s and Richard Crashaw’s occa- sionally touching but more often disappointing poetry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 542–544.
Published: 01 December 1949
... Effect of Stoicism upon His Tragedies. New York: King's Crown Press, Columbia University, 1949. Pp. x 4- 218. $2.75. Willey, Basil. Richard Crashaw (1612/13-1649). A Memorial Lecture Deliv- ered at Peterhouse, Cambridge on 11 July 1949. Cambridge: At the Univer- sity Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 499–500.
Published: 01 December 1950
...-century poet, no matter how flat, was never incompetent. His poetry, as Mr. Allott declares in his admirable introduc- tion, was too often a “poetry of statement,” but technically he knew his craft. Like Ben Jonson, Crashaw, Bishop King, and Marvel1 he knew how to weight the tetrameter line to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 504–505.
Published: 01 December 1950
.... Bennett has produced three brief studies in which quotations rather monotonously interrupt the flow of sensitive comment. Her range is impressive. Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, and Crashaw (Four Mete physical Poets, 1934), those imprisoners of the abstract in the concrete, gave way to a novelist...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 505–506.
Published: 01 December 1950
... engagingly modest critic, Mrs. Bennett has produced three brief studies in which quotations rather monotonously interrupt the flow of sensitive comment. Her range is impressive. Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, and Crashaw (Four Mete physical Poets, 1934), those imprisoners of the abstract in the concrete...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1982) 43 (3): 310–312.
Published: 01 September 1982
... Satire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982. xx + 388 pp. $35.00. Weiss, Wolfgang (editor). Die englische Satire. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Wege der Forschung, 562, 1982. x + 435 pp. DM 65.00. Young, R. V. Richard Crashaw and the Spanish Golden Age. New Haven and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 375–376.
Published: 01 December 1960
... predecessors and contemporaries such as Crashaw, Shelley, and Patmore. This study may raise the standing of a poet who is too often classed with wispy beings like Dowson. Danchin asserts that Thompson belongs rather with Hopkins and can even be regarded as a precursor of Eliot. But he tries to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 376–377.
Published: 01 December 1960
... experiments, besides indicating his in- debtedness to predecessors and contemporaries such as Crashaw, Shelley, and Patmore. This study may raise the standing of a poet who is too often classed with wispy beings like Dowson. Danchin asserts that Thompson belongs rather with Hopkins and can...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 89–90.
Published: 01 March 1961
... Sootherne (or Southern) introduced the ode into England in 1584 with his clumsy pilferings from Ronsard. Southern was fol- lowed more successfully by Barnes, Campion, and Drayton, “the first proper ode writer in English.” Jonson, Herrick, Milton, and Crashaw (the only other poets Carol...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 90–91.
Published: 01 March 1961
... in 1584 with his clumsy pilferings from Ronsard. Southern was fol- lowed more successfully by Barnes, Campion, and Drayton, “the first proper ode writer in English.” Jonson, Herrick, Milton, and Crashaw (the only other poets Carol Maddison mentions, though some-Davenant, for example...