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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1977) 38 (3): 276–291.
Published: 01 September 1977
...Nina Auerbach Copyright © 1977 by Duke University Press 1977 “But, to be sure, what a town Cranford is for ELIZABETH GASKELL’S “SLY JAVELINS” GOVERNING WOMEN IN CRANFORD AND HAWORTH By NINAAUERBACH Genial and humorous...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1967) 28 (2): 240–247.
Published: 01 June 1967
... canon or a newly meaningful approach to some portion of it. Each deplores the fact- as must anyone familiar with North and South and The Life of Char- lotte Bronte-that to the common reader Mrs. Gaskell is chiefly known (when she is known at all) as the author of Cranford, a pleasant but in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1978) 39 (3): 312–314.
Published: 01 September 1978
... about. He begins by saying that women exemplify the process of separation and es- trangement he is dealing with, because both traditional marriage and their position as oddities in a male-defined world force them into paradigmatic isolation. But he goes on to dismiss Gaskell’s Cranford and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 2011
... almost integral to such late-­century novels as The Sacred Fount. Partly because Puckett freights his book with such large claims about narrative, his sentences sometimes verge on the hyperbolic. Concerning a character in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 110–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
... sometimes verge on the hyperbolic. Concerning a character in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s] gesture’s exceptional status is preserved in such a way as both to foreground narration’s own exceptional resistance to history’s pull in Cran- 116...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 114–116.
Published: 01 March 2011
... sometimes verge on the hyperbolic. Concerning a character in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s] gesture’s exceptional status is preserved in such a way as both to foreground narration’s own exceptional resistance to history’s pull in Cran- 116...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 116–120.
Published: 01 March 2011
... almost integral to such late-­century novels as The Sacred Fount. Partly because Puckett freights his book with such large claims about narrative, his sentences sometimes verge on the hyperbolic. Concerning a character in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 120–124.
Published: 01 March 2011
... Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s] gesture’s exceptional status is preserved in such a way as both to foreground narration’s own exceptional resistance to history’s pull in Cran- 116 MLQ March 2011 ford  and to disclose this...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2011) 72 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 March 2011
... sometimes verge on the hyperbolic. Concerning a character in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, for instance, Puckett writes: “Her [Mary’s] gesture’s exceptional status is preserved in such a way as both to foreground narration’s own exceptional resistance to history’s pull in Cran- 116...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2005) 66 (4): 443–476.
Published: 01 December 2005
...). In such nostalgic evocations of a “quaint” past, Hubback’s novel reads more like midcentury domestic novels such as Gaskell’s Cranford (1851–53) and Wives and Daughters, with their fond delineation of pre- industrial rural society, than like either Austen or silver-fork fiction. Set in the...