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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 447–471.
Published: 01 September 2016
... necessity that this attitude expresses, although that is indisputable, but the way it conceives of the future as always already happening now . In this cosmically expanded present, real time and long term are not at odds but are two intertwined dimensions of the will to corporate immortality. On a 2015...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 367–389.
Published: 01 September 2008
... that despite seemingly divergent styles, they share major formal and thematic characteristics. Responding in tandem to the metaphysical crisis of modernity, both aim systematically to replace metaphysical purpose and sublime religious experience with physical sensation and secular ecstasy, to corporealize...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (3): 311–334.
Published: 01 September 2019
... at the turn of the century and that has proved crucial to the survival of these institutions. References Alworth David J. 2015 . Site Reading: Fiction, Art, Social Form . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . Brickey Kathleen F. 1982 . “ Corporate Criminal Accountability...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (4): 500–502.
Published: 01 December 1945
... and then to the librarian for “another thousand dol- lars” for books, but received no answer. He wrote to the corporation “respectfully requesting” the purchase, for the college library, of a book by Turner on Ancient British Poetry, for sale at Little’s for $3.12. Professor Johnson notes, without comment...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (3): 341–362.
Published: 01 September 2009
... — that is, they cannot attest that they think what they say.2 Speech informed by thought distinguishes even the least intelligent human beings from animals whose anatomy permits them to produce words but not thought. By focusing on talking birds, Descartes sepa- rates the corporeality of language...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 181–183.
Published: 01 June 1972
... and resuscitation of lovers was, for Renaissance Neoplatonism, Nlarsilio Ficino’s Commentary on Pla to’s Sym- posium, the passage does not refer to kisses. Perella doubtlessly correctly iden- tifies the source of “amator animus est proprio in corpore mortuus, in alieno corpore vivens” as Plato’s epigram...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 253–255.
Published: 01 June 1943
...- temporary Hell and Purgatory. Sholokhov’s novels become represen- tations of the corporate Russian state. Mann’s voluminous fictions become statements of individual Protestantism against mass creeds and traditions. Aldous Huxley becomes a “thinker and observer first,” his fiction a means...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 March 2012
... from the family- run ven- tures of nineteenth- century capitalism to the multitiered, professionally managed corporations that characterized German and American pro- duction, the Irish government found it necessary to close off networks...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (3): 380–383.
Published: 01 September 2003
... This evocation of a human, corporeal musicality is the heart of Hol- singer’s argument and forms the basis of his readings of medieval literary texts. The second major purpose of his book, then, is to offer an analysis of canonical medieval literature as fundamentally concerned with musicality— but not just...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (1): 59–83.
Published: 01 March 1999
... earlier in the sequence. But the poetic portrayal is again interrupted, by passages that introduce not only the legal discourse of congressional testimony (“Mr. Griswold: ‘A corporation is a body without a soul but also the popu- lar discourse of news accounts and gangster films: Mr...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 183–186.
Published: 01 June 1972
... of lovers was, for Renaissance Neoplatonism, Nlarsilio Ficino’s Commentary on Pla to’s Sym- posium, the passage does not refer to kisses. Perella doubtlessly correctly iden- tifies the source of “amator animus est proprio in corpore mortuus, in alieno corpore vivens” as Plato’s epigram as re...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (2): 119–127.
Published: 01 June 2014
... , no. 3 : 3 – 20 . Donohue Frank . 2008 . The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities . New York : Fordham University Press . Elfenbein Andrew . 2010 . Romanticism and the Rise of English . Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press . Graff...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (2): 239–259.
Published: 01 June 2023
... in the literary world until Sandra Dijkstra, her agent, “discovered” her. Lavish advance praise and rave reviews propelled the novel to nine months on the New York Times bestseller list; sparked a bidding war for paperback rights among corporate publishers whose offers started at $100,000 and peaked at $1.2...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (4): 321–335.
Published: 01 December 1960
... in aeream qualitatem, ut jam possint ab igne pati. . Ficino maintained that, since the external form reflects the inner 5 Migne, Patrologia Graeca, CXXII (Paris, 1864), cols. 838-39, 871 (Chap. 23 : “Quomodo daemones percutiantur, deque daemoniaci a solido corpore differ- entia...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 513–534.
Published: 01 December 1990
... only dwelling lies “in the middle” (p. 227) of the borough, like the House of the Town Council in Vondervotteimittiss. Occupying this lone cottage is the sole citizen of Onevote, Mr. Corporate. Seemingly only one in number, he is yet, as his name indicates, as many as the Town Council...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (1): 42–57.
Published: 01 March 1971
... enjoys his own eloquence in complaining about it (p. 203). It is the same with the bend sinister, accidentally in- corporated into the Shandy arms on the family carriage: he would rather grumble at it than have it repainted (p. 314). Since mental and verbal constructs are his reality, he has...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (1): 20–38.
Published: 01 March 1951
... said, for example, that “the higher the mind is elevated to the contemplation of spiritual things, the farther it withdraws from the corporeal ones” ; the statement was a commonplace of Christian and Neo-Platonic traditions. The tendency in the later Renaissance, on the contrary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (2): 207–238.
Published: 01 June 2023
..., queer uptake illuminates the fundamental corporeality of character as an aesthetic form as well as how character-details yearn for (re)circulation. Queer uptake relies on the agency of character-details to twist against character types. This agency is key to contemporary queer writers who aim...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 243–253.
Published: 01 September 1962
..., and as a result his principal contribution is that of demonstrating the thematic unity of the Fragment, “the basic formula of Swift’s interwebbed design” : “enthusiasm is not spiritual but corporeal behavior-animal instinct, and the baseness of the flesh, on the one hand; enthusiasm, and pride...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (3): 373–393.
Published: 01 September 2017
... do not simply “lik[en] spiritual to corporal forms” ( PL , 5.573) or “compare / Small things with greatest” ( PR , 4.563–64). 3 They neither presume transcendence based in universal physiology nor adhere strictly to cultural scripts that cordon off the seventeenth century. Rather, they animate...