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consonant

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 5–8.
Published: 01 March 1942
... may be present or want- ing in a weak syllable; hence, the liquids and nasals of weak syl- lables may be consonantal or sonantal. Thus, [n] is a consonant in the strong syllable man; it is likewise a consonant in the weak syllable of woman, but a sonant in the weak syllable of beuten...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
... and archaic Latin cii becoming 6: in Classical Latin). The Oxford Dictionary says that a diphthong is a “ Union of two vowels pronounced in one syllable ; the combination of a sonantal with a consonantal vowel.” Only the latter part of this definition is correct; two vowels cannot enter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
.... It occurs medi- ally, finally, and initially before voiceless consonants, and is derived from : (1) MHG g (c, k when final in Standard MHG) in final or pre- consonantal position : sagd “says”, d5:g “day”, we:g “way”, etc. (2) MHG g before e when the latter disappears in KG...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
... a a: diphthongs ai au oi CONSONANTS: bilabial labio-dental dental palato-velar3 velar sonorants nasals n 71 liquid 111 I fricatives voiced w r J (r...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 21–33.
Published: 01 March 1946
.... The Defeat of Don Roderick (George Moir, Edinburgh Review, [January, 18241 ) re- peats the same vowel sound uy at the end of every line; since he carefully refrained from putting any consonant or vowel after this sound, we do not know whether he intended it as consonantal rime or assonance...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (3): 372–374.
Published: 01 September 1943
.... The results are presented in four chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. The Vowel Sounds of Stressed Syllables. 3. The Vowel Sounds of Unstressed and Partially Stressed Syllables. 4. The Consonants. Mr. Hall is careful not to present his findings as a complete and exhaustive record, yet it is difficult...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 310–317.
Published: 01 December 1956
..., p, f; while the high proportion of diphthongs and unusual consonantal collocations fits the fanciful scene described. In three, the longer vowels and the consonants gr, t, d, underline the dark colors and the heavy flight. Although the poem’s title suggests a “review of birds...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (4): 409–424.
Published: 01 December 1971
...- cially heavy in this sequence, so that we are sometimes reminded of Hopkins, or of Anglo-Saxon verse, both of which apparently were im- portant stylistic influences on Roethke. Besides alliteration (and in- ternal consonance), we find a conscious, controlled use of assonance and internal rhyme...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 342–361.
Published: 01 December 1988
... and again in discussions of the poem, because the final impression it creates is one of consonance and harmony. But the special harmo- nies of Four Quartets depend on the poem’s own special kind of dissonance-a dissonance that provides the formal vehicle for the major subject of the poem...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 342–361.
Published: 01 December 1988
... and again in discussions of the poem, because the final impression it creates is one of consonance and harmony. But the special harmo- nies of Four Quartets depend on the poem’s own special kind of dissonance-a dissonance that provides the formal vehicle for the major subject of the poem...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (4): 419–443.
Published: 01 December 1998
.... Bal’mont thinks that his Poe-like stanza form, with its dramatic, multiple rhyming consonants, best captures the fiery spirit of crackling flame embodied in the Georgian language, landscape, and people; in Rustaveli; and in his Panther Skin.5 Bal’montian virtuosic translation is thus meant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 113–114.
Published: 01 March 1943
... the sounding of final -e before a vowel-beginning word, or, vice versa, the silenc- ing of the -e before a consonant. These exceptions have been care- fully set forth in the systematically arranged “Demonstration” which constitutes the major part of this book, and are restricted to modern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 266–267.
Published: 01 June 1940
... consonant affect the quantity of the preceding sounds ? The Method: By means of an electro-acoustic system the experimenters made graphic records of 151 pronunciations by 21 different speakers of eight dissyllabic nonsense words having a single intervocalic consonant. Since...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 219–227.
Published: 01 June 1944
... normal phonological evolution into O.F. entir. C.L. words which were accented on the antepenult and which had an occlusive consonant followed by r at the beginning of the last syllable regu- larly shifted the accent to the penult in V.L.l : C.L. integrum > V.L. entkgru > O.F. entir through...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (1): 81–104.
Published: 01 March 2016
..., too, if spirit / art is allowed as a consonant rhyme. Monique Morgan ( 2009 : 151) also notes the sonnet structure apparent in this passage and catalogs several of its rhyme-like sound effects in her argument about lyric and narrative. Matthew Reynolds ( 2001 : 119–21) points to other moments...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 401–407.
Published: 01 December 1947
... assonance in the strict sense (rhyme of the stressed vowel, the consonants being different) ; or the consonants before the stressed vowel may be the same, or those after, or both. This is altogether too undulating and diverse for my taste, and sacrifices the definiteness and clarity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 199–202.
Published: 01 June 1941
..., to that by which they knew the Western Dvina (ORuss. Dvina). The Northern Dvina, too, is a twofold stream, for it is formed by the confluence of the Sukliona 6 In Baltic Fennic initial consonant-groups are in general represented by the second consonant only; thus Finn. tukki: Icel. stokkr...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 1959
... in those grotesquely long sentences which, in England, are not infrequently called “Professorendeutsch.” Moreover, in comparison with Italian, for example, German has for Southern ears an overpowering richness of consonants. Antoine Rivarol refers to German as “trop rich et trop dur...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 472–475.
Published: 01 September 1942
... is the conclusion, recently reaffirmed by Pro- fessor Lewis (op. cit., I, 3-s), that the name originated as a de- scriptive, complimentary epithet. The purpose of Dr. N. M. Caffee’s article is “to call attention to certain variations in the pronunciation of a [consonant] sound which are possibly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 257–260.
Published: 01 June 1947
... forms as nulznze [ na”ma] and suhe [ z.”a] (in opposition to the present indicative forms ich nehme [ ix nema] and ich sehe [ ix 2531 ) . In § 13, the table of consonants, [ts] is listed, but not [pf]. The same procedure is followed in $ 17, the German spelling table. Either...