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clough

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 226–227.
Published: 01 June 1964
.... This is a testi- mony to the nobility of her character. PAULLF. BAUM University of North Carolina The Poetry of Clough: An Essay in Revaluation. By WALTERE. HOUGH- TON. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1963. Pp. xii + 236. $5.00...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 208–222.
Published: 01 September 1960
...Michael Timko Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 THE “TRUE CREED” OF ARTHUR HUGH CLOUGH By MICHAELTIMKO “No doubt the greatest riddle to confront Clough during his life,” writes A. McKinley Terhune. “was that reflected in his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (1): 39–56.
Published: 01 March 1951
...Kingsbury Badger Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 ARTHUR HUGH CLOUGH AS DIPSYCHUS By KINGSBURYBADGER Arthur Clough, Dr. Arnold’s prize pupil at Rugby, came up to Oxford in 1837 with the Balliol scholarship and displayed unques- tionable...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 271–272.
Published: 01 September 1958
...S. K. Winther Frederick L. Mulhauser. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, 1957. Two volumes. Pp. xxiii + 656. $16.80. Copyright © 1958 by Duke University Press 1958 REVIEWS The Correspondence of Arthur Hugh Clough. Edited by FREDERICKL. MUL- HAUSER...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 June 1964
... University of North Carolina The Poetry of Clough: An Essay in Revaluation. By WALTERE. HOUGH- TON. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1963. Pp. xii + 236. $5.00. “New Insights and Old Assumptions” is the title of a section in Walter E. Houghton’s book, and it could well stand...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 227–228.
Published: 01 June 1964
... realism, and it is the latter which characterizes most of his poetry, especially the lyrics. Houghton’s remarks on the longer poems, especially the Amours and Dipsychus, illustrate vividly the way in which his failure to see the vital connection between Clough’s moral realism and his poetic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 272–273.
Published: 01 September 1958
... of the letters appeared. The unique contribution made by Frederick Mul- hauser is that he includes letters to Clough from his friends. Here is a collection of letters that does not leave the reader wondering, unsatisfied, and at times deeply irritated because he would like to know what X answered...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 405–407.
Published: 01 December 1978
... with poets-Clough (chap. 3) and Auden (chaps. 6 and 7who may be thought to have culti- vated just such virtues. Clough’s most interesting poetic achievement is the witty, conversational, antilyrical voice which he created for his spokesman 405 406...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (2): 215–217.
Published: 01 June 1983
..., and Tennyson. But he gets into stride only with the material after 1850, for in the early fifties he has found no fewer than three literary calls to write more about the city. The calls came from Kingsley, F. G. Stephens, and Arthur Hugh Clough. If of the three Clough’s call seems to have been...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (2): 212–215.
Published: 01 June 1983
... only with the material after 1850, for in the early fifties he has found no fewer than three literary calls to write more about the city. The calls came from Kingsley, F. G. Stephens, and Arthur Hugh Clough. If of the three Clough’s call seems to have been the most heeded, it is largely because...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 126–128.
Published: 01 March 1967
...” relationship. If the psychological attitudes of Arnold and Clough toward subscription of religious articles are contrasted, he demands to know of some “occasion” on which Arnold signed while Clough rudely refused the pen, and regales his readers with the fact that Arnold left Oriel before Clough...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (1): 86–101.
Published: 01 March 1964
... in the Church; others, including Blanco White, James A. Froude, Arthur Hugh Clough, and Francis W. Newman, left both the Church and the University when it required subscription to the Thirty-nine Articles. Some men spoke first with one voice and then with another: Thomas Cooper, the Chartist, was first...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (1): 79–81.
Published: 01 March 1989
... the separate chapters and that give the book the appearance of being a literary study. There are chapters on Clough’s Bothie, Tennyson’s Princess, Elizabeth Barrett Brown- ing’s Aurora Leigh, Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market, and Meredith’s Modem Love. Although Edmond does have initial things...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 317–319.
Published: 01 September 1979
... significant works were published: Carlyle’s Latter-Day Pamphleh, Francis Newman’s Phases of Faith, Charles Kingsley’s Alton Locke, and poetry by Arnold, Browning, and Clough. Other important events occurred during the year as well. Wordsworth died and Tennyson succeeded him as poet laureate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 273–275.
Published: 01 September 1960
... cspository prow. hit occnsioii;il!y lic)iigiitol; 271 Reviews includes a telling specimen from the poets (chiefly Tennyson, Arnold, and Clough) and from the novelists. He makes good use of such neglected works of fiction as North and South and Tom Brown...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (4): 458–471.
Published: 01 December 1966
... is a tone of superiority, an attitude of being somehow above these fellows. Occasionally, Alexander adopts a knowing manner of expression which is gratuitously nasty in its impli- cations: “Clough . . . refused to violate his conscience by continuing to subscribe to the Thirty-Nine Articles...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 248–263.
Published: 01 September 1961
... in virtually complete obscurity, one had little or no means of seeing the determining character of that experience. With the pub- lication of the Arnold-Clough correspondence,2 however, and the more recent publication of Arnold’s and with the sizable amount of critical scholarship done on him...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 41–55.
Published: 01 March 1952
... (London, lW), p. xxv. 2F. Max Miiller, Add Long Syne, First Series (New York, 1898), pp. 88-89. In his ?%omas Carlyle (London, 1884), p. 457, Froude wrote that he and his friend Arthur Clough both resigned their fellowships because they felt that, thinking as they did, they were “out...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 144–162.
Published: 01 June 1984
... of the poem. In a well-known letter to Clough (30 November 1853), he stressed its inferiority to “Sohrab and Rustum”: I am glad you like the Gipsy Scholar-but what does it do for you? Homer animates-Shakespeare animates-in its poor way I think Sohrab and Rustum animates-the Gipsy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 245–252.
Published: 01 September 1963
... Shaftesbury, to brand Tait a member of the “dangerous Arnoldian School.”18 In 1841 Matthew Arnold followed Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, Ben- jamin Jowett, Arthur Clough, and Frederick Temple in placing him- self under the tutelage of Tait at Balliol. Along with the tutor’s highly thought...