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cicero

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (2): 185–207.
Published: 01 June 1990
...Neal Wood Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 ∗ I wish to thank Ellen Meiksins Wood for so helpfully commenting on a draft of this essay. CICERO AND THE POLITICAL THOUGHT OF THE EARLY ENGLISH RENAISSANCE* BY NEAL WOOD...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (2): 144–166.
Published: 01 June 1990
...Janet Marion Martin Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 CICERO’S JOKES AT THE COURT OF HENRY I1 OF ENGLAND ROMAN HUMOR AND THE PRINCELY IDEAL By JANET MARION MARTIN The Saturnalia, by the fifth-century Roman...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (2): 167–184.
Published: 01 June 1990
... in the decades around 1400, humanism began to exert its influence on the sphere of Latin public rhetoric. Within decades humanistic discourse came to dominate public communication at the highest levels. Scholars of the Middle Ages knew from the Church fathers that Cicero excelled all other...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (2): 208–223.
Published: 01 June 1990
... this particular assault, mostly by intimidating some of the brightest teachers into leaving town. Less direct, more difficult to control than religious heresy- against which there were laws on the books, after all-was another major challenge, that of humanism. Cicero or Lucretius could...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 311–324.
Published: 01 December 1955
... education at Cambridge, could have escaped close contact with the works of such men as Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, Bacon, More, Elyot, Castiglione, Milton, Spenser, Shake- speare, Sidney, and Hooker; the principal works of all of these men were sold at the public auction of Wordsworth’s library...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (3): 393–396.
Published: 01 September 2015
... provide a bare overview of the main authors or works considered: chapters 4, 6, and 12, see below; chapter 5, Hyginus, the Bible, Foucault; chapter 7, Cicero, Horace, Ovid; chapter 8, medieval frescoes; chapter 9, Cicero, Agamben, Kant, Machiavelli; chapter 10, Luther, Descartes; chapter 11, Leibniz...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (2): 135–149.
Published: 01 June 1962
..., they gath- ered from the ancients-notably Cicero, Seneca, and Plutarch-lauda- tory phrases and epithets describing the salutary effect of philosophy in such terms as dulcis, suawis, and jucunda3 With these, the gram- mar-school-educated playwrights and playgoers would be familiar...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (3): 233–259.
Published: 01 September 2019
... the moderation of and distinction between ornamental figures (see Fitzgerald 2016 : 21–25). In book 1 of De oratore Cicero ( 1942a : 218) explains that an orator’s “ability to speak ought not to starve and go naked, but to be besprinkled and adorned [ aspersa atque distincta ] with a kind of charming variety...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 57–82.
Published: 01 March 1992
...- rowing from Cicero and late antique Ciceronian compendia, he states that eloquence and wisdom together constitute civil science, although he adds that eloquence plays the greater part in civil affairs. He also distinguishes rhetoric from logic, declaring that rhetoric is not to be considered...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (2): 221–243.
Published: 01 June 2008
... little outlet for their skills but in verse.9 In theory, Cicero reaffirmed the importance of an orator’sethos : in De oratore he stated both that “no man can be an orator complete in all points of merit, who has not attained a knowledge of all important subjects and arts” and that “the poet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 367–370.
Published: 01 September 1950
... of Newman’s mind. The first volume of Essays and Sketches begins with ;he “Personal and Lit- erary Character of Cicero” (1824) and the third volume ends with “An Internal Argument for Christianity” (1866). There is only one deviation from the chronological order, at the beginning of the third...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 225–228.
Published: 01 September 1962
... French translators during the fifteenth century. Between 1400 and 1418, he rendered into French Boccaccio’s De casibus virorum illush-ium, the Decam- eron, and possibly his De claris mulieribus; he also translated Cicero’s De senectute and De amicitia, Aristotle’s Economics, and perhaps...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 109–114.
Published: 01 March 1941
... in the Renaissance, Marsiglio Ficino’s Commentary on Pluto’s Symposiiirn Concerning Love or Cicero’s De Amicitia. Ficino begins his “Exhortation to Love. Concerning Simple and Mutual Love” by quoting Plato as saying, “The lover is a soul dead in its own body, living in a strange body,”s a remark...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 246–249.
Published: 01 June 2020
... not appear until 1775. Are our classics really the same as Shakespeare’s ancients? Bate calls Mark Antony’s famous “Friends, Romans, countrymen” speech in Julius Caesar “the most effective piece of Ciceronian rhetoric in [Shakespeare’s] entire canon” (120). So how is it that the smooth Antony—Cicero’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 248.
Published: 01 June 1950
... original plan, essentially unchanged. It was a program of teaching based upon the procedures and purposes of the ancient Roman schools which had educated Cicero and Ovid, and it was still designed to train a picked class of youths in grammar, logic, and rhetoric, which is to say...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (2): 101–104.
Published: 01 June 1990
... baggage to throw over- board is the educational ideology of Renaissance humanism. Proctor argues the opposite: that the malaise in higher education and the “crisis of the humanities” result from our forgetting their humanist foundations. Return to the Renaissance! To Cicero, Valla, Petrarch...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 333–352.
Published: 01 December 1952
... a Linguistic Point of View (Oslo, 1925), pp. 160ff.; Sir J. A. Frazer, The Golden Bough, 3rd edition (London, 1911-1915), 111, 318 ff. ; Cassirer, Language and Myth, pp. 44-62 ; Ogden and Richards, op. cit., pp. 27 ff. ; Langer, op. cit., p. 132. Note also: Herodotus, IX.92; Cicero, De Divinatione...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 262–270.
Published: 01 September 1958
... classical and Italian works into French, thus becoming the first to present to lay readers in France a knowledge of Boccaccio and Cicero. His translations con- sist of Cicero’s De senectute in 1405, De amicitiu in 1416, Aristotle’s Economics in 1418, and possibly Seneca’s De...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 123–129.
Published: 01 March 1941
... 14, 1572. It may there- fore be taken as representative of the academic teaching of the time. The speech is organized in accordance with the principles laid down by Cicero, but it is developed in the aureate style of the niedi- eval rhetorical tradition, To use the text-book terms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (4): 365–370.
Published: 01 December 1960
... translators in the fifteenth century. He produced numerous ren- ditions of classical and Italian works according to the methods of translation developed during his epoch, and he was the first to pre- sent to lay readers in France a coherent text of Boccaccio and Cicero. He translated Boccaccio’s De...