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chess

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 107–123.
Published: 01 June 1987
...Paul Yachnin Copyright © 1987 by Duke University Press 1987 A GAME AT CHESS THOMAS MIDDLETON’S “PRAISE OF FOLLY” By PAULYACHNIN Thomas Middleton’s Game at Chess might have been a play...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 27–47.
Published: 01 March 1943
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 121–122.
Published: 01 March 1945
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 578–579.
Published: 01 December 1940
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 579–580.
Published: 01 December 1940
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 579–580.
Published: 01 December 1940
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (1): 7–14.
Published: 01 March 1953
... neighbors and thus prepared both the characters in this play and the audience for a roaring comedy. Games of cards, chess, dice, and backgammon in other plays are of frequent occurrence and are employed for both serious and comic effects. Moreover, the recurrence of these episodes shows...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 141–143.
Published: 01 March 1941
... there are three previously unrecorded MSS described in Dr. Rosenbach’s recent catalog, English Plays to 1700: (1) Wil- liam Cartwright’s The RoyaZZ Slaw, 1636 ; (2) Thomas Middleton’s A Game at Chesse, with holograph title-page; and (3) another. MS of A Game att Chesse, dated 13 August 1624...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (3): 299–304.
Published: 01 September 1952
...)-not even in the use of the classical dance, which also attains a climax in the Fifth Book with the Greek dances at Entelechie and the Chess Ballet, the latter beautifully portraying the power of music over man’s emotions and actions. Rabelais’ use of musical concepts and doctrines...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 312–328.
Published: 01 September 1968
... honest). But two instances in the narrator’s presentation reveal the same kind of inconsistency. First, after he visits Paul Rechnoy (and misses the clue of the black chess knight Paul holds in his hand), he thinks to himself: Was not the image Pahl Pahlich had conjured up a trifle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (2): 177–192.
Published: 01 June 1975
... confi-onted him with the par- ticular pleasures of the cornposi tioii of’ chess problems aiicl their associa- tion with the pleasures of literary composition, stressing “oi-iginality” arid “Ileceit, to the point of cliabolisni” (p. 289). To the themes-or, as I have been calling them...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (3): 318–320.
Published: 01 September 1975
... lovers play chess in The Tempest, how does their game differ from Alice’s? Is Jane Fairfax in Emma a proto-Alice when Frank Churchill forces her into a humiliating word game? Is Albee’s “Get the Guests” a var- iant of snark-hunting, and does Nabokov’s taunting gamester God look like Carroll’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (3): 320–322.
Published: 01 September 1975
... what other imaginative writers meant by “play, games, and sport.” When the chastened and disciplined lovers play chess in The Tempest, how does their game differ from Alice’s? Is Jane Fairfax in Emma a proto-Alice when Frank Churchill forces her into a humiliating word game? Is Albee’s “Get...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (1): 63–82.
Published: 01 March 1997
... Land in Mrs. Dalloway also are of words, phrases, and lines whose sound Woolf admired apart from their sense. Clarissa Dalloway’s drawing room, for instance, is furnished with objects from the bedroom described at the beginning of “A Game of Chess”: “Lucy, coming into the drawing-room with her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 513–534.
Published: 01 December 1990
... to be? The only difference in Vondervotteimittiss is that its cottages are old Dutch. Even the pattern of red and black bricks on their walls, which is likened to a “chess-board upon a great scale”(2:367), was probably suggested by Melincourt, in par- ticular chapter 28, which depicts a chess dance...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 333–361.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Kenner reminds us that chess “is played with Queens and Pawns,” just as those hierarchically ordered figures form the dramatis personae of “A Game of Chess” in Eliot’s poem (152). So, too, does this incident in The Magic Toyshop hinge on such a hierarchy. On their way to see “the Queen...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (3): 355–383.
Published: 01 September 2014
... ]. Middleton Thomas . 2007 [ 1625 ]. A Game at Chesse . In The Collected Works , edited by Taylor Gary Lavagnino John , 1830 – 85 . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Mignolo Walter D. 2007 . “ What Does the Black Legend Have to Do with Race? ” In Rereading the Black Legend...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 94–98.
Published: 01 March 1968
... that would be meaningful to a popular audience, they were clearly purposive. Equally serious, it is extremely easy to move from the notion that art is a form of play in the sense of depending on an arbitrary set of conventions like the rules of chess, to the notion that art is play in the sense...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (3): 235–249.
Published: 01 September 1985
... the dreamer agrees to try “to make [the Knight] hool” (553) by listening to his “sorwes smerte” (555), the Knight explains how he is a mirror of grief: “For y am sorwe, and sorwe ys y” (597). He clzims that he has lost a chess game with Fortune, who has stolen his “fers,” his queen, and that he is now...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (1): 3–15.
Published: 01 March 1955
... to tradition when he let his miller squabble with the reeve. Because of his strategic position, the miller was often accused of theft. Of all the medieval works I have found mentioning him, only two try to defend him. One of these is the Schachzabelbuch, a long allegorical “Chess-Book...