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chariot

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 247–257.
Published: 01 September 1955
... dialogue of the Earth and the Moon, Ione and Panthea describe the chariots in which the spirits of these two cosmic bodies arrive upon the scene : the cloud chariot of the Spirit of the Moon and the whirling chariot, consisting of thousands of “inter- transpicuous” revolving spheres, forming...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (3): 375–387.
Published: 01 September 1965
... Mounted his shining chariot gilt with fire, And drawn with princely eagles through the path Pav’d with bright crystal and enchas’d with stars, When all the gods stand gazing at his pomp, So will I ride through Samarcanda streets, Until my soul...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 449–452.
Published: 01 December 1944
..., and possibly unique, description of Diana’s wind-blown scarf. DIANA IN HER CHARIOT Reproduced from Spence’s Polymetis (1747), Plate XXVI, 3. It happens that there are in Spence’s Polymetis several illustra- tions that might well give rise to the very comparison used...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 29–41.
Published: 01 March 1968
... Charioteer (Poetry, genial inspiration), Plutus- Faust (Wealth, not only material, but, more pertinently, the spiritual wealth that inspires creativity), its opposite Avarice-Mephisto,‘ and finally Pan-the Kaiser with his whole retinue. The scene presents the profound and mysterious alchemy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (1): 18–27.
Published: 01 March 1954
..., his oldest son.I8 In the last scene of Act IV and in two of the three scenes of Act V, Tamburlaine further exhorts his sons in the discipline of his way of life. The fourth act ends with the captive kings, harnessed like animals, drawing the chariot of their conqueror. Amyras asks his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 March 1945
... interesting’* in connection with the next word. (3) triumphant chariot; tabernacles : In the Mirror one of the most spectacular contrivances is a “Triumphant Chariot” carrying a “Tent, verie richlie wrought with golde and silke . . . and in the fore part of ye chariot . . . ther was in manner...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 197–210.
Published: 01 June 1945
...” he was placed in charge of the music for the performance.ls The relevant passages from his account are as follows : Then came the first chariot of the grand maskers, which was not so large as those which went before, but most curiously framed, carved, and painted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (4): 522–524.
Published: 01 December 2015
... enthusiastically envisions the Son of God’s fiery “Chariot of Paternal Deity”—a sublime chariot superseding all epic models—that defeats the rebel angels in book 6 and triumphs apocalyptically over them. And if we look outside Paradise Lost to Samson Agonistes (1671), we can discern a more complicated Milton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (2): 185–196.
Published: 01 June 1966
... the Chariot of the Son rushes on its course, no blow is struck against it. There can be no denial of Reality when it makes itself manifest, however inimical it may be to the state which a creature has chosen to bring about in himself. The only weapons exerted from the Chariot are the resistless ones...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (4): 535–541.
Published: 01 December 1942
..., while Memory shows him beautiful gardens and stately tombs, the memorials to famous princes who have bowed before death. While they are talking, they see a chariot drive by, and in it is Queen Elizabeth, “that splendent Rose so cleere” (ibid., Kathrine Koller...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 392–404.
Published: 01 December 1952
... where she was particularly worshipped). Virgil in Aeneid VI.781-87, had compared Rome in her pride and strength to this Berecynthian mother who as foundress of cities rides turret crowned through the Phrygian towns in her chariot pulled by lions: “qualis Berecynthia mater / Invehitur...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 342–354.
Published: 01 September 1947
... of a description of their games, the following couplet occurs : The love of Horses, which they had, alive, And care of Chariots, after Death survive. (VI,889 f.) Early in the first book of The Rape of the Lock, Ariel describes to Belinda in a dream...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 123–143.
Published: 01 June 1984
... the “Chariot of Paternal Deity” (6.750), first to end the war in heaven and then to create the new world to be inhabited by man. They offer two striking manifestations of the power of God, in one instance to destroy and in the other to create. On the third day of the war in heaven, the Son puts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (3): 365–367.
Published: 01 September 1992
... McGann finds highly important, but to restore a sense of proportion we might consider the lines “Or perhaps I should take up charioteering, or archery? / Or the practice of public speaking?” Compared to possible varia- tions in the linguistic codes (suppose Pound had waggishly left out the I...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (2): 215–217.
Published: 01 June 1994
... of Parthiana, the poi- soned arrow (which Milton does not), but there is no reference to chariots, elephants, pioneers, or wagons with supplies. Pompey’s description of the Parthians is actually just a small part of his speech (zg5-305), which is laced with self-importance and ends with typical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (2): 217–219.
Published: 01 June 1994
... of Parthiana, the poi- soned arrow (which Milton does not), but there is no reference to chariots, elephants, pioneers, or wagons with supplies. Pompey’s description of the Parthians is actually just a small part of his speech (zg5-305), which is laced with self-importance and ends with typical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (2): 179–181.
Published: 01 June 1982
..., as in the chapter on Presence, where Lieb examines the Shekinah, Ezek- iel’s throne-chariot, and symbolism of the Tabernacle, the reader feels something of the numinous. Here the book bursts out into sudden blaze. Yet I wonder whether on the whole Lieb has not succumbed to the very Protes- tant literalism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 108–110.
Published: 01 March 1946
... be multiplied, but the most prevalent abuse is the use of intransitive verbs transitively : . . . coheres our experience (p. 27) . . . they deteriorate us (p. 50) The chariot deteriorates the road (p. 53) . . . incandesces the spiritualized flesh (p. 126...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 March 1975
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (3): 363–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
... himself in Apollo’s chariot and compare him to Phoebus, who sees all things.21 Indeed, the Apollonian perspective has been put to various purposes on maps and in geographic writing throughout history. In some cases, as in Ortelius’s Typus orbis terrarum, the view of the earth from on high...