1-20 of 21 Search Results for

cenci

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1946) 7 (2): 249–250.
Published: 01 June 1946
...Kenneth Neill Cameron Arthur C. Hicks and R. Milton Clarke. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1945. Pp. 156. $3.50. Copyright © 1946 by Duke University Press 1946 Kcttneth N. Cameron 249 A Stage Version of Shelley’s “Cenci By ARTHURC. HICKSand...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2003) 64 (1): 71–96.
Published: 01 March 2003
...” (5:153) onstage and were infused with “a heroic and superior attitude that [they] would not have had” otherwise (4:31). Therefore, in mounting The Cenci at the Folies-Wagram theater in Paris in 1935 —it was the only play that the theater of cruelty actually produced—Artaud aimed to jar the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1945) 6 (3): 367–368.
Published: 01 September 1945
... Seventeenth Century England. Evanston : North- western University Studies in the Humanities, Number Nine, 1945. Pp. xi + 225. $4.00. Hicks, Arthur C., and Clarke, R. Milton. A Stage Version of Shelley’s Cenci. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers Ltd., 1945. Pp. 156. $3.50. Kahrl, George...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1946) 7 (2): 250–251.
Published: 01 June 1946
... nights. Nor do the editors quite seem to realize the importance of what they have established. Surely it is clear that once we realize that The Cenci is not a closet drama, but a stage play, the criteria for judging it change. It is no longer to be considered along with such obviously...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2014) 75 (2): 279–296.
Published: 01 June 2014
..., and even the controversial May 1886 private perfor- mance of Shelley’s Cenci was attended by many considered “friends” of society members. Five scholarly lectures were held in the first year at what became the society’s permanent meeting place, University College London.8 These lectures...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1994) 55 (3): 326–329.
Published: 01 September 1994
... mode of representation over another” (155). Cosmopolitanism, for example, is not simply a “mode of representation”; it is equally a choice of whom you represent and where. Having such a choice is itself a privilege, a fact Robbins faces unblinkingly: “There is no compla- cency. . . in admitting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1945) 6 (2): 197–210.
Published: 01 June 1945
... essentially an original play as The Cenci. From the sources-as with The Cenci-comes the framework only ; those qualities of charac- terization, conflict, and atmosphere which make the play, even in its fragmentary state, a living work of literature, come from Shel- ley’s own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1994) 55 (3): 329–333.
Published: 01 September 1994
... of representation”; it is equally a choice of whom you represent and where. Having such a choice is itself a privilege, a fact Robbins faces unblinkingly: “There is no compla- cency. . . in admitting that the privileges of the university are real and some- times useful, or that they depend on...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1984) 45 (1): 91–94.
Published: 01 March 1984
... aspect of the utopian “play” honored in Prometheus Unbound, should one adopt a moralistic tone in treating Count Cenci’s hedonism without sifting through the distinctions in kind Shelley clearly intended us to see? The most pervasive aspect of Scrivener’s dependence on the facile is his tendency...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1999) 60 (3): 413–418.
Published: 01 September 1999
... growth and cultural insight, but “support[ing] cornpla- cency” and thereby stultifying our development (31). His provocative ques- tions and analyses, presented in exhaustive, exciting historiographical detail, are sure to vex some but to educate all. Arac’s most important contribution is a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1970) 31 (4): 521–526.
Published: 01 December 1970
.... C 11I lent Pat r i c k . Spens er, M awe1 1, an(1 I< enaissan ce Pas t o rcil . CaIn bridge : H a rva rd U ti iversi ty Press, 1970. ix + 2 12 pp. $7.00. C urra n , St 11art . She1 ley’s “ Cenci”: Scorpions I< ingecf zu it h Fire. I’r i n ce ton : Pr i n ce to ti University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1966) 27 (1): 105–112.
Published: 01 March 1966
... Wesker. New York: Twayne Publishers, TEAS 28, 1965. 154 pp. $3.50. Ribner, Irving. The English History Play in the Age of Shakespeare. New York: Barnes & Noble, revised edition, 1965 (1957). xii + 356 pp. $6.75. Schaubert, Else von. Shelley’s Tragodie The Cenci und Marlowe’s Doppeldrama...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 425–437.
Published: 01 December 1950
.... 4e Idem. 47 Newman I. White, SheZley (New York, 1940), I, 521. 48 Ibid., I, 521-22. 436 Romantic Writers and Edmund Kean however, because of the acting of Miss Eliza O’Neill, whom he re- quested Peacock to try to secure for the production of The Cenci at Covent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1980) 41 (1): 38–53.
Published: 01 March 1980
... honor to Washington. He sent word that he was indisposed, but the men retired “with the greatest de- cency and regularity,” and other officers treated them generously with whisky, song, and dance. Three days later, “His Excellency dined with G Nox [General Henry Knox] and after dinner did us the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 43–58.
Published: 01 March 1941
..., Nur an meiner Liebe nicht ! Hoffmann was thirty-seven when he wrote this. Shelley was twenty- seven when he wrote The Cenci, the first edition of which now sells for two thousand dollars. Hardly had he completed his tale of Milo the monkey when Hoffmann took up, from Cervantes, Berganza...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 54–66.
Published: 01 March 1972
... Plotinus Plinlimmon” (p. go)? Is it Pierre who insists “that never,, never would he be able to em- brace Isabel with the mere brotherly embrace” (p. 94)? Does Pierre really see Guido’s The Cenci at a gallery? Is the narrator of “Bartleby” “none other than Washington Irving” (p. 122)? Is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2009) 70 (3): 363–386.
Published: 01 September 2009
... (Hilda’s copy of Guido’s portrait of Beatrice Cenci), the other a sculpture (Kenyon’s of Cleopatra). But this does not imply a stable opposition of subject and object — of artist and model — according to the categories of gender: while Kenyon sculpts Hilda’s hands, he also makes a bust of Donatello...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1996) 57 (3): 425–448.
Published: 01 September 1996
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1979) 40 (3): 275–291.
Published: 01 September 1979
... conscientious to a degree which rendered him in- capable of a sordid or oblique action” (Memoirs, 111, 53). Translated to the sphere of action on the religious question, Harrowby’s essential de- cency led him to support Catholic claims as early as 18 12. He spoke and voted in their favor in 1823 and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1983) 44 (3): 267–284.
Published: 01 September 1983
... Beatrice Cenci; what interested him in a still life was the materiality of the objects, the microscopic precision that he found in the work of the minor Dutch masters” (pp. 94-95).17Yet, less than two months 1’ The portrait of Beatrice in The Marble Faun is unique in this respect: “It is a...