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celia

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 383–399.
Published: 01 December 1964
... as “estates” who provide specific demon- stration of Jonson’s thesis about gold and society. Celia and Bonario, like Heavenly Man or Just or Faithful Few, function as virtuous figures whose behavior provides a standard by which to judge the world of the play; and, even more important, their fates...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 135–148.
Published: 01 June 1961
... postulate. Celia evidently represents those exceptional few who are able to attain the consummation of this “formula” for salvation : complete religious fulfillment. But what is the status of those who are unable to attain it; is their lot invariably to be the protracted misery...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (3): 448–461.
Published: 01 September 1965
... seven characters (Jo-Lea, Monty, Jack and Celia Harrick, Brother Sumpter, Nick, Bingham). Two minor characters (Nick’s wife and Dorothy Cutlick) achieve less, but their efforts are also less intense. One minor character (Mrs. Bingham) and one major (Isaac) make “wrong” peaces...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (3): 233–242.
Published: 01 September 1959
..., it is the folly of the suitors for Volpone’s wealth, whose pretensions to cleverness are also exposed as absurd; at the next, the folly of Volpone and Mosca, who are deceived by their own clever- ness; and finally, in Celia (and Bonario) we see perhaps a distant reminiscence of the “folly” of Lear’s Fool...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 124–144.
Published: 01 June 1987
... The concluding line of “Cassinus and PeterOh! Celia, Celia, Celia shits”3-connects that poem to “The Lady’s Dressing Rooni” (1732) in which the same line occurs (1 18). Here I deal with these poems and also with “A Panegyric on the Dean,” a scatological poem written around 1730. More explicitly than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 61–63.
Published: 01 March 1946
...Helge Kökeritz Copyright © 1946 by Duke University Press 1946 TOUCHSTONE IN ARDEN AS YOU LIKE IT, 11, iv, 16 By HELGEKOKERITZ When the runaway trio Rosalind, Celia, and Touchstone eventually arrive in the Forest of Arden...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (1): 3–19.
Published: 01 March 1969
... which should make us pause. It is written to Celia, his Celia-and every verse ends with the mad, maddened refrain: ‘But-Celia, Celia, Celia shitsl’ Now that, stated baldly, is so ridiculous it is almost funny. But when one remembers the gnashing insanity to which the great mind of Swift...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1950
...-blooded quality of their lines, as Jonson rarely does. This will be seen by comparing the opening lines of Jonson’s “Song to Celia” 1 In “TheRenaissance Forerunners of the Neo-Classic Lyrics,” MLN, LXII (1947), 314-15, Herbert W. Schueller illustrates aptly the usual Renaissance...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (2): 113–135.
Published: 01 June 1991
... Oliver or deprive him of his rights by primogeniture. Touchstone refers to Celia’s father, the younger brother who has 6 Accounts of time in As You Like It outside the Halio-Wilson-Taylor line of argument and different from my reading of the play are given by Frederick Turner, Shakespeare...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 23–29.
Published: 01 March 1972
... “love” too far. Hut self-love is a common term to all three of the splendid comedians of the piece. Celia and Bonario can be brought into the “central theme” of “folly” in Volpone because in them “we see perhaps a distant reminiscence of the ‘folly’ of Lear’s Fool, which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 151–157.
Published: 01 June 1963
..., but it is only in the fifth act, when he feigns death and his agent turns antagonist, that Impostor gains dominance over Ironical Buf- foon. It is significant that when, in III.vii, Volpone attempts to seduce Celia, we have a temporary change in the tone of the play. At this point, irony...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 313–314.
Published: 01 September 1963
..., Trafalgar, 1873, is related to the last, Ca‘novas, 1912. Yet, Trafalgar is actually bound up with La Fontam de Oro and El Audaz, and Ca’novas with El caballero encantado and Celia m 10s infiernos. Thus Valverde’s metaphor of the mountain ranges, which Hinter- h5user accepts as correct, seems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1963
... with El caballero encantado and Celia m 10s infiernos. Thus Valverde’s metaphor of the mountain ranges, which Hinter- h5user accepts as correct, seems to me to be mistaken. ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (3): 299–311.
Published: 01 September 1945
... on the edition of his works by C. H. Herford and Percy and Evelyn Simpson, Oxford, 1925 306 Tmgicomcdy of Hzr trrors cent victims. Corvino’s wife, Celia, suffers as much from his jeal- ousy and greed as from Volpone’s sensuality, and on the occasion of .Volpone’s attempted seduction...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 179–184.
Published: 01 June 1941
....’J22That he is also good to look upon must have been at once apparent on the stage, and may be inferred in the text from the attitude of Celia and Rosalind. Ap- parently, moreover, his hair was reddish brown;2s and this color was associated with the sanguine type.24 This humor...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (2): 211–216.
Published: 01 June 1986
... and with an introduction by Carolyn L. Karcher. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Univer- sity Press, American Women Writers Series, 1986. xliv + 245 pp. $30.00, cloth; $7.95, paper. Cooke, Rose Terry. “How Celia Changed Her Mind”and Selected Stories. Edited and with an introduction by Elizabeth Ammons. New...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (4): 395–403.
Published: 01 December 1982
... virtue in adversity and portrays it as embattled (chap. 4) forms a persuasive answer to those critics who blame such figures as the Germanicans in Sejanus and Celia and Bonario in VoZ- pone for being helpless and naive. There are also some good insights in chapter 5 about judgment, transformation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (3): 316–325.
Published: 01 September 1985
... to intelligent but unscrupulous central characters, and if a few good fellows appear, they are presented as naive and inarticulate like Bonario and Celia. In The Alchemist, Epicoene, and Bartholomew Fair no ideal moral figures appear; all are examples of vice in varying degrees. According to Maus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (4): 402–408.
Published: 01 December 1987
...: Princeton University Press, 1987. xxiv + 277 pp. $19.95. ROMANCELANGUAGES Britton, Celia. Claude Simon: Writing the Visible. Cambridge and New York: Cam- bridge University Press, Cambridge Studies in French, 1987. vi + 234 pp. $44.50. Cohn, Robert Greer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 259–266.
Published: 01 September 1951
... of lyric verse in the Restoration period, seems a bit beyond Hickes’s range.2o 18 Athenue Oxottienses, 111, 490. 19 See “Was ever man so vexed with a wife” (OD)and “Was ever man so vexed with a trull” (WD); “When first I did Clarissa see” (OD), “When first I saw my Celia’s face...