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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 379–381.
Published: 01 September 1947
... for Several Years As also the Deliverances which I have Cause to Give The Glory to God Forever. Foreword by H. M. TOMLINSON.Edited by E. H. W. MEYERSTEIN.New York and London : Oxford University Press, 1946. Pp. xxxviii + 190. $2.50. The seafaring life of Cromwellian and Stuart days...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (2): 181–190.
Published: 01 June 1985
... University Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1984. 210 pp. $26.50. THE CAUSE OF THUNDER’ By JOHN REIBETANZ In The Anatomy of Melancholy, Burton asks, “Who made so soft and peaceable a creature, born to love, mercy, meekness, so...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 601–605.
Published: 01 December 1965
...R. W. B. Lewis Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 THE EMERSON CAUSE‘ By R. W. B. LEWIS “Emerson,” writes Jonathan Bishop at the start of his excellent study, “is still our good old cause,” and the head and fount of what...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 351–372.
Published: 01 September 2012
... to ideology and reality and the artist’s problematic role in representing either the murders or their structural causes. Deckard argues that 2666 is a “world-system novel” that reformulates realist aesthetics to interrogate the ideological nature of art and the limits of realism while encoding the conditions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2022) 83 (3): 275–302.
Published: 01 September 2022
... of the art of bel canto: “As to the castrati , they vanished, and the usage disappeared in the creation of new customs. That was the cause of the irretrievable decay of the art of singing.” This essay focuses on the eighteenth-century castrato Gasparo Pacchierotti—friend of Charles, Frances, and Susan Burney...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 559–600.
Published: 01 December 1941
... appointment and kings who have not is ef- faced by the doctrine of “First Cause” and “Second Causes” as in- terpreted and applied by Salmasius. God, it was agreed, works indirectly as well as directly. Some- times he manifests his will by creation or miracle, or by inspiration...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (2): 125–136.
Published: 01 June 1954
... but one step beyond the immediate sensible qualities of things, we go out of our depth.” And for this reason Burke believes it possible, “by looking into physical causes . . . to give taste a sort of philosophical solidity” (IV, i, 243; “Preface,” p. ix). Attempting therefore to be simple...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 109–110.
Published: 01 March 1945
... to be the cause and the foundation of Romanticism, at least in gardening. Unfortu- nately, however, some of the initiators of the new “natural” school seem never to have gone to Italy; and, furthermore, the Grand Tour had been a commonplace of aristocratic education for at least two hundred years...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (1): 21–37.
Published: 01 March 1980
... flow lines of ponderation and subtlety to the entities which surround it; that is, to the adjacents which crown it, such as are its causes, its effects, attributes, qualities, contingencies, circum- stances of time, place, and mode, etc., and to other corresponding terms whatever...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (3): 291–292.
Published: 01 September 1943
... quoted from canto 34 of the Orlando (with some emen- dations) in Of Reformation in England (London, 1641 and be- cause he wrote in the margin of his personal copy2 “Quest0 libro due volte 10 letto, Sept. 21, 1642.” [I have read this (46th) book twice.] In The Reason of Church...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1941
... change is due to three main forces : 1, assimilation ; 2, reaction against assimilation ; 3, the need for forcefulness. The interplay of these three forces is generalized in the state- ment (p. 3) : “Linguistic change is caused by assimilation and the reaction against assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 1945
..., seems to be the cause and the foundation of Romanticism, at least in gardening. Unfortu- nately, however, some of the initiators of the new “natural” school seem never to have gone to Italy; and, furthermore, the Grand Tour had been a commonplace of aristocratic education for at least two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 131–139.
Published: 01 June 1964
... the organ upright. Here is a definition of the disease. Cardiaca is a tremulous motion of the heart, more than is natural, caused by fear, distress, or sorrow. But the cardiaca known as syncope is a failure of sensation and motion throughout the entire body (for the greater part...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 502–503.
Published: 01 December 1946
... was caused by a falling off in the guilds which produced them. The sole explanation given here is that leaders of Reformation policy in England suppressed the plays for political reasons and largely against the people’s will. The similar decay of the old drama in France and Germany is laid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 232–233.
Published: 01 June 1951
... of that system). To summarize : Bacon uses Revelation to deny the discoverability of a Prime Mover and the first non-caused cause. (Since God made the world, His stamp is on any discoverable first cause.) Through study of the forms, processes, and schemes of nature man can discover God’s art...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (4): 381–386.
Published: 01 December 1954
... of dualist metaphysics and apologetics ; how its central idea-that matter and its inherent modes of behavior have brought about all things according to necessary mechani- cal law-led inevitably to the discarding of Providence and intelligent final causes, and to a consequent naturalism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 292–309.
Published: 01 September 1951
... and then by a series of actions with a view to be freed from it. As Captain Booth asserts that “every man acted entirely from that passion which was uppermost,” Franklin asserts that uneasiness, the sole source of all our desires and passions, is “the first Spring and Cause of all Actions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 164–168.
Published: 01 June 1950
... of the arguments of fatalism and man’s conversion into a machine. The second, advanced by Man- sel, the antagonist of Stuart Mill, stresses the arguments of fatalism and the testimony of the moral conscience : To suppose that all motions of our bodies are necessary and caused by me- chanical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 231–232.
Published: 01 June 1951
... and the first non-caused cause. (Since God made the world, His stamp is on any discoverable first cause.) Through study of the forms, processes, and schemes of nature man can discover God’s art, but not His nature. The physics that will ascend to metaphysics, and discover the summary law...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 49–61.
Published: 01 March 1940
...- tain principles applied throughout the History. First, God is above nature, which is never more than a second cause, the agent by which God works his inscrutable purposes. This dominating idea is given explicit statement in the Preface: “I do also account it not the meanest...