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bolingbroke

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 1944
...Roland B. Botting Copyright © 1944 by Duke University Press 1944 BOLINGBROKE AND MURPHY’S ABOULCASEM By ROLANDB. BOTTING Students of mid-eighteenth-century literary affairs are aware that Mallet’s publication of a posthumous edition of Bolingbroke’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 177–184.
Published: 01 June 1948
...Irving Ribner Copyright © 1948 by Duke University Press 1948 BOLINGBROKE, A TRUE MACHIAVELLIAN By IRVINGRIBNER The Elizabethan manuscript translation of The Prince, edited by Hardin Craig,l calls attention to the need for investigation of a new...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (1): 81–88.
Published: 01 March 1985
..., the qualities of a public-relations man and a fugitive-or seems, as he quips when concluding the “Epistle to Bolingbroke” (Epistles of Horace, I.i), “half in Heav’n-except (what’s mighty odd) / A Fit of Vapours clouds this Demi-god” (187-88). The vapors offer a broad screen for projection...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (1): 34–45.
Published: 01 March 1964
... Richard ZZ is the disparity between external word or action and in- ternal meaning or m0tive.l The efforts of Richard to effect a recon- ciliation between Bolingbroke and Mowbray (I.i), Richard’s feigned impartiality when he presides over the field at Coventry, the equally vehement claims...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 201–204.
Published: 01 June 1979
... in such lines as “Content with just heredi- tary Sway” (521). But Aden wants to go further and find full-scale political alle- gory. In Book 8, he says, the Greeks are the Tories, the Trojans are the Whigs, Ulysses is Bolingbroke, Nestor is Oxford, Diomedes is “Tory desperation” (p, 160), Hector...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 142–157.
Published: 01 June 1960
... specifies his cowardly acts and contrasts his deeds with the valiant conduct expected of the Knights of the Garter. The King’s decree bitingly bestows shame and removes knighthood. No comfort is offered, or expected, for Fastolfe. In Richard II, Bolingbroke’s decree for the Bishop of Carlisle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 111–112.
Published: 01 March 1963
... the play exercises over moral doctrine and intuitive response. Bolingbroke’s response is that “our scene is alt’red from a serious thing, / And now chang’d to ‘The Beggar and the King”’ (V.iii.77-78). Through the presence of the Duchess who is not in the sources, York becomes a comic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 112–114.
Published: 01 March 1963
... response. Bolingbroke’s response is that “our scene is alt’red from a serious thing, / And now chang’d to ‘The Beggar and the King”’ (V.iii.77-78). Through the presence of the Duchess who is not in the sources, York becomes a comic figure in the play. His plea against his son’s treason...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 196–199.
Published: 01 June 1984
... are too remiss; Whilst Bolingbroke, through our security, Grows strong and great in substance and in power. (III.ii.27-35) Providence has the initiative and control in the Bishop’s words; Richard is in God’s hands and need...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (3): 305–316.
Published: 01 September 1967
... as “a versification of the most genuine creed of the time; of that Deism which took various shapes with Clarke, Tindal, and Shaftesbury, and which Bolingbroke seem to have more or less put into shape to be elaborated into poetry by his friend David Daiches sums up the verdicts of many present-day...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 366–367.
Published: 01 December 1956
...” method-you drop in a motive and out comes an action. He finds, for instance, that in Richavd ZZ plot and characterization unfold integrally. The niairi facts of the plot, Richard’s fall and Bolingbroke’s rise, were given Shakespeare. He makes them into tragedy of stature through his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (3): 246–256.
Published: 01 September 1974
... to these destructive Animosities, and, without distinction, unite in pursuing the true Interest of our Coun- try.”g Tories in the Opposition, like Bolingbroke and Bathurst, had fewer hopes of ever taking Walpole’s place and thus, perhaps, spoke more philosophically, as Bolingbroke did particularly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (3): 300–303.
Published: 01 September 1981
... and satires fall neatly into two patterns, or that the epistle to Fortescue, which Horace calls a “satire,” is markedly different from the epistle to Bolingbroke. Where Bogel sees clear patterns, I would see a continuing and unresolved de- bate, in satires and epistles, between conflicting impulses...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 292–309.
Published: 01 September 1951
... from the personality of its author, as a reflection of philosophical notions commonly held in the eighteenth century and as a refutation-worthy to be compared with the comments of Hutcheson, Bolingbroke, and other philosophers-of Wollaston’s influential treatise. A survey of the latter must...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (4): 411–442.
Published: 01 December 2005
... of the two main patrons of Philips, Robert Harley and Henry St. John (now raised to the peerage as Oxford and Bolingbroke). He was also on intimate terms with Simon Harcourt by 1715. Among those celebrated in Cyder is Viscount Scudamore, Tory MP for Here­ fordshire at this time (1.509). See Cyder...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (3): 367–376.
Published: 01 September 1949
... keynoted the critics’ attitude with his famous Vex-the-world-rather-than-divert-it letter, with his injunction to Pope to “give the world one lash the more” at his request. Moreover, Swift’s apparently misanthropic intent had already caused his friends some alarm. Bolingbroke (getting his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (1): 86–101.
Published: 01 March 1964
... and scriptural evidence to support traditional Christian creeds.16 Conyers Middleton, Lord Bolingbroke, Edward Gibbon, and Joseph Priestley were the Englishmen who, with their critical historical method, first seriously questioned the historical bases of orthodox Christian beliefs. When...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 184.
Published: 01 June 1948
...G. Blakemore Evans Copyright © 1948 by Duke University Press 1948 184 Bolingbroke, a True Machiavellian If we accept this thesis as true, many problems arise. Was this parallel accidental, or was it intentional? Had Shakespeare read The Prince in one of the Elizabethan...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 249.
Published: 01 June 1950
..., subject only to human fallibility. All admirers of the Review shall here-. after list him among those scholars who, as Bolingbroke says, “enable others to study with greater ease and to purposes more useful.” OSCARSHERWIN Cify...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 13–20.
Published: 01 March 1945
.... 831. Cf. Laurence Echard, The Htstory of England (London, 1707), p. 787. 4Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, A Collection of Several Tracts (Lon- don, 1727), pp. 236-37. Herbert Weisinger 15 meet them; Bolingbroke finds nothing...