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boccaccio

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (1): 3–20.
Published: 01 March 1981
...Walter R. Davis Copyright © 1981 by Duke University Press 1981 BOCCACCIO’S DECAMERON THE IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY FORM By WALTERR. DAVIS A key to the concerns of the novella-especially the novella as devel- oped by Boccaccio-lies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 573–575.
Published: 01 December 1940
...Charlegso Ggio Rutledge Gordon Silber, Menasha, Wisconsin: George Banta Publishing Co., 1940. Pp. 162. Copyright © 1940 by Duke University Press 1940 Charles Goggio 573 The Influence of Dante and Petrarch on Certain of Boccaccio’s Lyrics...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 493–494.
Published: 01 December 1964
... Angeles: University of California Press, 1963. x + 250 pp. $6.00. With this book Aldo D. Scaglione makes a signal contribution to many aspects of literary inquiry. He places Boccaccio’s masterpiece in the his- torical context of an agelong struggle on the part of both the pagan and Christian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 304–309.
Published: 01 December 1956
...Patricia M. Gathercole Copyright © 1956 by Duke University Press 1956 TWO OLD FRENCH TRANSLATIONS OF BOCCACCIO’S DE CASIBUS VIRORUM ILLUSTRIUM By PATRICIAM. GATHERCOLE Laurent de Premierfait, a ranking translator of the fifteenth cen- tury...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (4): 365–370.
Published: 01 December 1960
... translators in the fifteenth century. He produced numerous ren- ditions of classical and Italian works according to the methods of translation developed during his epoch, and he was the first to pre- sent to lay readers in France a coherent text of Boccaccio and Cicero. He translated Boccaccio’s De...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 297–308.
Published: 01 December 1962
... that he may have abandoned Boccaccio’s division of the Filostrato into a proem and nine parts in order to follow the five-act structure of classical drama;’ but according to T. W. Baldwin, there was no understanding of this form during the Middle Ages and early Renais- sance.2 Thus, to assume...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 262–270.
Published: 01 September 1958
... classical and Italian works into French, thus becoming the first to present to lay readers in France a knowledge of Boccaccio and Cicero. His translations con- sist of Cicero’s De senectute in 1405, De amicitiu in 1416, Aristotle’s Economics in 1418, and possibly Seneca’s De...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 494–496.
Published: 01 December 1964
...Stephen Orcel John Stevens. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1963. xvii + 483 pp. $5.00. Copyright © 1964 by Duke University Press 1964 494 REVIEWS hand, Boccaccio’s “naturalism” does not deny a priori the forms of civilized...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 494–496.
Published: 01 December 1964
..., Boccaccio’s “naturalism” does not deny a priori the forms of civilized society (like the marriage bond) if they channel and promote love. Scaglione claims that Boccaccio’s naturalism involved an originally irrationalistic stand in erotic matters and that Boccaccio’s attitude led to a “conciliatory...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (3): 253–271.
Published: 01 September 1986
.... In IsubeZZu the contrast between the spiritual and the material appears in various forms and results in a grotesque vision. Based on a story in Boccaccio’s Decumeron (Day 4, Story 5),22 the poem tells of two lovers, Isabella and Lorenzo, whose brief idyll ends when Isabella’s greedy brothers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 221–234.
Published: 01 June 1942
... regarded as “bestes feibles et variables.” This prompted a storm of protest in France. The Italian polygraph, Giovanni Boccaccio, in the fourteenth century writes a violent diatribe against a widow who had made a public laughing-stock of him, and attacks the entire feminine sex...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 259–264.
Published: 01 September 1946
..., Chaucer unconsciously echoed the earlier one, consciously recollected it, or deliberately adapted it with his eye on the text. The House of Fume Invocation was woven to- gether from thoughts and phrases found in Dante’s Infernozs and par ad is and Boccaccio’s Teseida, xi.15...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1983
... of and about literature, his focus is on a few major pieces of narrative fiction by a handful of prominent poets- chiefly Ovid, Boccaccio, Chaucer. He argues that each of these writers, in different ways, created characters who were more than the typical figures called for in classical rhetorical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 225–228.
Published: 01 September 1962
... French translators during the fifteenth century. Between 1400 and 1418, he rendered into French Boccaccio’s De casibus virorum illush-ium, the Decam- eron, and possibly his De claris mulieribus; he also translated Cicero’s De senectute and De amicitia, Aristotle’s Economics, and perhaps...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (1): 100–102.
Published: 01 March 1991
... focus to the widespread appearance of the Ovidian lovers in works by Jean de Meun, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machaut, and Froissart, she then argues that the best source for understanding the conventional meaning of these figures is found neither in the classical material itself nor in the mythographic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (2): 273–275.
Published: 01 June 1998
..., Boccaccio, Vasari, and Shakespeare, which Lupton examines later in the book. One of the most surprising and potentially sub- versive aspects of her analysis is the uncovering of a resistant yet generative Jewish remainder in the cultural self-construction of Renaissance art and literature. I...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (4): 404–405.
Published: 01 December 1982
... for the rate at which one idea (say, God-in-the-world) recedes before another (Man-in-the-world). Almost one-third of the book is taken up by the conclusion, the critical survey of past Boccaccio studies, the notes, and the index. Potter traces such terms as “liminality,” “metanarrative,” and frame...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 23–40.
Published: 01 March 1992
... have been the appropriate first holder of a chair in Chaucer studies (his interest in Chaucer is surely more aca- demic than Boccaccio’s was in Dante). To be quite frank, Lydgate is one of us. Instead of kissing the steps trod by Virgil, Ovid, Homer, Lucan, and Statius, he is more easily...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 391–400.
Published: 01 September 1942
... comments on so sweeping and stirring a movement as the Renaissance in Italy (as represented by Boccaccio and Petrarch) and its influence on Chau- cer have been. Here is a statement about the Anthology in this connection : “Wie Moschopules, Planudes etc., so sind auch die Schonredner dieser...