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Published: 01 September 2021
Figure 1. Installments 1–2 (chaps. 1–7) of Bleak House . The longest network diameter connects the four-sided nodes (beginning at Lady Dedlock and ending at Mr. Swallow). The dashed line represents written communication. Bracketed characters have had interactions but not yet been identified More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (3): 289–298.
Published: 01 September 1972
...Michael Steig; F. A. C. Wilson Copyright © 1972 by Duke University Press 1972 HORTENSE VERSUS BUCKET THE AMBIGUITY OF ORDER IN BLEAK HOUSE By MICHAELSTEIG and F. A. C.WILSON Contrast enough between Mr...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (3): 309–312.
Published: 01 September 1978
... and Joseph Andrews, it may as well be the mode of Humphry Clinker too. THOMASLOCKWOOD University of Washington Dickens on the Romantic Side of Familiar Things: “Bleak House” and the Novel Tradition. By ROBERTNEWSOM. New York...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 315–343.
Published: 01 September 2021
...Figure 1. Installments 1–2 (chaps. 1–7) of Bleak House . The longest network diameter connects the four-sided nodes (beginning at Lady Dedlock and ending at Mr. Swallow). The dashed line represents written communication. Bracketed characters have had interactions but not yet been identified...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (2): 123–144.
Published: 01 June 2018
... ends with the goddess rushing off to Parliament and the powerless poet left behind in a bleak, coastal setting. Later in the century the importance of Britannia faded, but the patterns established in earlier texts continued. Anna Seward’s 1781 Monody on Major Andrè retains some features...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (3): 293–315.
Published: 01 September 1975
... of urban and rural imagery is an essential element in his work from Bleak House on; and the prose devoted to pastoral themes in The Mystery of Edwin Drood is unsurpassed in his entire canon. I should like in this essay to examine a number of passages from the later novels that show Dickens’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 545–557.
Published: 01 December 1965
...William Axton Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 THE TROUBLE WITH ESTHER By WILLIAMAXTON Although Charles Dickens clearly intended Esther Summerson for the heroine of Bleak House, many readers have found her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 June 2018
... “on and with” Tennyson’s In Memoriam (1850) in her own A Voice from the South (1892; 11); later authors, editors, and intellectuals “build on and respond to prior African Americanizations” of individual works (33), as when Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1852–53) is reprinted in Frederick Douglass’ Paper...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (4): 383–386.
Published: 01 December 1980
.... The apparently baggy books, like Vanity Fair, Bleak House, or Middlemarch, are rigorously unified after all, largely through thematic rele- vance and patterns of analogical movement. This sort of justification is clearly sanctioned by the texts and what we can find out about the novelists’ intentions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (3): 306–309.
Published: 01 September 1978
... University of Washington Dickens on the Romantic Side of Familiar Things: “Bleak House” and the Novel Tradition. By ROBERTNEWSOM. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977. xiv i-173 pp. $12.00. In his brief monograph Robert Newsom addresses the single most impor- tant critical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (3): 295–307.
Published: 01 September 1964
.... Snobb are little more than flat, comically labeled caricatures. Superficially, Mr. Chadband in Bleak House may strike some readers as something similar-as little more than a typical Dickensian extravagance. A comic name, vaguely echoic, promises nothing very profound. Yet, on closer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (3): 386–401.
Published: 01 September 1969
... throughout Dickens’ novels. (For ob- vious reasons, it is not a technique that benefits by repetition in a single book.) In Bleak House, for example, it is Esther whose problem- atical character is translated into dream figures. When she lies feverish with the smallpox, she imagines herself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (1): 125–127.
Published: 01 March 2017
..., Flaubert (via Lukács) is the hinge that enables her to read from Romola to Daniel Deronda with attention to Eliot’s awareness of historicism as a hedge against the bleakness of naturalism. Romola portrays the negative impact of global capital on sovereignty by making “adultery the sign of heirloom...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (1): 123–126.
Published: 01 March 2021
... of Bleak House and other major Dickens novels is that of a transformatist natural history . . . congruent with the Lamarckian-Geoffroyan synthesis popularized in the Vestiges , more than it is with Charles Darwin’s account” (127). The result is a revised understanding of Dickens’s aesthetic, in which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 203–205.
Published: 01 June 1972
... or qualified the author’s argument in particular chapters. Much of what is said about analogical method in the earlier chapters on Pickwick, Oliver Twist, and Martin Chuzzlewit can be found in Marcus and elsewhere, as that on Dombey in Kathleen ‘I’illotson and that on Bleak House in W. J.Harvey, M...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (3): 369.
Published: 01 September 1948
... the Autobiography “amusing frankness.” Mr. Sadleir labels it “this queer bleak text-book of the mechanics and economics of novel-writing.” Swinburne, who can al- ways be depended upon, pronounced it “exquisitely comical and con- scientiously coxcombical.” Professor Booth feels that its readers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (3): 257–271.
Published: 01 September 1974
... Juan). (4) as an indifferent world of bleak masses and solids, of an infinity of worlds, unfathomable, other than which there is emptiness, nothing- ness, meaninglessness; a world that will ultimately sweep away man and his works and leave nothing except a wasteland; beyond this world...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 110–111.
Published: 01 March 1967
... a better novel than Esmond because in it Scott has found a structural form that is perfectly adapted both to the experience he has to render and to his mode of conceiving that experience” (p. 205). This essay and its successor, a careful study of symbol and point of view in Bleak House, reveal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (3): 301–302.
Published: 01 September 1984
... is the way ofsalvation. Her weeping resembles the lanien- tations and repentance of Ololon in Milton and the weepings and gnashings of Los for Albion in Jerusalem. The same bleak reasoning of the despairing and dying youth in “The Couch” can be seen in “Contemplation,” but here there is no loving...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (3): 239–261.
Published: 01 September 1988
... rate, of the atmosphere in which she is introduced. The word “dropsical” (p. 331) appears in both de- scriptions, as do the words “particles” and “substance”; there is, as well, the pervading sense of disintegration: The day dawned bleak and chill, a moving wall of grey light out...