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bird

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Published: 01 June 2019
Figure 2. Illustration of the evolution of the embryo of the bird, from the cicatricula (the point in the yolk of an egg from which the embryo is formed) to the appearance of the vertebral nuclei. Plate 68 of Owen 1840 . Emerson could have encountered this volume on his tours of the Museum of More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2009) 70 (3): 341–362.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Thomas DiPiero Beginning in the mid-seventeenth century, thinkers in various disciplines evoked birds and other animals that appeared able to talk to make points about language use and human reason and identity. Talking birds initially allowed philosophers to draw parallels between language and the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1960) 21 (1): 45–58.
Published: 01 March 1960
...R. A. Durr Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 VAUGHAN’S PILGRIM AND THE BIRDS OF NIGHT “THE PROFFER” By R. A. DURR “The Proffer” is distinguished among Vaughan’s poems. It strikes and sustains a note seldom heard in his work...
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
, reptiles, birds, and mammals, and also of man” (87). Figure 1. Vertebrate endoskeletons. Plate 1 of Owen 1849: 120. Owen’s vertebrate archetype is illustrated at the top right; the rest of the plate shows, Owen explains, “the modifications of [the archetype] characteristic of the four great divisions of More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1963) 24 (2): 177–180.
Published: 01 June 1963
... Thrush moderate sized grayish brown bird sings oftener after sundown sometimes quite [ ?] in the night is very secluded...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1943) 4 (2): 235–236.
Published: 01 June 1943
...Arnold C. Rowbotham C. Wesley Bird. Los Angeles: Lymanhouse, 1941. Pp. 183. © 1943 University of Washington 1943 Edward F. Meylan 235 In short, a brilliant piece of work, marred only by occasional abstruseness and verbosity. It would take...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1949) 10 (3): 351–355.
Published: 01 September 1949
... itself, or is it only the remnant of a longer series? (2) What is the bird of the fragment ? There has been no unanimous decision. 1 See A. S. Cook, The Old English Elene, Phoenix and Physiologus (New Haven, 1919), p. lviii. 2 See idem. For a more complete discussion, F. Lauchert...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1940) 1 (4): 551–552.
Published: 01 December 1940
... June he alters his tune; In July away he’ll fly; In August go he must.2 A. Thorburn, speaking of the bird’s song, says: “The males, trav- elling in advance of the females, soon announce their presence by the well-known call which, continuing through the month of May...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1961) 22 (2): 181–191.
Published: 01 June 1961
... terms of a barren mountainous landscape, and at the same time it is unfavorably contrasted with the happier existence of the plants, ani- mals, and birds. Each term pertaining to the existential situation of 2Rainer Maria Rilke, Samtliche Werke, 11, Gedichte, 2. Teil (n.p., Insel Verlag...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1998) 59 (2): 171–193.
Published: 01 June 1998
... the sun, and birds of so many kinds so different from our own that it is a marvel 1 Columbus, Journal oftheFzrst Voyage, ed. and trans. B. W. Ife (Warminster: his and Phillips, iggo), 31, 29, 51. I am grateful to Marshall Brown, Hunt Hawkins, Gail Paster, Annabel Patterson, Sara van...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 267–279.
Published: 01 September 1943
... Persia : King Kesra (i.e., Kosros Anushirvin) was in his bower when a serpent approached the nest of a pigeon in one of the crevices of the wall, with the intention of swallowing the young birds. The king promptly killed the snake with an arrow, saying: “This is how we treat the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1953) 14 (1): 43–59.
Published: 01 March 1953
... few examples, some of which are already familiar to Whitman students. The first poem we shall consider is the short piece “To the Man- of-War-Bird,” in the “Sea-Drift” section of IAeaves of Grass. In the first number of the magazine Progress, published in Philadelphia on November 16...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2014) 75 (1): 57–75.
Published: 01 March 2014
... Messianism: Disinterestedness in Arnold .” Victorian Studies 50 , no. 4 : 615 – 39 . Ramazani Jahan . 1994 . Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . Rothenberg David . 2005 . Why Birds Sing: A Journey through the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1969) 30 (4): 621.
Published: 01 December 1969
... be a person, the family, the Church, society, or the State which, in the name of some “higher authority,” tries to bind man with chains of moral conformity. (p. 4) In short, a most serviceable bird. The knack that Prometheus shows, in Gide’s irreverent rewriting, for roasting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1946) 7 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 March 1946
... fewer than fifty lines, the following inconsistencies showed up : Bird The mock-bird chirping on the thorn Sarah 8 Mock The mock-bird chirping on the thorn Sarah 3 ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1956) 17 (4): 310–317.
Published: 01 December 1956
... winde kalt und klarl Each stanza is devoted to a separate group of birds, and these groups are distinguished in a number of ways. The difference in color is perhaps the most striking. Stanza one is devoted to shades of white: though martins and swallows are in fact blue-black and white...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1943) 4 (2): 233–235.
Published: 01 June 1943
..., the work has never ap- peared in English translation. Sakellarid&s, Lauvri&re, Marc Cito- leux, Baldensperger, SCchC and others have given it some attention in their respective works on its author, but no thorough study has been made. Dr. Bird’s book, therefore, comes as a welcome addition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1946) 7 (1): 123–125.
Published: 01 March 1946
... the con- cordance brought to light so many errors that the authority of the whole work was seriously damaged. In cross-checking fewer than fifty lines, the following inconsistencies showed up : Bird The mock-bird chirping on the thorn Sarah 8 Mock...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 375–376.
Published: 01 December 1960
... expressed the same thought less elegantly by calling Defoe an “old jail-bird.” As for his principal characters, the two who sought wealth as an end-not as a means to integrity and independence-were a pirate and a kept mistress. Crusoe chartered a ship to provision the island he had given away...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1992) 53 (2): 227–245.
Published: 01 June 1992
..., my too sudden reflection. -Who knows if it wasn’t the same bird that rang through us both, yesterday, each alone, in the evening?) Extraordinarily syncretic and curiously fragmented, the poem includes echoes of and allusions to several dead poets...