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behn

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 189–203.
Published: 01 June 1946
...Rowland M. Hill Copyright © 1946 by Duke University Press 1946 APHRA BEHN’S USE OF SETTING SETTINGUNKNOWN SETTINGKNOWN TO BEHN TO BEHN London Rural England Foreign 1683 Adventure of Black Lady...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (3): 341–367.
Published: 01 September 2011
... background and foreground and between text and New World context, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko: A Royal Slave exploits these tensions between the economic and political domains to reveal the market not only as an ethical framework for political freedom but also as a tyrant ruling over those it dispossesses. Taken...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 401–405.
Published: 01 September 1942
...Wylie Sypher Copyright © 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 A NOTE ON THE REALISM OF MRS. BEHN’S OROONOKO By WYLIESYPHER The “realism” of Mrs. Behn’s Oroonoko is a vexed question.’ Yet no matter what Mrs. Behn owes to French...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 286–291.
Published: 01 September 1951
... exalted, in Defoe’s own time through Mrs. Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko. Defoe was acquainted with the author,1° whose popular and reputedly true story had gone through several printings, both separately and with her collected works. The sixth edition of the latter appeared just a year prior...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 441–443.
Published: 01 December 1986
... and Anne Killigrew, subject of a famous Dryden ode; group Aphra Behn, author of the novel Oronooko, with Thomas Southerne, who wrote a play on the same subject; consider Eliza Haywood, writer of The Fenzale Spectator, along with Addison and Steele, her male predecessors and counterparts. Ideally...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 436–441.
Published: 01 December 1986
... for a book! In order to illuminate women’s contribu- tions to Restoration and eighteenth-century English literature, provide a series of essays pairing male and female writers. Link John Dryden and Anne Killigrew, subject of a famous Dryden ode; group Aphra Behn, author of the novel Oronooko...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 448–454.
Published: 01 December 1947
... Emperor, whereas All for Love, The Spanish Fryur, and Azweng-Zebe appeared without mention of the author. Shadwell generally rated the adjective “ingenious,” a term which he shares with Mrs. Behn, Wycherley, Otway, and I3eauniont and Fletcher. Quite often a play was designated as “Written...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 683–686.
Published: 01 December 2000
... MLQ ❙ December 2000 suppressing the absorptive pleasures of reading: Aphra Behn’s Love-letters be- tween a Nobleman and His Sister (1684–87), Delarivier Manley’s New Atalantis (1709), and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess (1719–20) serve as examples...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 686–689.
Published: 01 December 2000
... suppressing the absorptive pleasures of reading: Aphra Behn’s Love-letters be- tween a Nobleman and His Sister (1684–87), Delarivier Manley’s New Atalantis (1709), and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess (1719–20) serve as examples of the shameless pleasures of the novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 689–692.
Published: 01 December 2000
... suppressing the absorptive pleasures of reading: Aphra Behn’s Love-letters be- tween a Nobleman and His Sister (1684–87), Delarivier Manley’s New Atalantis (1709), and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess (1719–20) serve as examples of the shameless pleasures of the novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 692–696.
Published: 01 December 2000
... suppressing the absorptive pleasures of reading: Aphra Behn’s Love-letters be- tween a Nobleman and His Sister (1684–87), Delarivier Manley’s New Atalantis (1709), and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess (1719–20) serve as examples of the shameless pleasures of the novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (3): 323–347.
Published: 01 September 2003
...- dence, but they are, in fact, radically distinct categories; we miss some- thing crucial about eighteenth-century narrative if we let them bleed into one another. I tend to think here of the odd, inconclusive anti- romances by earlier women writers—Aphra Behn, Jane Barker, Eliza Haywood—as so many...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 415–427.
Published: 01 December 1994
...- teenth century. The rare exceptions-in fiction by Behn and Hay- wood-function more to highlight the transgressive love between brothers and sisters than to establish the indissolubility of blood kin ties. Aphra Behn’s Dumb Virgzn; or; The Force of Imagznation ( 1700), for example, hinges...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (3): 377–380.
Published: 01 September 2023
... of the book revolve around not collectivity but sovereignty. Chapter 3 examines revisionist approaches to sovereignty after the 1640s, a period that “retool[ed] sovereign exceptionalism as a doctrine of individual feeling and personal obligation” (89). An excellent, if at times dense, discussion of Aphra Behn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (4): 518–521.
Published: 01 December 2015
..., discretionary power . . . [over] the enslaved” (351). This part of her argument will no doubt remain controversial, not least because Locke seems (in many passages quoted here and throughout) strictly to limit the rights of conquest to just wars, which few British subjects—including the Royalist Aphra Behn—saw...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (4): 445–472.
Published: 01 December 2003
... is often said to have been born.6 Indeed, Catherine Gallagher has argued that such dematerialization was a necessary condition of the author’s emergence. “Since our modern notion of the author is itself a feature of print culture,” Gallagher writes, using Aphra Behn as her par- adigmatic case, “we must...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 453–456.
Published: 01 December 2001
... is from the amatory fiction of Behn, Manley, and Haywood to the overtly didactic novels of Richardson and Fielding. In his first full-length chapter Richetti traces the emergence of British amatory fic- tion out of Continental romance and French scandal fiction. We...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 456–460.
Published: 01 December 2001
... how these various narrative transformations are responses to social change and, to some extent, agents of that change or influences upon it” (15). The narrative transformation of greatest concern in the first hundred pages is from the amatory fiction of Behn, Manley...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 461–465.
Published: 01 December 2001
... how these various narrative transformations are responses to social change and, to some extent, agents of that change or influences upon it” (15). The narrative transformation of greatest concern in the first hundred pages is from the amatory fiction of Behn, Manley...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 465–468.
Published: 01 December 2001
... how these various narrative transformations are responses to social change and, to some extent, agents of that change or influences upon it” (15). The narrative transformation of greatest concern in the first hundred pages is from the amatory fiction of Behn, Manley...