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bard

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1992) 53 (4): 393–408.
Published: 01 December 1992
...Mark Booth Copyright © 1992 by Duke University Press 1992 WRITTEN AND WRITING BARDS IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LYRIC BJ MARK BOOTH The ode-writing English lyric poets of the mideighteenth century made considerable use of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1953) 14 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 March 1953
...John Bard McNulty Judson Stanley Lyon. New Haven: Yale Studies in English, Vol. 114, 1950. Pp. x + 152. $3.75. Copyright © 1953 by Duke University Press 1953 122 Reviews eating and yet having one’s cake. From what seem to be strained interpretations of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2014) 75 (1): 1–28.
Published: 01 March 2014
... reputation of Scotland’s national bard, a figure resolving a multiplicity of citizens into the image of unity, Burns’s poems nevertheless present complex, creaturely subjects that seemingly consist in more and less than themselves, in more and less than “one.” The poems thus make a narrow case for the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 445–449.
Published: 01 December 1950
... not write like Whitman. Yet Mr. Res- nick admits that O’Connor’s novel Harrington (already written and in proof when Whitman and the novelist first met in 1860) has un- usual words characteristic of the bard, even phrasings and cadences that are similar. Moreover, O’Connor’s short story...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1961) 22 (4): 405.
Published: 01 December 1961
...- century American democratic bard. Walter Whitman and the newly created Walt Whitman were not the same, but the relationships were not wholly fiction, nor fraudulent, nor a posturing. The man endeavored to make hiinself over to fit the part. Among many other things, he took the vow of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1996) 57 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 1996
... Fall, the Miltonic bard had diplomatically excluded from paradise the reader’s determining knowledge of fallen history, thus preserving our first parents’ freedom and dignity” (42). But if Milton did intend to “block off the fallen reader’s experience “particularly the Christian experience of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1998) 59 (3): 385–387.
Published: 01 September 1998
... + 294 pp. $45.00 cloth, $18.95 paper. What’s Shakespeare for? Suddenly, the Bard’s own thoughts and meanings seem considerably less interesting than those he regularly provokes in oth- ers. As clamorous accounts of the content and concerns of his plays yield ground to the more disturbing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 298–302.
Published: 01 September 1948
... Experience, “The Voice of the Ancient Bard,” “A Little Girl Lost,” “The Chimney Sweeper,” “A Poison Tree,” and “To Tirzah.” Of these, “A Little Girl Lost which tells of the youthful pair playing on the grass, carries the following motto: Children of a future age...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
... early Byronic experiments in traditional satiric modes and of English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, Beaty provides an economical yet enlightening overview of the literary climate in which Byron’s early satiric impulses were fostered. He reminds us, for instance, that Byron had recourse to a “living...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 443–446.
Published: 01 December 1986
... early Byronic experiments in traditional satiric modes and of English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, Beaty provides an economical yet enlightening overview of the literary climate in which Byron’s early satiric impulses were fostered. He reminds us, for instance, that Byron had recourse to a “living...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1940) 1 (3): 423–427.
Published: 01 September 1940
... Shakespeare," for example, begins: "Full many bards have down the ages sung" ;8 and "On the Sonnet" begins: "Of late the sonnet sweet. 9 One of the two other short pieces is an "Ode" in the manner of "Bards of Passion and of Mirth." It is a long jingle beginning: Muses Nine and Graces...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1951) 12 (4): 506–508.
Published: 01 December 1951
... Gazette Diplomatique could be viewed as evidence on the “proved” side, for now we know that EstauniC had studied Bards’s use and even ventured to analyze why Un Homme Libre turned out to be “disgusting and slightly ridiculous.” But just because EstauniC considered Bar& incompe- tent in his use...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1952) 13 (4): 353–355.
Published: 01 December 1952
... representations, I wrate an Essay to present to each purchaser of the print, and therein endeavoured to justify my firm conviction that the Stratford Effigy was the most authentic and genuine Portrait of the Bard.8 The engraved representation of the Bust was issued with the Remarks on April 23, 1816...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2002) 63 (4): 411–440.
Published: 01 December 2002
... made with English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Anonymous publication, Byron reasoned, would allow the poem to earn the acclaim it deserved before it was yoked to its author’s name (Marchand, Biography, 288). The fact is that Byron had been obsessed with literary fame from the moment that he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1984) 45 (4): 415–416.
Published: 01 December 1984
... Erickson’s notion of Browning’s God, to whom it is said the poet’s work is so often addressed. Further, one is perplexed by Erickson’s depiction of the young Browning as one who aspired to be prophet and bard (see especially page 137) when all his early work is marked by a frank disavowal of both...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 368–369.
Published: 01 September 1943
... humorous pieces, most welcome are the parody of Peter Bell, and the one beginning: He lived amidst th’untrodden ways To Rydal Lake that lead:- A bard whom there were none to praise, And very few to read. B. K...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1966) 27 (1): 95–96.
Published: 01 March 1966
... sources, followed up with a sustained bard’s-eye view of their dramatic distribution, combination, and revision, or with a review of previous interpretations or “problems” in which the author sets up two contradictory views of the play and then casts his own vote for the “commonsense” position...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1967) 28 (4): 491–492.
Published: 01 December 1967
... Aminta, and the lyric poetry. Speiiser and Milton were naturally attracted to the epic, while the poetry found echoes among such lesser bards as John Reynolds, Samuel Daniel, William Hrowne, and William Drummond. This rapid summary is useful and parallels in a more modest way the efforts of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1944) 5 (1): 79–88.
Published: 01 March 1944
... country proverbs were puerile, and that his descriptive passages violated decorum. Pope burlesqued Philips’ “elegant dia- lect” in a pastoral dialogue, purporting to be the work of an “old west-country bard.” I quote a brief passage : Cicily. Rager go vetch tha kee, or else tha...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1948) 9 (4): 429–439.
Published: 01 December 1948
... confounded book of yours.”l Although Byron always thought of these poems as an out- standing breach of the laws of propriety in literature, his admiration for them was sincere and lasting. Poor LITTLE! sweet, melodious bard ! Of late esteem’d it monstrous hard...