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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 262–264.
Published: 01 September 1960
...Helen A. Kaufman C. L. Barber. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1959. Pp. x + 266. $5.00. Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 262 Reviczws The section of the introduction on the date and dialect of the lyrics (pp. 36-42) leaves...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 401–402.
Published: 01 December 1962
...Nathan Comfort Starr R. W. Barber With a foreword by David Jones London: Barrie and Rockliff, 1961. Pp. xiii + 218. 30 s . Copyright © 1962 by Duke University Press 1962 J. Leeds Barroll 401 [ 19611, 195) are not inappropriate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 113–118.
Published: 01 June 1972
... hirn- self) he does not know Greek very well (p. 36). On the other hand, W. H. Barber argues against Wade’s conclusions in favor of a decisive reworking of the conte in the early 1750s just be- Ira 0. Watle, Voltuzre’s “Microrntgus” (Princeton, 1950), p. 14 and it. 10, p. 15...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 400–401.
Published: 01 December 1962
..., is the great English heroic legend. It has an apparently limitless vitality and protean variety. R. W. Barber in brief compass gives an account which would acquaint the general reader with the most important English Arthurian works from the shadowy emergence of Arthur as the Celtic dzrx bellorurn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 264–265.
Published: 01 September 1960
... of the prince to Falstaff. “The ititer- reg1:um of a Lord oi Misrule,” says Barber, may well develop “intc the anarchic rule of a favorite dominating a dissolute king.” Hal, of course, while thor- oughly cnjoyiiig his own folly and Falstaff’s companionship, senses the tedious- ncss of a life made...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 402–403.
Published: 01 December 1962
... we know that they were reprinted a number of times in the sixteenth. So too the author’s unqualified statement (p. 95) that Gawain was the real owner of Excalibur will perplex readers of the legend. Again, Barber states that Hughes’s Mis- forturzes of Arthur (1587) is the only Arthurian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 261–262.
Published: 01 September 1960
... University Press, 1959. Pp. x + 266. $5.00. Primarily festive rather than romantic or satiric, Shakespeare’s early come- dies from Low’s Labour’s Lost through Twelfth Xight are, according to C. L. Barber, closely related to the “saturnalian” traditions of the popular theater and popular...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 285–301.
Published: 01 June 1965
... the Barber” the process literally means a momentary defeat of death. Most of the poem summarizes death in a way that makes it inhuman and macabre. Death is like a barber, a barber tells Williams, “cutting my / life with / sleep to trim / my hair”; it’s “just / a moment”; we “die / every night...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 283–291.
Published: 01 September 1961
... and empty art are the same thing and that aesthetic purism was a brilliant maneuver of the bourgeois of the last century who preferred to see themselves denounced as philistines rather than as exploiters.”13 Brecht’s rich barber Shu Fu might smash a poor water seller’s hand while at the same...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (3): 295–319.
Published: 01 September 1999
... of the emotion of romance in strictly economic terms.28 That the letter disrupts the narrative can be seen when the two versions of Cardenio’s story-as he tells it first to Quijote and the goatherd and later to the barber and the priest-are compared with each other. In the first version...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (4): 377–391.
Published: 01 December 1992
... doun,” saying, “Biwreye me nat, thou water, with thy soun . . . to thee I telle it and namo; / Myn housbonde hath longe asses erys two!” (3.9’70-76). As if to emphasize the evocative link between woman and water, Chaucer not only has Alison turn Ovid’s male barber into Midas’s uncontainable...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (1): 51–74.
Published: 01 March 2019
... : 18; see also Barber 1979 : 62; Doran 1954 : 148–85; Nelson 1985 : 202; Salingar 1974 : 76–128). However, there are important differences between the Roman lost-child plots and Shakespeare’s romances. Perhaps most significantly, the Roman plays tend to treat their material farcically...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 263–271.
Published: 01 September 1962
... the hairdresser. Leaving the eighteenth-century world of Bourbon France, Crispin, the “Comedian as the Letter C,” valet with his “barber’s eye,” set sail from Bordeaux for the New World. In Europe the violence of nature had been suppressed and forgotten amid gardens and palaces. The style of Louis XV...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 506–522.
Published: 01 December 1965
.... Barber, Shakespeare’s Festive Comedy (Princeton, 1959), p. 137. 512 A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex. We cannot fight for love, as men may do. We should be woo’d and were not made to woo...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 110–111.
Published: 01 March 1963
..., it is valuable to have in a more readable form than C. L. Barber’s recent study, the range of meanings given to “honor,” especially if we are inclined, with Falstaff, to dismiss the word as “a mere scutcheon.” Less valuable is his effort to turn what is an interesting study of ideas into sociology...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 111–112.
Published: 01 March 1963
... in the Renaissance. It includes a convincing argument against those who consider Renaissance ethics to be either humanistic or Christian, and so ignore the potential clash between the two systems. Further, it is valuable to have in a more readable form than C. L. Barber’s recent study, the range...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (1): 88–89.
Published: 01 March 1960
... of character: this was the formula of his modernity. He saw history intuitively and he saw it whole. In the Saga of the Folkungs he may have Erik Magnusson eject from a barber shop a Knut Porse who, historically, died nine years before he, Erik, was born, but the dramatic profit exceeds any...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 93–95.
Published: 01 March 1966
... influences upon the comedies- 94 REVIEWS Janet Spens, C. L. Barber, Northrop Frye-he makes a gift of Occam’s razor, allowing the complicity of “primitive modes of thought” in Shake- spearean creation but dismissing “primitive acts of ritual...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (1): 55–62.
Published: 01 March 1961
... disease attains its highest value. Mann’s Goethe is having his hair dressed by his barber; pur- suing his daydreaming, Goethe’s eyes light upon his own hand, broad and firm, shaped by generations of blacksmiths and butchers-a hand which does not fit at all with the soft and silky hair of his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 309–328.
Published: 01 September 2012
... in a formalized sense. For writers such as Francis Obeng, Amos Tutu- ola, Mofolo, and Plaatje, part of what Karin Barber terms the “obscure literati” that pioneered African writing, the only available models of literary form were the King James Bible, William...