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bacchus

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (2): 150–159.
Published: 01 June 1962
...Bernard J. Paris Copyright © 1962 by Duke University Press 1962 EMERSON’S “B ACCH U S ” By BERNARDJ. PARIS Emerson’s “Bacchus” is usually spoken of with a mixture of respect and reservation; although the poem seems full of spontaneity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 205–208.
Published: 01 June 1943
... certainly have ap- prised Shelley of the traditional connection between ivy and Bacchus. The plant is sacred to Bacchus because it was once partly respon- sible for saving his life. “Hedera est grattissima Baccho,” says Ovid (Fasti, 111, 767-770), adding that Bacchus’ jealous stepmother Hera...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 123–131.
Published: 01 June 1977
... who that leader is allegorically meant to be but also how what he represents is meant to be viewed. Spenser’s depiction of Sylvanus also includes a strand of ivy twisted around his waist. This ivy, within the classical tradition, associates Syl- vanus with Bacchus, for whom ivy is an emblem...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (1): 87–89.
Published: 01 March 1954
... discussion, to a number of other poems in which Ronsard exalts the god of wine : “Chant de folie h Bacchus,” “Dithyrambes h la pompe du bouc de Jodelle,” “Hinne de Bacus.” M. Desguine’s introduction and commentary, studied in conjunction with the text of Ronsard, constitute a fluent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (4): 424–439.
Published: 01 December 1970
..., Wherein was Proteus carvd, and o’rehead, A livelie vine of greene sea agget spread; Where by one hand, light headed Bacchus hoong, And with the other, wine from grapes out wroong. Of Christall shining faire, the pavement was, The towne...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (1): 60–81.
Published: 01 March 1953
... of Leaves of Grass followed the proto-pattern in Book X of the Divine Pyunander, he could carry out the instructions given there and identify himself with anything and everything. He could be any god or incarnation of a god, such as Christ, Hermes, Hercules, Kneph, Osiris, Bacchus, Lucifer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 1954
..., and on the shelves of every student of the French Renaissance. It ought, indeed, to appeal to an even vaster audience, to every lover of Bacchus and the vine. For one may say of this book, in an Eastern phrase, what the Psalmist said of the fruit that Bacchus brought with him from the East-it maketh...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 354–364.
Published: 01 December 1963
....” The occupants, after prolonged feasting and drinking, fall to love-making. Malecasta, as the result of her indulgence, makes advances to Brito- mart, whom she believes to be a man (III.i.31-67). In a later episode, Paridell attempts to seduce Britomart by getting her to drink of Bacchus’ cup (III.ix...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (3): 545–551.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- ity to experience them as such. Lukacher touches on this aspect of suffering when he discusses Titian’s Bacchus and Ariadne (1523), handsomely reproduced on the cover of Time- Fetishes. A detail depicts Bacchus leaping rather awkwardly from his chariot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (3): 551–554.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- ity to experience them as such. Lukacher touches on this aspect of suffering when he discusses Titian’s Bacchus and Ariadne (1523), handsomely reproduced on the cover of Time- Fetishes. A detail depicts Bacchus leaping rather awkwardly from his chariot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (3): 554–559.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- ity to experience them as such. Lukacher touches on this aspect of suffering when he discusses Titian’s Bacchus and Ariadne (1523), handsomely reproduced on the cover of Time- Fetishes. A detail depicts Bacchus leaping rather awkwardly from his chariot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (3): 559–562.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- ity to experience them as such. Lukacher touches on this aspect of suffering when he discusses Titian’s Bacchus and Ariadne (1523), handsomely reproduced on the cover of Time- Fetishes. A detail depicts Bacchus leaping rather awkwardly from his chariot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (2): 151–167.
Published: 01 June 1976
... the mad- man’s relation to the god Dionysus: “Bacchus, Bacchus, auch dich fing einer ein / Und band dich fest, doch nicht fur lange!” (GLD, p. 316). Given Hofmannsthal’s interest in Euripides’ Bacchue, it is obvious that the reference in these lines is to Bacchus’s temporary imprisonment...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 99–114.
Published: 01 June 1979
...- tion in Salmacis’ eyes and rejects her offer of love, saying, “How should I love thee, when I doe espie / A farre more beauteous Nymph hid in thy eye?” (691-92). Salmacis has already been told by Bacchus that her “translucent eye” is “more transparent then the clearest brooke” (436-37...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 392–404.
Published: 01 December 1952
... harvest hymn to Bacchus (1554), where he harps on the legend that Bacchus after the death of his mother Semele was nour- ished in the thigh of his father Jupiter. But jealous Juno poked fun at the cuisse-ne‘, as Ronsard calls Bacchus well imitating Marullus’ femorigenu, and is furious “D’avoir...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 387–388.
Published: 01 December 1948
... and 30. 388 Marot and Marlowe in at least six lines of Hero’s priesthood. The word nun as “A priestess or votaress of some pagan deity” has four NED citations earlier than 1600, two of them with reference to nuns of Bacchus! Marlowe uses the phrase Venus Nun again...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 504–505.
Published: 01 December 1946
..., Bacchus Festival (1660), The Cheaters Cheated (1659), and Eclogue (1659) ; Williarn, Philips, Alcamenes und Menulippa (1668) ; Rochester, Sodom (“Antwerp, 1684) ; Thomas Snellinu, Pharamus (Oxford, 1650) ; Matthew Taubman, London’s Art-niversary Festival .( 1688) ; and the following anonymous...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 503–504.
Published: 01 December 1946
... (16 ; Edmund Gayton, Charity Triumphant (1655) ; Thomas Jordan, Bacchus Festival (1660), The Cheaters Cheated (1659), and Eclogue (1659) ; Williarn, Philips, Alcamenes und Menulippa (1668) ; Rochester, Sodom (“Antwerp, 1684) ; Thomas Snellinu, Pharamus (Oxford, 1650) ; Matthew Taubman...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (1): 35–43.
Published: 01 March 1957
..., tersely suggested by Stanzas IV and V, we pass from what is light and warm into the cold darkness of inescapable death and defeat. But ah the Sickle ! Golden Eares are Cropt ; Ceres and Bacchus bid good night ; Sharpe frosty fingers all your FIowr’s have topt...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 217–218.
Published: 01 June 1953
... of parody of a religious order and the joys of Bacchus. W. P. Fischer traces the Lear legend in “King Lear at Tuebingen: Johannes Nauclerus and Geoffrey of Monmouth” (pp. 208-27). Stith Thompson treats in the folklorist manner “Story-Writers and Story-Tellers’’ (pp. 228-34). S. A. Small analyzes...