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assimilation

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (3): 303–308.
Published: 01 September 2001
...Michael Galchinsky The Temple of Culture: Assimilation and Anti-Semitism in Literary Anglo-America By Jonathan Freedman. Oxford: Oxford University Press,2000. vi + 264 2001 University of Washington. © 2001 University of Washington 2001 MLQ 62.3-05 Reviews 7/12/01 1:22 PM Page 285...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (3): 411–437.
Published: 01 September 2014
... to multiple historical uses. Ngũgĩ makes use of Conrad not by engaging with his historical context but by dehistoricizing his literary forms and themes for anti- and postcolonial purposes. Conrad’s novels are usually assimilated to a narrative of modernist experimentation in which innovative literary form...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (2): 201–235.
Published: 01 June 2012
.... Mad Men belongs to a long line of naturalist narratives in which the outsider within (often a Jew or probable Jew) assimilates the myriad impacts of capitalist globalization and thus exemplifies the periodic resurgence of historical realism, which Georg Lukács predicted in The Historical Novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (3): 391–412.
Published: 01 September 2013
... sensibility (as apprehended in Woolf’s 1925 Common Reader essay, “The Russian Point of View”), but this congruence was intensified during extensive final revisions, begun in typescript just after Woolf had viewed a production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters in late October 1925. Woolf’s purposeful assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 13–27.
Published: 01 March 2008
... literary and theoretical writings. By investigating the assimilation of translations into the Chinese literary canon, this essay focuses on a hybridized political and cultural discourse that marks a radical shift in aesthetic and cultural sensibilities in modern Chinese literature. The call for reshaping...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1941
... change is due to three main forces : 1, assimilation ; 2, reaction against assimilation ; 3, the need for forcefulness. The interplay of these three forces is generalized in the state- ment (p. 3) : “Linguistic change is caused by assimilation and the reaction against assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (3): 522–524.
Published: 01 September 1941
... to some form of assimilation or dissimila- tion, and in the proposal that the interplay of those two processes is the basic and necessary cause of all linguistic change. In the development of his speech, man has acted (subconscious- ly, and only to a slight degree consciously...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 344–345.
Published: 01 June 1941
... now the new theory of the linguistic change “proposed here for the first time.” First come a number of generalizations upon primitive lan- guages of all kinds. The author states that linguistic change is due to three main forces : 1, assimilation ; 2, reaction against assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (4): 359–365.
Published: 01 December 1954
... gerissen, erscheint zugleich aIs die Fratze eines Volkes, das der Anpassung verfallen seine Herkunft, seinen Sinn und sein Ziel vergessen und verraten hat. . . .”3 Mr. Politzer echoes here the misgivings of Na- tional- Jewish and Zionist circles against the “evils” of the assimilation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (1): 141–153.
Published: 01 March 1993
..., empathize, assimilate. 3 See the literature review by Imeldo Alvarez Garcia, prologue to Cecilia Vakfis, by Cirilo Villaverde, 2 vols. (Havana: Editorial Letras Cubanas, 198 I ) , I :5-46; also Roberto Friol, “La novela cubana del siglo diecinueve,” Unih, December, 1968: 178. 4 Steiner...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 147–150.
Published: 01 March 1941
...,” the scope and breadth of the experience which their poetry assimilates. This is not to me suc- cessful because it depends on a theory of the ultimate identity of symbolist and metaphysical poetry, which in turn depends on the adducing of similarities in qualities or instruments (irony...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
..., p. 285). Among the Wellesley Lutherans [ m] appears in fimf “five” (generally finf in KG) . XXI. KG [n] is derived from: (1) MHG n: no:dal “needle”, g1e:na “smaller”, etc. (2) MHG nd or nt in intervocalic position by assimilation: fina “to find”, kina “children”, rina “heifers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (4): 395–403.
Published: 01 December 1982
... models, thoroughly assimilated so they speak to the condi- tion of the particular Jacobean contemporaries he addresses. Both authors, moreover, see Jonson as a more complex writer than he is usually judged to be, but their differing perspectives lead them to define Jonson’s complexity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (1): 71–74.
Published: 01 March 2001
... PM Page 79 Hess ❙ Review 79 logues’ visions of Jewish assimilation into German culture. Rather than pro- ceed chronologically, Robertson explores five thematic subfields, devoting a chapter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (1): 74–78.
Published: 01 March 2001
... PM Page 79 Hess ❙ Review 79 logues’ visions of Jewish assimilation into German culture. Rather than pro- ceed chronologically, Robertson explores five thematic subfields, devoting a chapter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (1): 78–80.
Published: 01 March 2001
... PM Page 79 Hess ❙ Review 79 logues’ visions of Jewish assimilation into German culture. Rather than pro- ceed chronologically, Robertson explores five thematic subfields, devoting a chapter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (1): 81–82.
Published: 01 March 2001
... PM Page 79 Hess ❙ Review 79 logues’ visions of Jewish assimilation into German culture. Rather than pro- ceed chronologically, Robertson explores five thematic subfields, devoting a chapter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
.... acc. sg. forms, fogel, where MHG o stood in an open syllable. 9 PaG [m] also results from assimilation of MHG n to a following labial in MHG geben .wir and other such forms; hence PaG [mi:r] “we”. Carroll E. Rcrd 273 2. UNSTRESSED VOWELS...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (3): 285–287.
Published: 01 September 1987
....” The somber pathos of Pope’s all clearly includes the comprehensive vision of Paradise Lost, a poem that he assimilated with such intelligence and imagination that it seems reasonable to mark the end of the Age of Milton with the death of Pope. (p. 1) Even if Pope is more...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 453–467.
Published: 01 December 1944
..., and, blessed with the capacity of genius for assimilation, he learned valuable lessons in the ways of writing and in the art of reading society. I Dickens himself supplies us freely with the first link in our chain of argument: the proof of his reading...