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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 461–492.
Published: 01 December 2011
...Geoffrey Turnovsky Modesty and other “antiauthorial” conventions (anonymity, self-effacing prefaces, refusal to profit) tend to be viewed as retrograde concessions to the outdated norms of an antiquated cultural field, which a more modern, assertive, and critical authorial figure will learn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 329–349.
Published: 01 September 2012
... realism offers a putative solution to the problem of casteist assertion in the cultural sphere. Toral Jatin Gajarawala is assistant professor of English and comparative literature at New York University. Her book, tentatively titled Untouchable Fictions: Literary Realism and the Crisis of Caste...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (1): 77–101.
Published: 01 March 2014
... implicit understanding of mental life to assert itself more clearly. Simon Kemp is tutorial fellow in French at Somerville College, Oxford. He is author of Defective Inspectors: Crime Fiction Pastiche in Late-Twentieth-Century French Fiction (2006) and French Fiction into the Twenty-First...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (2): 201–224.
Published: 01 June 2021
... practices, and it is those practices that emerge over time. The article then recasts the interest in the early novel’s fictionality shown by Catherine Gallagher and others as a problem of practices rather than of concepts. It tracks trends in subject matter and assertions of literal truth through...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... such freedom. To assert some degree of social and political freedom depends on attaining freedom from thoughts and feelings that block free action. Hamlet probes the early modern semantic range of free and its cognates, which could denote sociopolitical status, on the one hand, and aspects of moral character...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 292–309.
Published: 01 September 1951
... and then by a series of actions with a view to be freed from it. As Captain Booth asserts that “every man acted entirely from that passion which was uppermost,” Franklin asserts that uneasiness, the sole source of all our desires and passions, is “the first Spring and Cause of all Actions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 156–171.
Published: 01 June 1972
... spiritual achievements. The successful resolution of the conflicts between the poet and Irish society in “Prayer” prepares one for arid intensifies the triumph of the volume’s concluding poem, “To Be Carved on a Stone at Thoor Bally- lee” (p. 406). This brief poem begins with an assertion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (1): 99–104.
Published: 01 March 1981
... and inconclusive.” Mellor’s concern is to demonstrate the validity of her assertion and to relate the phe- nomenon she is investigating to a “way of thinking” she terms Romantic irony. This Romantic irony, she believes, “was as significant and important a way of thinking about the nature of the universe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
... of physical self-assertion but lived on with (and within) his works. Leaves of Gass was a “Song of Myself’ in the fullest I1 London, 1895, p. 423. IY Self-Porlruit in u Convex Mirror: Poems John Ash4 (New York: Viking Press, 1975), p. 68. TIM ARMSTRONG...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
... of physical self-assertion but lived on with (and within) his works. Leaves of Gass was a “Song of Myself’ in the fullest I1 London, 1895, p. 423. IY Self-Porlruit in u Convex Mirror: Poems John Ash4 (New York: Viking Press, 1975), p. 68. TIM ARMSTRONG...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (2): 139–158.
Published: 01 June 1967
... that it allows of no other. Every major actor is compelled-not necessarily by pride and pugnacity but by the language available to him-to step onto the stage, assume the proper posture, and rehearse his piece. The burden of the piece need not always be self-assertion or defiance, though most often...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (1): 111–120.
Published: 01 March 1993
... Carolyn Porter, that New Historicists “ask themselves whether and when [their] kind of analysis becomes complicit in the cultural operations of power it ostensibly wants to analyze” or of more bluntly asserting, as does Donald Pease, that New Historicism is a sort of “linguistic colonialism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (4): 376–389.
Published: 01 December 1979
... concern for communicating his message to the reader, but he knew and pointed out repeatedly (notably in “Le Komancier et ses person- nages”) that the genius of his age asserted itself in the novel because novelists had learned to use a complex, new psychology, not available to Balzac, and to pay...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 252–260.
Published: 01 June 1970
...: that it poem must earn its way. Or to put it differently, sincerity in poetry is a quality that must be earned by the action of the verse itself. The point is important, for it is perhaps too easy in reading religious verse to take the poet’s doctrinal and moral assertions as simple beliefs...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 406–416.
Published: 01 December 1973
... Genius shine, Nor with less Praise the Conversation guide, Than in the publick Councils you decide: Or when the Dean, long privileg’d to rail, Asserts his Friend with more impetuous Zeal. . . . (1-4; 9-16...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 212–214.
Published: 01 June 1984
...). The casual tone of this thematic assertion recurs appropriately in the section on Forster (“One may as well begin with Miss Bartlett’s words to Lucy Honeychurch” [p. 295 but it contrasts sharply with the book’s implicit insistence on two great tradi- tions. The more overt is that of the realistic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (3): 310–314.
Published: 01 September 1977
... of Harold Bloom. The subject of Ferry’s study is what she calls (unhappily, to my ear, and with apologies) the “eternizing conceit”-that is, the familiar trope in which the poet asserts that he can grant immortality to his beloved by preserving the image of his love in verse...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 149–153.
Published: 01 June 1953
... of that noble poet, who certainly is intitled to the highest praise, for raising so beautiful a structure, even granting all the materials were borrowed; which is an assertion I will by no means take upon me absolutely to affirm. (p. 24) 6 Appciidix to the Memoirs of Thomas Hollis, Esq. (London...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 260–263.
Published: 01 June 1970
...Richard D. Altick Mary Rose Sullivan. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1969. xv + 226 pp. $7.50. Copyright © 1970 by Duke University Press 1970 260 KEVIEWS mate assertions or single statements, but rather in terms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (3): 404–408.
Published: 01 September 1993
...) talk about literature, what we mean by the word is quite pre- cisely the consequence of this modern history of literature’s practice and theory. One could perhaps say that this history is its meaning, but one must anyway say that it has no meaning outside this history. Cascardi asserts...