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arabella

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 441–443.
Published: 01 December 1986
..., and Anna Laetitia Bar- bauld” gives short shrift to Milton and Pope. Nominally comparing Samuel Johnson’s Rasselas with the tale’s continuation by Ellis Cornelia Knight, Messenger barely acknowledges the intricacy of Johnson’s achievement. More egregious still is “Arabella Fernior, 1714...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 379–382.
Published: 01 September 2021
... sympathies that Lennox and Graffigny explore around 1752” (94). Lennox’s Arabella, who has spent her life isolated in a castle by her tyrannical father, is an avid reader of French romances, such as those by Madeleine de Scudéry. Cheek speculates that besides Scudéry, Lennox had read Adrien Perdou Thomas de...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (3): 263–277.
Published: 01 September 1992
... It indicates that although there were many reasons for telling improbable lies- political, pedagogical, erotic, magical, religious, and heroic, among 1 Charlotte Lennox, The Female Quixote; or, The Adventures of Arabella, ed. Margaret Dalziel, intro. Margaret Anne Doody, World’s Classics (Oxford...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 189–203.
Published: 01 June 1946
... finds, except here and there in scattered scenes, in her plays.11 The story is that of the young Arabella, who, to escape marriage with a gentleman of fifty, wandered off from her home on a large estate in Somersetshire. At eight o’clock on the evening of her first day’s walk (she left home...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (1): 28–32.
Published: 01 March 1958
.... Her grief wore itself out. She forgave her brother-he was so much upset. But a day or two afterwards she was shocked. “Let’s make a sacrifice of Arabella,” he said. “Let’s burn her.” She was horrified, yet rather fascinated. She wanted to see what the boy would do. He made an altar...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (4): 499–526.
Published: 01 December 2021
... that Arabella, his wife, has purchased: “Roger’s considered view of the painting, looking at it from aesthetic, art-historical, interior-design, and psychological points of view, was that it had cost forty-seven thousand pounds, plus VAT” ( C , 26). Arabella has a more intricate understanding of money’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
... of Belinda and Ara- bella, however, is its lack of reflection on the immediately relevant literary tradition. Brooke’s Arabella draws heavily, in large conception and in de- tails of diction and thought, on Richardson’s Anna Howe from Clartssa. Her attitudes toward men, her intermittent iconoclasm...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 443–446.
Published: 01 December 1986
... of Belinda and Ara- bella, however, is its lack of reflection on the immediately relevant literary tradition. Brooke’s Arabella draws heavily, in large conception and in de- tails of diction and thought, on Richardson’s Anna Howe from Clartssa. Her attitudes toward men, her intermittent iconoclasm...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 99–103.
Published: 01 June 1956
..., and her companions, who were washing clothes in the river, and was well splashed for his pains. To be sure it was part of a freshly slaughtered pig, not water, that Arabella threw at Jude (Jude the Obscure, Anniversary Edition, 111, 41-42), but the two incidents are remarkably similar...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (2): 203–226.
Published: 01 June 2018
... that initially links Jude to Arabella; Arabella’s “supernumerary hair-coils,” the object of so much revulsion and regret (291); the “Christminster cakes” baked in the form of the university architecture (312). These things are so many anchors to past failures—especially where the trick of the novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (4): 338–349.
Published: 01 December 1984
...” or figurative construct of desire for power which functions, now that her husband Jonathan is dead, as a noble matriarchate with herself, the “Foundress of this Sect” (p. 16), at the center, her daughter Arabella and her niece Millamant on either side, and a surrounding cabal of professed manhaters...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 429–453.
Published: 01 December 1994
... or terms covers both the implacable romanticism of Arabella and the quotidian realism of her suitors.9 ShakespeareIZZustrated complicates this Manichaean dynamic by continually invoking “the novel” as a third term distinct from romance and realism alike. 7 Though Franklin dismisses...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (2): 153–169.
Published: 01 June 1991
...” of the lady. Yet the early Clarissa also has her share of high spirits. She can mimic Arabella’s posturing explanation of Lovelace’s diffidence as a suitor: “It was bashfulness, truly, in him. [Bashfulness, in Mr. Lovelace, my dear . . . he was really, to her thinking, a modest man. He would have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (2): 210–215.
Published: 01 June 1991
..., as power, as prophecy, as interpretation; plot as ideology; plot as a dynamic of desire” (p. 12). The chapter is a welcome reevaluation of an increasingly popular novel, if one perhaps overly generous to the destructive heroine Arabella. The analysis allows Spacks to begin her argument on solid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (4): 525–533.
Published: 01 December 1942
... to place Arabella Stuart on the throne, was found guilty and condemned to death. He was pardoned, however, and shortly thereafter turned up at the English college in Rome. With that, the record ceases. A Fig for Fortune is doubtless a more or less idealized objectifi- cation of Copley’s own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (2): 185–200.
Published: 01 June 1997
..., 197 I), 35. 11 Other committee members included Alice Abadam, Lena Ashwell, Elizabeth Banks, Nina Boyle, Mrs. Havelock Ellis, Mrs. E. Rentoul Esler, Elizabeth Gibson, Bessie Hatton, Margaret Hope, Annesley Kenealy, Dr. Arabella Kenealy, Mrs. Walde- mar Leverton, Edith Walderman Leveston...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 137–149.
Published: 01 June 1951
... of the compliment to himself that appeared under Wycherley’s signa- ture, and of offering obscene insults to Arabella Fermor by acknowl- edging her as the model for the heroine of The Rape of the Luck. In the concluding couplet Welsted was continuing the same thought. Proceeding with his attack...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 287–358.
Published: 01 June 2000
... for himself, though at the same time she could easily tell that noble blood flowed in his veins. 1831. James Hogg. “A Story of Good Queen Bess.” Blackwood’s Edin- burgh Magazine 29 (April): 579–92. The pretender Arabella Stuart, or someone like her, is persecuted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (2): 221–241.
Published: 01 June 2007
... of “the Other” and the Myth of Modernity, trans. Michael D. Barber (New York: Continuum, 1995), 139. 4 See Arabella Pauly, “Zur Geschichte des Begriffs neobarroco,” in Neobarroco: Zur Wesensbestimmung Lateinamerikas und seiner Literatur (Frankfurt am Main: Lang, 1993), 14. Elsewhere culteranismo...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (3): 183–198.
Published: 01 September 1957
.... In every respect he would make an admirable husband for Sara. There is no parental objection to the marriage, and his abduction of Sara was quite unnecessary. The discarded mistress Marwood would have been forgotten, the child Arabella could have been adopted, and the affair of the inheritance...