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alliterative verse

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (1): 3–19.
Published: 01 March 1987
... AND THE GHASTLY A MORAL AESTHETIC IN MIDDLE ENGLISH ALLITERATIVE VERSE* By SUSANNA6. FEIN In Middle English alliterative verse the ghoulish and the ghastly frequently appear as spectral visions to horrify the reader into a close...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 473–498.
Published: 01 December 2016
..., centered on alliterative verse, explore what is distinctive about the cultural work of early English poetics. Copyright © 2016 by University of Washington 2016 alliterative verse Geoffrey Chaucer meter poetics prosody Since the sixteenth century, the history of English poetics has had two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 100–125.
Published: 01 March 1992
... in alliterative verse that combine form and theme have been noted before.’ My purpose here is to draw attention to a previously unrecognized combined motif in two poems in the thirteen-line allit- erative stanza.*The intrinsic interest of the motif is enhanced by its evi- dent continuity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 281–313.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., in alliterating words that studded the accents of his verse. He studied Jakob Grimm’s philological dictionary and antique German poetry—listing epics in hemistichal, alliterative verse known as Stabreim (Wagner 1872 , 4:116–17). As such, his Ring seldom rhymes terminally. Wagner thought that end rhymes...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 138–139.
Published: 01 March 1941
... on this book; it is a careful, com- petent piece of work. KEMPMALONE Johns Hopkins University Beowdf : the Oldest English Epic. Translated into Alliterative Verse by CHARLESW. KENNEDY,Murray Professor of English Literature in Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (3): 427–428.
Published: 01 September 1940
... BOOKS RECEIVED ENGLISH Beowulf : The Oldest English Epic. [Translated into Alliterative Verse with a Critical Introduction by Charles W. Kennedy.] New York: Oxford University Press, 1940. Pp. lxv+121. $1.65. Boas, Frederick S. Christopher Marlowe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (3): 341–361.
Published: 01 September 1990
... is that the nobility was not itself an audience for alliterative verse. As Thorlac Turville-Petre has said of this poem, “The readership of The Siege of Jerusalem con- sisted of affluent land-owners and also the clergy”; but, he sug- gests, “the only nobleman to own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 137–138.
Published: 01 March 1941
.... Criswell is to be congratulated on this book; it is a careful, com- petent piece of work. KEMPMALONE Johns Hopkins University Beowdf : the Oldest English Epic. Translated into Alliterative Verse by CHARLESW. KENNEDY,Murray Professor...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (3): 423–427.
Published: 01 September 1940
... Epic. [Translated into Alliterative Verse with a Critical Introduction by Charles W. Kennedy.] New York: Oxford University Press, 1940. Pp. lxv+121. $1.65. Boas, Frederick S. Christopher Marlowe : A Biographical and Crit- ical Study. Oxford : At the Clarendon Press, 1940. Pp...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (1): 83–85.
Published: 01 March 1960
... strongly emphasized feature, that which marks it as traditional or old-fashioned, is that it is far closer to ritual than any later body of literature or than are the works of Chaucer. The alliterative verse in which many of the poems are written strengthens the dramatic and “traditional...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (1): 85–87.
Published: 01 March 1960
... emphasized feature, that which marks it as traditional or old-fashioned, is that it is far closer to ritual than any later body of literature or than are the works of Chaucer. The alliterative verse in which many of the poems are written strengthens the dramatic and “traditional” effects because...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (4): 339–343.
Published: 01 December 1959
.... The procedure of the first argument is explicit. It assumes that the manuscript reading of an Old English text is to be accepted unless “a passage makes absolutely no sense,” or unless, in poetry, “at least one Occurrence of the alliterative stave in each half-line” is absent. Arguing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 342–349.
Published: 01 December 1963
... for the use of number in medieval German literature and to suggest an adequate form of classification.6 In German literature proper, the first evidence for the use of number is the choice of three alliterating letters in the old form of alliterative verse. This, it is assumed, had its origin...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 389–393.
Published: 01 December 1948
... been written in more than five hundred years, but as evidence that even before the publica- tion of a complete Anglo-Saxon grammar or dictionary, or even a volume of verse,2 the Cambridge lecturer in Anglo-Saxon and one who was probably his student had a creditable grasp of Anglo-Saxon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 1–4.
Published: 01 March 1992
... hitherto unremarked aspects of the relationship between form and meaning in such verse and contrasts the ways in which they are employed at different points in the history of the alliterative revival. The evidence she adduces of such careful and complex design emphasizes the richness of this tradi...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 428–431.
Published: 01 December 1975
...” that remain unana- lyzed and undefined. This is a short cut if not a cop-out. What is perhaps worse than this trickery is Cable’s aligning of “D2” verses with “E” verses by ignoring the alliterative patterns: By the view presented here, patterns D2 and E should be regarded as a single...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (2): 115–128.
Published: 01 June 1985
... are composed of traditional alliterative collocations whose roots are in Old English poetry and prose, however, the central and controverted issue of the poem remains the evocative power of its language. Is this a song of “courtly clichk,” the cn’ du cam- of one spiritually dead, or the lament...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (2): 127–161.
Published: 01 June 1997
...). Though all may seem tonally nostalgic and generically retrograde in this verse, it is not. In addition to their backward-looking elegiacs, these texts evidence to modern readers a progressive-seeming prosody in their long, loose alliterative lines, in their increasing use of end rhyme...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 341–350.
Published: 01 September 1968
... and must concern students of literature. The striking thing is that we have-or know of-so few such incumbents. Gentle- men-courtiers who wrote verses were a different breed, not under the constraints of an Ariosto or a Tasso; and Spenser remained a miserable outsider. Most sixteenth-century...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 308–310.
Published: 01 September 1963
...- stration of the three-lift structure of the rhyming lines in the “wheels.” She then examines the long alliterative lines, which seem sometimes to have four lifts, sometimes five or even seven. All these lines, she argues, have four major stresses, two in each half-line. She holds...