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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (1): 32–36.
Published: 01 March 1961
...Walter R. Davis Copyright © 1961 by Duke University Press 1961 A NOTE ON ACCENT AND QUANTITY IN A BOOKE OF AYRES By WALTERR. DAVIS Each time Campion’s “Turne backe you wanton flyer” (A Booke of Ayres, Part I, vii) has been edited...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 129–132.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Brian Lennon Brian Lennon is associate professor of English and comparative literature at Pennsylvania State University and author of In Babel’s Shadow: Multilingual Literatures, Monolingual States (2010). Accented America: The Cultural Politics of Multilingual Modernism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
.... Thus, in early Old French, the Vulgar Latin open o (Q), under the accent in an open syllable, breaks to the diphthong t&. This shows for the 14 high back position of the tongue and for the a mid back position, while rounding of the lips or labialisation occurs for both. It is obvious...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 87–91.
Published: 01 March 1943
.... Hartmann hat umgekehrt einen entsprechenden lateinischen Text, der bereits den stark moralisch-theologischen Einschlag hatte, als Quelle benutzt.” The chapter dealing with the meter keeps within traditional lines based on the assumption that the MHG word accent was identi- cal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 241–242.
Published: 01 June 1946
... to editors of old texts. Gillet adopts the modern system. This often requires an accent on a y, which presents a queer appearance, neither old nor new. I am puzzled by a form like dhndo’s. The accent is evidently due to the analogy to dhdose, but in the present case the meter clearly shows the word...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (4): 405–412.
Published: 01 December 1967
... of a given experience is always as good as conditions allow: “good” here implies that the organization is simple, complete, regular, symmetrical, closedS8 And since the iamb is characterized most by its sense of “lift” or “rising,” caused by the location of the accent at the end, it seems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 242–244.
Published: 01 June 1946
... be applied only in dealing with Tinellaria and Aquilam, where sueltas enter into con- sideration. He wisely adopts the modern system of capitalization and punctuation. Accentuation offers more of a problem to editors of old texts. Gillet adopts the modern system. This often requires an accent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (1): 33–42.
Published: 01 March 1958
... for the poetry of sense that Dryden’s couplet performs for the poetry of wit and intellect. It is functional in every sense. Thus the high percentage of unaccented or weakly accented syl- lables in the passage combines with grammar and even the denota- tion of such words as dazzling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 102–103.
Published: 01 March 1967
... secondary accents, caesuras, ant1 occasional run-on lines, apparently implying that in some 0th author 102 THOMAS MONTGOMERY 103 the accents are all absolutely fixed. He insists, further, that the rhymes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 331–332.
Published: 01 June 1941
... to write “something without accent.” Remembering that in old chronicles “the martyrdoms of the saints are no more dwelt upon than are the trivial incidents of their lives,” she made it her aim “not to hold the note, not to use an incident for all there is in it-but to touch and pass...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 332–333.
Published: 01 June 1941
... Cather was telling us some years ago, she tried to write “something without accent.” Remembering that in old chronicles “the martyrdoms of the saints are no more dwelt upon than are the trivial incidents of their lives,” she made it her aim “not to hold the note, not to use an incident...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 643–644.
Published: 01 December 1941
... and the fall of final -m as “probably connected with the stress- accent.” This may be so because even during the Classic Latin period, stress was probably not entirely lacking even though met- rics were based on quantity and pitch, but there are many lines of Virgil that cannot be scanned...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 234–235.
Published: 01 June 1951
..., the most natural, the gentlest, and the most encompassing in his appeal, of all those who had stamped comedy with the manners of the age.” Still there are some things we wish Connely either had or had not done. The accent on mistresses is far too pronounced; the developing illness, which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (4): 350–351.
Published: 01 December 1957
..., but the contented acceptance of a given condition freely expressed (p. 346). Although the accent is on the late and latest Rilke, illuminating reference is continually made to the earlier works or stages. The analysis of the concept of “survival” (Aushalten, Ertragen, Oberstehcn, and Bestehen...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 562–564.
Published: 01 December 1990
... of the available material for a contemporary audience. As regards Goethe he does just this-with accuracy, sympathy, good sense, and just admiration without adulation. Every biographer will set the accents differently, but in this first half of Goethe's life even the accents are set in surprisingly- almost...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (2): 196–198.
Published: 01 June 1976
... im- agery” (p. 28), “the vibrating or cumulative movement characteristic of the work” (p. lS9), “heavy Latin accents” (p. 35), “heavily accented and alliter- ated English phrases” (p. 123), “the dramatic momentum gradually recedes as confession swells” (p. 13l), “the pounding rhythms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (3): 379–381.
Published: 01 September 1948
... in der deutschen Lyrik), and others. The essence of free verse is, negatively, the abandonment of rhyme and meter ; by meter is meant the definite scheme of recurrent beats, the consistent arrangement of accented and unaccented syllables in metrical feet, thus forming a pattern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 219–227.
Published: 01 June 1944
... normal phonological evolution into O.F. entir. C.L. words which were accented on the antepenult and which had an occlusive consonant followed by r at the beginning of the last syllable regu- larly shifted the accent to the penult in V.L.l : C.L. integrum > V.L. entkgru > O.F. entir through...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (3): 345–362.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., was to flood the second install- ment of his Faerie Queene (1596) with feminine rhymes.1 These are rhymes, of course, in which the accent travels back from its normal position at the end of the line and the rhyme extends to follow it. This is an example from the second installment: Do thou dred...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 281–313.
Published: 01 September 2021
... lured the spring ; the impossibility of finding an alliterative translation for Lenz , so that spring disappoints the ear; and the general problem of resounding Wagner’s short, accentual lines in English. It is easier to arrange unaccented words between accented words in German because of the way...
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