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Sherlock Holmes

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 85–90.
Published: 01 March 1947
... the career of any writer in the last half century; from every walk of life and from all over the world, his readers forced him back to the construction of stories based on sheer plot. For the creator of Sherlock Holmes, there could be no escape from this. As Doyle observed, “[Holmes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (4): 491–525.
Published: 01 December 2020
... intersect. A Study in Scarlet , the novella that introduced Sherlock Holmes, offers the first meditation on distant reading. A split double plot that anticipates generic fissures within crime fiction broadly conceived, A Study in Scarlet creates a data-centric detective intelligence in dialogue with late...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (1): 207–228.
Published: 01 March 2000
... brought to my graduate seminar about twenty detective stories of Conan Doyle’s times; we combed them for clues, and the results are 7 On the significance of clues see Victor Shklovsky, “Sherlock Holmes and the Mystery Story,” in Theory of Prose, trans...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 370.
Published: 01 September 1946
... Wilde and Sherlock Holmes on the one hand, of Henley and Bulldog Drum- mond on the other, and of the mingling of both in Kipling. For Kip- ling at school was an aesthete just as naturally as he was later an apostle of energy. One observes the same phenomenon in Tennyson, who wavers always...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (3): 387–390.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, Levay’s second practitioner of “modernist detection” (26). More detached than Dupin, Holmes indulges in sensory distractions merely to fortify his machine-like processes of analysis. The chapter is rounded out with Dorothy L. Sayers’s amateur sleuth, the eccentric...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (3): 397–399.
Published: 01 September 2015
....) The Sherlock Holmes fantasy that a near-omniscient detective can uncover people’s inner thoughts through endless study of their appearances remains impossible; at the other extreme from Arthur Conan Doyle is Walt Whitman’s determination in his poetry to keep people at a distance, blessing them only from afar...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 368–370.
Published: 01 September 1946
.... Buckley’s analysis of his materials has been too superficial to discover the basic unity between the attitudes of Oscar Wilde and Sherlock Holmes on the one hand, of Henley and Bulldog Drum- mond on the other, and of the mingling of both in Kipling. For Kip- ling at school was an aesthete just...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... of Literature” appeared (2000), he had arrived at a question that might be empirically tested: why did Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories survive their many competitors in the Strand magazine in the 1880s? Moretti proposes that it was because Doyle developed the clue in its canonical form: a clue...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (2): 83–116.
Published: 01 June 2001
...” rooms also destabilize the relationship of figure to interior, man to possession. The Sherlock Holmes stories by Conan Doyle, in comparison with Collins, meditate on the interior in relatively calm, rational terms. Pri- vate interiors are repeatedly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (1): 3–22.
Published: 01 March 1989
... to be fully satiified by being asked to murmur “Shylock” when they come to the lines about the “man that hath no music in himself” (V.i.83), and are not going to accord more than lip service to the notion that the absence of Shylock (rather like the silence of the dog in the Sherlock Holmes story...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (4): 437–459.
Published: 01 December 2008
... or Shakespeare’s Malcolm we know all vices in ourselves or that like Sherlock Holmes we catch the criminal because we have only to look in the mirror to know what he would do, but even in the face of the pieties about other minds that all of us do try to honor as a matter of civility, we still navigate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (2): 203–226.
Published: 01 June 2018
... calculation: 5×30=150 quarters=500£ 3×40=120 quarters= 250£          Total 750£ This calculation immediately recalls a scene in which Oak deciphers, like a cryptographer or Sherlock Holmes, a set of tracks left by a horse and carriage; the manuscript version even includes five figures representing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 193–217.
Published: 01 June 2020
... representation of reality. But the employment of Flaubertian notions as defense speaks to their influence, even if they were mishandled or improperly defined. In the year that Tess appeared, Sherlock Holmes, attempting to downplay Watson’s praise at the end of “The Red-Headed League,” quotes a letter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 259–262.
Published: 01 June 2011
...”; Paul Virilio comes in second, by a hair. Marc Augé’s idea of “non-­place” comes in third, and even after pages of summary one may remain unconvinced that the non-­place of “supermodernity” (71; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 262–265.
Published: 01 June 2011
...; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside the private home (75). Duffy’s point is that the home is “emplaced” in nineteenth-­ and twentieth-­century literature (74) and yet came to be regarded with suspicion, as Anthony Vidler argues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 266–268.
Published: 01 June 2011
...; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside the private home (75). Duffy’s point is that the home is “emplaced” in nineteenth-­ and twentieth-­century literature (74) and yet came to be regarded with suspicion, as Anthony Vidler argues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 269–272.
Published: 01 June 2011
...”; Paul Virilio comes in second, by a hair. Marc Augé’s idea of “non-­place” comes in third, and even after pages of summary one may remain unconvinced that the non-­place of “supermodernity” (71; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 272–276.
Published: 01 June 2011
...; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside the private home (75). Duffy’s point is that the home is “emplaced” in nineteenth-­ and twentieth-­century literature (74) and yet came to be regarded with suspicion, as Anthony Vidler argues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 253–255.
Published: 01 June 2011
...”; Paul Virilio comes in second, by a hair. Marc Augé’s idea of “non-­place” comes in third, and even after pages of summary one may remain unconvinced that the non-­place of “supermodernity” (71; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 256–259.
Published: 01 June 2011
...”; Paul Virilio comes in second, by a hair. Marc Augé’s idea of “non-­place” comes in third, and even after pages of summary one may remain unconvinced that the non-­place of “supermodernity” (71; this term also is Augé’s) is a useful way into Sherlock Holmes’s suspicion of what goes on inside...