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Geoffrey Chaucer

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 246–247.
Published: 01 June 1950
...: Simon and Schuster, 1948. Pp. xxix + 345. $2.95. The recent appearance, in Professor R. M. Lumiansky’s idiomatic translation, of early England’s greatest poet, Geoffrey Chaucer, should inspire a large part of the literate American public to read, perhaps for the first time...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 147–159.
Published: 01 June 1970
... that we have read them here as spoken by Geoffrey Chaucer. The effect of Chaucer’s artifice is to turn our attention from the story of Troilus and Criseyde, which is not finished, to the person who is telling us the story. We listen to the narrator draw from the story a meaning that does not seem...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 422–424.
Published: 01 December 1952
.... With Introduction, Notes, and Glossary. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1952. Pp. x + 302. $4.50. Levin, Harry. The Overreacher : A Study of Christopher Marlowe. Cambridge : Harvard University Press, 1952. Pp. xiii + 204. $4.00. Lumiansky, R. M. Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (4): 309–312.
Published: 01 December 1957
...: , , . The Second Part. . . , p. 337. ‘ Sir Geoffrey *Chaucer our renowned Poet, writes tnicch to the sanie efcct ‘[against the Lordlinesse and wealth of Bishops and Priests]. [right margin] *The Plowmans Tale [Pt. 11, lines 693-699; Pt. 111, lines 701- 7081 312 Chaucer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 473–498.
Published: 01 December 2016
..., centered on alliterative verse, explore what is distinctive about the cultural work of early English poetics. Copyright © 2016 by University of Washington 2016 alliterative verse Geoffrey Chaucer meter poetics prosody Since the sixteenth century, the history of English poetics has had two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 360–362.
Published: 01 December 1955
...,” the poet Geoffrey Chaucer was praised (in Caxton’s words) as “the first foundeur and enbelisher of ornate eloquence in englissh . . . making the sayd langage ornate and fayr. which shal endure perpetuelly” (p. 6, n. 10; cf. also pp. 26 f., 30, 84 f., 168). Professor Jones suggests that (1...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 245–246.
Published: 01 June 1950
... of Spain. GEORGEW. UMPHREY University of Warhington The Canterbury Tales of Geoflrey Chaucer: A New Modem English Prose Translation, Together with the Original Middle English Text of the General Prologue and the Nun’s Priest’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 510–512.
Published: 01 December 1948
.... (translator). The Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer. A New Modern Prose Translation. Together with the Original Middle English Text of the General Prologue and the Nun’s Priest’s Tale. Preface by Mark Van Doren and Illustrations by H. Lawrence Hoffman. New York: Simon and Schuster...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (4): 515–517.
Published: 01 December 2015
... not—with “premodern” writers from the century before: John Lydgate, William Caxton, the great medieval chroniclers, and the followers of Geoffrey Chaucer. The mechanism that drives Kuskin’s new literary history is “recursion,” “a trope of return that produces representation through embedded self-reference” (9...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (3): 235–249.
Published: 01 September 1985
... that Chaucer endeav- ored to portray Boethian consolation in the narrative. A. C. Spear- 1 In The Legend @Good Women Chaucer himself calls The Book of the Duchess “the Deeth of Blaunche the Duchesse” (F 418). All quotations from Chaucer’s works are from The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. F. N...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 61–65.
Published: 01 March 1963
...- vidual figures in the passage, turning them into metaphors of cosmic, rather than temporal, desolation. And it offers the poet an opportunity 1All quotations are from F. N. Robinson, ed., Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer (Boston, 1933). 2 Ibid., p. 946. 61...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 259–264.
Published: 01 September 1946
..., 1929). Here and elsewhere I use italics to aid the reader. 3 See, for example, W. W. Skeat, ed., The Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, 2nd ed., V (Oxford, 1900)’ 175; J. M. Manly, ed., Canterbury Tales by Geofrey Chaucer (New York, 1928), p. 625; Robinson, op, cit., p. 840; G. H...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 107–111.
Published: 01 March 1976
...). Charles Dickens: The Public Readings. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975. lxix + 486 pp. f15.00; $39.00. Economou, George D. (editor). Geoffrey Chaucer: A Collection of Original Articles. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975. xi 4- 148 pp. $2.45, paper. Erskine-Hill, Howard. The Social Milieu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (3): 219–226.
Published: 01 September 1981
... Classical Library ed. (Cam- bridge: Harvard University Press, 1954), p. 189; and “Poetria Nova” of Geoffrey of Vinsauf, trans. Margaret F. Nims (Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1967),p. 19. 2 See, for example, Jill Mann, Chaucer and Medzeval Estates Satire: The Literature...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (3): 257–273.
Published: 01 September 1972
... is in a curious way profoundly religious A Reading of the “Canterbury Tales” (Cambridge, 1968), p. 124. Ruggiers suggests a relation- ship between the Wife’s “total performance” and the philosophical doctrine of plenitude (pp. 198-200). Cf. J. L. Lowes, Geoffrey Chaucer (Oxford, 1934), p. 187;Curry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 233–239.
Published: 01 June 1964
.... Dobrke, Bonamy, and J. W. Robinson (editors). British Writers and Their Work. No. 1: Nevi11 Coghill, “Geoffrey Chaucer”; M. C. Bradbrook, “Sir Thomas Malory.” No. 2: Maurice Cranston, “John Stuart Mill”; Kenneth Allott, “Matthew Arnold”; William Irvine, “Thomas Henry Huxley.” Lincoln...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (1): 3–14.
Published: 01 March 1978
... transmitted by Boethius, for whom the “devyne substaunce” is a “forme” (Boece, See Boece, Book 3, meter 2, and Manciple’s Tale, lines 163-74 and 187-95, in The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. F. N. Robinson, 2nd ed. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1957). On this subject see my “Medieval Monism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 298–307.
Published: 01 September 1970
...), pp. 83-105. 3 Quotations from Chaucer are from the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. F. N. Robin- son, 2nd ed. (Boston, 1957). 298 RODNEY DELASANTA 299 themselves for judgment-albeit of a variety ironically...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (2): 173–204.
Published: 01 June 2017
... Chaucer’s “Knight’s Tale,” a 1570 edition of Euclid’s Elements , and a 1585 commentary on the Song of Solomon. In the vast majority of the ninety-one texts printed between 1473 and 1600 in which twoo and two appear within six words of one another, the orthographic variation seems wholly irrelevant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (3): 259–271.
Published: 01 September 1964
... pages. 2 The Prologue is obvious. For the Parson’s Prologue, see the statement, “Now lakketh us no tales mo than oon.” Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. F. N. Robinson (Cambridge, Mass., 1957), X(1).16. Subsequent references will be to this edition and will be cited in the text...