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English poetics

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 473–498.
Published: 01 December 2016
...Eric Weiskott Abstract Since the sixteenth century, the history of English poetics has had two sides: a history of theory and a history of practice. Contemporary literary scholars are mapping new connections between the history of theory and the history of practice, under the rubric of “historical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (4): 339–343.
Published: 01 December 1959
...Robert D. Stevick Copyright © 1959 by Duke University Press 1959 EMENDATION OF OLD ENGLISH POETIC TEXTS BE 0 W ULF 2523 By ROBERTD. STEVICK A fair fight between scholars is usually interesting, sometimes salutary. Allan Orrick’s recent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (3): 341–344.
Published: 01 September 1991
...Peter Sacks Joshua Scodel. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1991. 432 pp. $45.00. Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 REVIEWS The English Poetic Epitaph: Comnwmmation and ConJictfiomJonson to Wmdswmth. By JOSHUA SCODEL.Ithaca, N.Y...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (2): 265–267.
Published: 01 June 1999
...Thomas Pfau R. Marks Emerson. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1998. 413 pp. $44.95 cloth, $21.95 paper. Copyright © 1999 by Duke University Press 1999 Taming the Chaos: English Poetic Dicrion Theory since Ihe Renaissance. By Emer- son R. Marks. Detroit: Wayne State University...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (3): 233–259.
Published: 01 September 2019
.... The syllogism is connected to early modern art forms that Enlightenment critics considered excessively complicated or absurdly confusing. Focusing on the emergence of baroque logic in Neo-Latin rhetoric and English poetics, this article traces the development of increasingly outlandish rhetorical practices...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 139–167.
Published: 01 June 2020
... the prophetic-poetic text as “strong”: artful, controlled, ordered, and balanced. He responded to an anxiety about the place of the Bible and biblical prophecy in eighteenth-century English society by disavowing or minimizing the irregularities, stutters, and fissures in prophecy. But by introducing prophecy...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (2): 149–170.
Published: 01 June 2014
...Heather Murray W. J. Alexander, trained at London and Johns Hopkins and appointed in 1889 by the University of Toronto as one of the first dedicated professors of English literature in Canada, was well positioned to direct the new discipline of English literary studies across the country and at all...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 March 2020
... in Early Modern English Literature and Culture . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Fox Cora . 2009 . Ovid and the Politics of Emotion in Elizabethan England . New York : Palgrave Macmillan . Freccero John . 1975 . “ The Fig Tree and the Laurel: Petrarch’s Poetics...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (4): 427–452.
Published: 01 December 2019
... formations— poésie mondiale in French, poesía mundial in Spanish, and world poetry in English—but also highlights kindred trajectories in non-Western languages, such as sheʿr-e jahān in Persian and shiʿr fi al-ʿalam in Arabic. Corroborating Édouard Glissant’s claim that “the amassing of commonplaces...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 321–344.
Published: 01 September 2016
... of English Literature locate a “poetic revolution” in “the years leading up to World War I” (Greenblatt et al. 2006 : 1834). It appeared in any case likely that poetic diction would be different in 1915 than it had been in 1850, and possible even that prestige would be generated in 1915 precisely...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 1–4.
Published: 01 March 1992
... of the English (Chaucerian) poetic literary tradition. Such innovation is (he argues) most significant in terms of the role Lydgate annexes for the poet, the role of establishment spokesman in a variety of ways, a role that Lydgate seems to have steadily followed in all his major works. He sees...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 374–375.
Published: 01 September 1950
... which is almost entirely modern in its diction into an old-fashioned, less alive text. But it is probably demanding too much to expect a translator to make full use of modern English poetic diction which is, after all, still in the making. Professor August Closs of Bristol University...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 231–234.
Published: 01 June 1945
... have had excellent reasons for the omissions and inclusions here listed. There is one larger omission, however, which looms more con- spicuously in this sketch of Old English poetic art. Professor Ken- nedy does not touch upon the various types of evidence pointing to Celtic, especially...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
...” (p. 24). Byron’s immediate motivations for English Bards were Brougham’s splenetic unsigned review of Hours of Idleness and his (Byron’s) antipathy toward the poetry of the new radicals who, he believed, were betraying their roles as guardians of English poetic tradition and elevating...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 443–446.
Published: 01 December 1986
...” (p. 24). Byron’s immediate motivations for English Bards were Brougham’s splenetic unsigned review of Hours of Idleness and his (Byron’s) antipathy toward the poetry of the new radicals who, he believed, were betraying their roles as guardians of English poetic tradition and elevating...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 5–22.
Published: 01 March 1992
... thought himself the wiser. A third example of Lydgate’s ambitious attempt to build an English poetic tradition by “fortifymg” (in Dryden’s sense) preliminary struc- tures thrown up by Chaucer is The Fall ofPrinces.5 The immediate model is the Monk’s Tale, an eerily appropriate premonition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (4): 518–520.
Published: 01 December 1950
... in A Tale of a Tub. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1950. Pp. xix + 159. $3.00. Thorpe, James (editor). Rochester’s Poems on Several Occasions. Princeton : Princeton Studies in English, No. 30, 1950. Pp. xxxviii + 196. $5.00. Warren, Alba H., Jr. English Poetic Theory, 1825-1865...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (3): 356–363.
Published: 01 September 1949
... existing trends and traditions. Seeing himself as the Chaucer of his time, Spenser aspired to fit to the body of the English language the rather loose but living elements of the poetic forms he found about him. This language stabilized and became his own only after he had culled its elements...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (3): 378–379.
Published: 01 September 1967
... that there is a disarming charm in this opening sentence and a certain charm, too, in the old-fashioned, pre-Critical (pre-New Crit- ical, pre-Anatomy of Criticism) quality of the book. But make no mistake: Sisam, the redoubtable hero of, eg., “The Authority of Old English Poetical Manuscripts” (RES, XXII, 1946...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (3): 289–318.
Published: 01 September 2020
... of that address, especially if the poem is in print. One critic from whom I first learned this basic principle of poetics was Fry himself. Fry opens his great book The Poet’s Calling in the English Ode with some strong sentences about Allen Tate’s 1938 essay “Narcissus as Narcissus,” in which Tate wrote...