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Desire under the Elms

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (1): 51–76.
Published: 01 March 2017
...Alexander Pettit Abstract During an eleven-year period that began in 1913 with the composition of his first play, Eugene O’Neill repeatedly experimented with New Comic forms. His seven “metacomedies” from this period—most focally Bread and Butter , “Anna Christie,” and Desire under the Elms —render...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 211–213.
Published: 01 June 1963
...- tive of time, acquit themselves well, committing only occasional aberrations (cg., Percy Hammond’s comment that Desire Under the Elms is a play of “bitter despair But these were the eminent critics of their day: Joseph Wood Krutch, T. S. Eliot, Ludwig Lewisohn, Alexander Woollcott. We...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 209–211.
Published: 01 June 1963
... of the journalistic criticism generally. By and large these reviewers, in the perspec- tive of time, acquit themselves well, committing only occasional aberrations (cg., Percy Hammond’s comment that Desire Under the Elms is a play of “bitter despair But these were the eminent critics of their day...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (2): 145–171.
Published: 01 June 2018
...) and which therefore contains these under itself, not within itself.” From these two comments it may follow that for Kant human thinking is always poised for experience of the sublime that will be awakened by a particular representation. 26 In the “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” Thomas...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 205–208.
Published: 01 June 1943
... of the ivy-symbol for which I do not find explicit classical authority. By the Renaissance, if not before, the accepted use of Bacchus’ name as a metonymy for self-indul- gence made easy the wider application of the ivy-symbol to include desire in its more fleshly aspects. The ill...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 547–572.
Published: 01 December 2016
... End “isn’t the place that would fetch one of your artistic crew,” a set keen on small holdings, “back to the land—ah! philanthropic bunkum!” (165). Seen this way, Leonard and Helen’s intercourse and child are correlated to her desire for “back to the land” and what it represents. Moments before...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of the real historical completion. They thus run the risk of stranding these survivals in an organic landscape that is only an illusory object of the desiring gaze: a nostalgic recreation; an enactment. The following reading of The Woodlanders takes up these contradictions. It is framed by two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 79–88.
Published: 01 March 1944
... for disliking Philips and for despising his verse; this part of the case will be examined in the paragraphs immediately following. The third objection, that The Shepherd’s Week, apart from some few incidental gibes, does not carry sufficient internal evidence of a desire to bur- lesque Philips, can...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 71–86.
Published: 01 March 1943
... the Old World . . . had taught us.”26 Like Higginson in his admission that the old stock of English literature is “flourishing here under brighter suns,” Hoppin also admirably re- flects the post-war desire for a “true American literature” which should be permeated with the “peculiar...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (2): 91–107.
Published: 01 June 1986
.... Segal’s interpretation of Plautus relies on the affective theory of farce, which has been neatly outlined by Eric Bentley. In “The Psychology of Farce,”6 Bentley explains how farce allows us to see our repressed desires acted out on stage. Its relationship to the real world is like...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 189–203.
Published: 01 June 1946
... other, or scem rather to render it the most pleasant of their products; being placcd under the most benign climate in the world, and situated exactly between Italy and Greece, it appears an entire epitome of all the pleasures in them both.* And she floods the stories with the conventional stage...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 376–389.
Published: 01 December 1975
..., for contemporary land- scape poetry, though often confused philosophically, is in visual terms an easy, lucid, coherent affair. The descriptive poetry of the late cen- tury leads the eye on an orderly tour of a scene appealing in its pastoral and Gothic variety under the control of painterly techniques...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (3): 251–279.
Published: 01 September 1994
... of lovers released from all human qualities What is the origin of this modern, technologically assisted beauty contest, in which multiple, anonymous female contestants sit before male judges? Is the obsession with fixing beauty as old as human desire and the inevitable encounter with death...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 605–608.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Protestants about the consequences of the schism with Rome, and he contends that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 609–612.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Protestants about the consequences of the schism with Rome, and he contends that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 612–615.
Published: 01 December 2004
... themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way players sought to edify through foolery, arguing that they self-consciously appropri- ated the preachers’ role, understood as a “‘holy cozenage1 and explored...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 616–618.
Published: 01 December 2004
... contends that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way players sought to edify through foolery, arguing that they self...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 618–621.
Published: 01 December 2004
... the consequences of the schism with Rome, and he contends that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way players sought to edify...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 621–624.
Published: 01 December 2004
... contends that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way players sought to edify through foolery, arguing that they self...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 624–627.
Published: 01 December 2004
... that these plays depict a fellowship of rogues—associated with theater people themselves— as “a rough foretype” of a desired “supranational Christian society” (86). In part 2, “Church and Theater,” Knapp examines the way players sought to edify through foolery, arguing that they self-consciously appropri...