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Charlotte Smith

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (4): 457–474.
Published: 01 December 1997
... in 1994. She is currently puzzling over simulations of orality, framing, and canon formation in early written fairy tales. “Out in Left Field”: Charlotte Smith’s Prefaces, Bourdieu’s Categories, and the Public Sphere Elizabeth W. Harries The writing is nothing, the being...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly 11060495.
Published: 12 February 2024
... stage in their history to recover their forgotten political significance. Working across four central cases (Samuel Richardson’s “man of feeling” Sir Charles Grandison, Charlotte Smith’s self-effacing protagonist Lionel Desmond, Walter Scott’s “mediocre heroes,” and Jane Austen’s “creepmouse” heroine...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (3): 381–385.
Published: 01 September 2023
... to cultural history for a deeper understanding of and potential responses to what Menely and others have called “the Anthropocene predicament.” By retelling the story of blank-verse description from John Milton to William Wordsworth and Charlotte Smith, Menely portrays a gradual disruption of poetic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 377–392.
Published: 01 December 2001
... but several, the other side of the coin is the tendency to fragmen- tation: one critic is a specialist in the novel; one writes only on poetry. Writers such as Charlotte Smith, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Mary Robin- son all worked in more than one genre, yet most criticism treats...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (2): 251–254.
Published: 01 June 2016
... of commemoration that admits the inevitability of forgetting and that seeks to preserve not what has been lost, but rather its remembered image” (14). Sentimental Memorials devotes chapters to Sophia Lee, Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson, writers Sodeman describes as “now well and truly part...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (2): 270–273.
Published: 01 June 1998
... sufficiently evocative of modernist criti- cism to make his revisionary claim credible. Moreover, by providing read- ings of authors now reemerging after long critical neglect (from Charlotte Smith to Felicia Hemans) and others still largely unknown (such as Ann Batten Cristall, in the riveting final...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2024) 85 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 March 2024
... of Islam and Prometheus Unbound ; five in a few of Coleridge’s and Keats’s lyrics; and six in the novels of Radcliffe, Charlotte Smith, and Austen. Because poems offer “an occasion for questioning, wandering, and wondering” (159), they perfectly encapsulate a progressive style that can accommodate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 495–525.
Published: 01 December 2009
... (1812) or of Charlotte Smith’s Desmond (1792) would have found in Waverley a name already well “occupied.” Both novels feature characters sharing not just Waverley’s name but also his domi- nant traits of character: “Desmond’s light-headed charge and travel Gamer Object of (Literary) History...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 393–406.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., a middle-class Quaker woman, and a working-class freed African slave woman. In Charlotte Smith’s Old Manor House the hero is saved only through the goodwill of a Native American chief. In Esme Erskine’s epic Alcon Malanzor the interracial, interfaith marriage...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (2): 266–270.
Published: 01 June 1998
... Smith to Felicia Hemans) and others still largely unknown (such as Ann Batten Cristall, in the riveting final chapter), McGann complements his recent anthology, The New Oxfwd Book of Romantic Period Vmse, making avail- able not only neglected poems but also ways of understanding them. In ear...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (4): 471–500.
Published: 01 December 2002
... to their beds,” as Claudia L. Johnson puts it.14 Reformed rakes deploy similar strategies. In Charlotte Smith’s Emmeline (1788), Adelina’s 11 George Starr, “‘Only a Boy’: Notes on Sentimental Novels,” in The English Novel, ed. Richard Kroll (London: Longman, 1998), 29–54. 12 The Man of Feeling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (3): 219–238.
Published: 01 September 2001
..., this abode of wretchedness and despair, had now fallen.” Cowper was delighted to read of Fox’s speech in the newspaper (Poems, 2:402). When Charlotte Smith dedicated The Emigrants to Cowper a year later, she allied herself with him by conjoining political and emotional...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 633–643.
Published: 01 December 1996
... their days in debt and destitu- tion. Even so prolific a writer as Charlotte Smith, who published ten multivolume novels in as many years, earned only &150 to &zoo a year-barely enough to support her children. Yet for all its focus on the economics of women’s lives, economic history...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (2): 308–314.
Published: 01 June 1969
... & Noble, 1969. xxx 4- 332 pp. $8.00. Doyle, John Robert, Jr. William Plomer. New York: Twayne, WAS 54, 1969. xiv + 183 pp. Doyle, Paul A. Sean O’FaoZain. New York: Twayne, TEAS 70, 1968. 156 pp. Ehrenpreis, Anne Henry (editor). Charlotte Smith: “The Old Manor House.” London, New...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 537–542.
Published: 01 December 2011
... argues convincingly that women writers used the ambiguity of words like work to contest and reconfigure a gendered division of labor, slippages in meaning require vigi- lance from her readers. The first three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 542–545.
Published: 01 December 2011
... three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Wollstonecraft — whose careers Batchelor correlates loosely with a shift in conceptions of authorship and work. Thus in the first chapter she notes that during the mid-­eighteenth century “a perceived...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 545–548.
Published: 01 December 2011
... argues convincingly that women writers used the ambiguity of words like work to contest and reconfigure a gendered division of labor, slippages in meaning require vigi- lance from her readers. The first three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 549–552.
Published: 01 December 2011
... three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Wollstonecraft — whose careers Batchelor correlates loosely with a shift in conceptions of authorship and work. Thus in the first chapter she notes that during the mid-­eighteenth century “a perceived...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 552–555.
Published: 01 December 2011
... argues convincingly that women writers used the ambiguity of words like work to contest and reconfigure a gendered division of labor, slippages in meaning require vigi- lance from her readers. The first three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 556–558.
Published: 01 December 2011
... argues convincingly that women writers used the ambiguity of words like work to contest and reconfigure a gendered division of labor, slippages in meaning require vigi- lance from her readers. The first three chapters each focus on one of a group of authors — Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith...