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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (1): 1–28.
Published: 01 March 2014
...? ” Scottish Literary Review 2 , no. 1 : 159 – 69 . Wordsworth William Coleridge Samuel Taylor . 1969 . Lyrical Ballads , edited by Owen W. J. B. . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Robert Burns and Big Data; or, Pests of Quantity and Visualization Matthew Wickman...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (1): 95–124.
Published: 01 March 2020
.... “ Distant Reading for European Literary History .” www.cost.eu/actions/CA16204/#tabs|Name:overview . Crawford Kate , Miltner Kate , and Gray Mary L. . 2014 . “ Critiquing Big Data: Politics, Ethics, Epistemology .” International Journal of Communication 8 : 1663 – 72 . ijoc.org...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 277–295.
Published: 01 September 2016
... characterized as “distant reading,” an approach that seemed to bring literary studies (kicking and screaming) into the age of “big data,” its human-scale canons of masterworks subsumed into digitized corpora containing tens or hundreds of thousands of texts. A “crisis of largeness,” then: literary studies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (4): 491–525.
Published: 01 December 2020
..., and Shane Vogel. Copyright © 2020 by University of Washington 2020 genre Big Data artificial intelligence Sherlock Holmes distant reading We live in an era that presumes Big Data to be the solution to all our problems. . . . But data are profoundly dumb. . . . They can’t tell you why...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (4): 567–577.
Published: 01 December 2020
... and canons, big data will always, at the very least, lag behind actual human reading. Our arguments about the correctness of calling something a detective novel will not be settled by data. In Goodlad’s account, “The key to genre’s success . . . is its invocation of rules that cannot be enforced: a paradox...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (1): 77–106.
Published: 01 March 2017
....” Where interpretation and observation are “anecdotal and speculative,” “big data” is supposedly separate from human involvement and thus offers “comprehensive and definitive” historical facts (31). According to Jockers, literary scholars “have the equivalent of big data in the form of big [digital...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (4): 532–537.
Published: 01 December 2021
...-Romantic. A follow-up chart pictures the rise of unconsciously at the start of the nineteenth century, apparently at insensibly ’s expense. This use of big data obscures more than it reveals. Insensibly was in currency from the mid-sixteenth century forward and had meanings ranging from the funereal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... of canon formation. Another literary critic working inside the paradigms of “normal science” might have spent many more years trying to work out the kinks in the particular model of cultural selection. Moretti simply moved on to big data (more accurately, in much of his practice, moderate data), which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (4): 581–589.
Published: 01 December 2016
...—that is, construct it as an object of knowledge—only by giving up the fetish of close reading and instead practicing distant reading. In these same recent years Moretti was also exploring what he called “abstract models for a literary history” (Moretti 2005 ) and launching big-data experiments in the Stanford...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (2): 272–276.
Published: 01 June 2016
... hundred years. So we are offered one extended example of big-data findings that show why it is fruitless to periodize. This graph shows “the differentiation of diction in three genres” across two centuries (1700–1899). The graph shows widening gaps between the dictions of poetry, prose fiction...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 395–418.
Published: 01 September 2016
...=581 . Piper Andrew , and Portelance Eva . 2016 . “ How Cultural Capital Works: Prizewinning Novels, Bestsellers, and the Time of Reading .” Post45 , May 10 . Schöch Christof . 2013 . “ Big? Smart? Clean? Messy? Data in the Humanities .” Journal of Digital Humanities 2...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (3): 291–299.
Published: 01 September 2017
... of “big data” has further exposed the limitations of traditional archives (among them the exclusive rare book collections at elite libraries), on which the specificity of historicist interpretation was grounded. Thick descriptions of events, institutions, and “speech acts” fail to account for the striking...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 297–319.
Published: 01 September 2016
.... Given that Mimesis made Auerbach the hero of literary criticism that he remains to this day, it would seem that as a discipline we like to champion David but keep Goliath, too, to toggle between the telling example and big data. In addition to its virtuosic handling of scale, Mimesis may owe its...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (3): 269–288.
Published: 01 September 2018
... history of thousands of years? If so, does it have practical statistics to support itself? If not, it will be hard to convince others of its validity, and although it might be popular for a while, this could never last. Still, in this connection, big data and cloud computing give grounds for optimism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (4): 527–552.
Published: 01 December 2020
...; it finds support also in the renewed emphasis on description in anthropology, geography, sociology, and big-data analysis, among others. The new descriptivism in literary studies is broadly interdisciplinary in its sources yet resolutely discipline-specific in its aims. It wants a new way for handling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 447–471.
Published: 01 September 2016
... literary entertainment. 2 Although it is difficult to find exact data, it would appear that more than a million texts have been self-published via KDP and that hundreds of them have sold hundreds of thousands of copies (Amazon 2013 ). KDP works in tandem with the hard-copy print-on-demand platform...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (3): 321–344.
Published: 01 September 2016
... find some pattern in a finite data set. Although a correlation between language and reception might look strong, it could be largely accidental; in effect, the algorithm has only “memorized” the quirks of particular examples. To test a model more rigorously, we have to use it to make predictions about...
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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 393–399.
Published: 01 September 2021
... the analog humanities—that allows us to move freely and productively between the big domains of data or the high abstractions of theory, on the one hand, and the minute semiologies of text, figure, and word, on the other. It is where our overlapping skills as specialists, as archivists, as exegetes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 188–190.
Published: 01 June 1987
... that her book “is intended to supply the need for a modern scholarly biography” (p. ix). 1 am sad to report that she has succeeded in only a part of that intention-she has written a decent biography, but it will not meet the needs of the scholar. She has gathered Herford and Simpson’s data...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 411–413.
Published: 01 December 1977
... of “linguistic data.” He mixes sorrow and anger with a touch of sarcasm: There is no reason to suppose that critics of Pinter are alone in ignoring recent advances in the understanding of the logic of language, so there is clearly some obstacle that has prevented the by no means...