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Algernon Charles Swinburne

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (4): 397–419.
Published: 01 December 2018
... performance Alfred Lord Tennyson Algernon Charles Swinburne The awarding of a Nobel Prize in Literature to a songwriter-poet raises the question of my title. 1 When literary historians and theorists discuss musical songs, we usually refer to song’s lyrics (plural), amputated from the music, lest...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (4): 419–443.
Published: 01 December 1998
... close parallel to his Rustavelian epic in Algernon Charles Swinburne’stranslation of the Arthurian tale Balin; or; the Knight with the Two Swords. Swinburne (1837-1909) and Bal’mont (1867-1942) are neoromantic rhapsodes or modern troubadours, kindred virtuosos of highly euphonious, elab...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (2): 197–200.
Published: 01 June 1982
... of Bodleian MSS Digby 133 and E Museo 160. Oxford: Oxford University Press, for the Early English Text Society, EETS, o.s., 283, 1982. cx + 284 pp. $35.00. Beasley, Jerry C. Novels of the 1740s. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1982. xviii + 238 pp. $18.00. Beetz, Kirk H. Algernon Charles...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 281–313.
Published: 01 September 2021
... in the 1890s . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Swift James . 1872a . “ The London Wagner Society .” Orchestra , March 8 , 362 – 63 . Swift James . 1872b . “ The Wagner-Ventilation .” Orchestra , April 12 , 25 – 26 . Swinburne Algernon Charles . 1886 . “ La Mort de...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 325–331.
Published: 01 September 1950
... and tyrannise over us, creatures whom we would not forget if we could, creatures whom we could not forget if we would, creatures who are more actual than the man who made them.”22 Especially laudatory is the following tribute from Algernon Charles Swinburne, who follows his usual practice...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 621–626.
Published: 01 December 1965
.... Brewster, Dorothy. Doris Lessing. New York: Twayne Publishers, TEAS 21, 1965. 173 pp. $3.50. British Writers and Their Work. No. 7: Oswald Doughty, “Dante Gabriel Ros- setti”; Philip Henderson, “William Morris”; H. J. C. Grierson, “Algernon Charles Swinburne.” No. 8: Sergio Baldi, “Sir...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (1): 41–63.
Published: 01 March 2016
... of lamentation. The inimitability particularly of the opening of “Lycidas” was asserted by Algernon Charles Swinburne, who avowed in characteristically wild hyperbole that with “Adonais” and “Thyrsis” the poem “eclipse[s] and efface[s] all the elegiac poetry we know; all of Italian, all of Greek.” Milton’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 March 2012
... accurate depictions of human suffering at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Yet the long- recognized ghostliness of these gures iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 98–101.
Published: 01 March 2012
... of human suffering at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Yet the long- recognized ghostliness of these gures iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 101–104.
Published: 01 March 2012
... iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express the “virtual life” of commodities and the impossibility of fully grasping their logic 1 To get at his inher- ently...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 2012
... iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express the “virtual life” of commodities and the impossibility of fully grasping their logic 1 To get at his inher- ently...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 108–112.
Published: 01 March 2012
... of human suffering at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Yet the long- recognized ghostliness of these gures iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 112–114.
Published: 01 March 2012
... accurate depictions of human suffering at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Yet the long- recognized ghostliness of these gures iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2012
... of human suffering at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Yet the long- recognized ghostliness of these gures iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 117–121.
Published: 01 March 2012
... iterates the Wordsworthian “something unspoken and something undone” remarked by Algernon Charles Swinburne, theorized by Geoffrey Hartman and Paul de Man, and here taken to express the “virtual life” of commodities and the impossibility of fully grasping their logic 1 To get at his inher- ently...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2013
... negation and affirmation was part of his bequest to the three successor poets discussed in Tucker Review 119 the second half of Keirstead’s book. Algernon Charles Swinburne’s practice of a foreignized or denatured translation between...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 March 2013
... half of Keirstead’s book. Algernon Charles Swinburne’s practice of a foreignized or denatured translation between tongues was of a piece with the deliberate perversity of congress between bodies that Poems and Ballads imagined so exuberantly, and to such Victorian scandal. The transgressive...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 121–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to the three successor poets discussed in Tucker Review 119 the second half of Keirstead’s book. Algernon Charles Swinburne’s practice of a foreignized or denatured translation between tongues was of a piece with the deliberate perversity of congress...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 126–129.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to the three successor poets discussed in Tucker Review 119 the second half of Keirstead’s book. Algernon Charles Swinburne’s practice of a foreignized or denatured translation between tongues was of a piece with the deliberate perversity of congress...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 129–132.
Published: 01 March 2013
... half of Keirstead’s book. Algernon Charles Swinburne’s practice of a foreignized or denatured translation between tongues was of a piece with the deliberate perversity of congress between bodies that Poems and Ballads imagined so exuberantly, and to such Victorian scandal. The transgressive...