This fascinating study features seventy-five dense pages of magisterial endnotes, followed by a thorough index and copious acknowledgments. These paratexts leave no doubt about the project’s deep roots and careful cultivation in a richly supportive ecosystem of early modern and contemporary sources. The main text is in five chapters, cleft into three parts; the first two parts conclude with separate case studies, and the last ends with an epilogue. In its prolific self-segmentation, this volume takes a page out of its own sources: the composite early modern “plant books” identified here as a genre characteristic of the period. These are not, to be clear, necessarily books about plants, although herbals, husbandry manuals, and horticultural handbooks are among those plumbed. Instead, Jessica Rosenberg’s study centers on the poetics of books that figure themselves in titles and paratexts as bowers and bouquets and so on, and thus identify as the hallmark forms...

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