When scholars of premodern critical race studies no longer have to make the case that race was a social and material construct in the early modern period, they are free to ask and answer different, more compelling questions. In her expansive study, Scripts of Blackness, Noémie Ndiaye queries the transnational circulation of racial discourses in early modern performance traditions and the interconnected ways in which those discourses operated to produce racialized blackness. Ndiaye takes her cue from a personal experience of being asked to inhabit and perform stereotypical blackness for a white interlocutor: an incident in which a white acting teacher casually instructed her to “blacken up” as a means to access the Africanness of her character. From this entry point, Ndiaye explores the many and varied scripts of blackness that determine the contours, protocols, and comportment of black, African life within white, European culture. Throughout Scripts of Blackness...

You do not currently have access to this content.