In Poetry, Print, and the Making of Postcolonial Literature, Nathan Suhr-Sytsma uncovers a startling set of interlocking relationships among poets from Nigeria, Ireland, the Caribbean, and multiracial postwar Britain during the period of midcentury decolonization (1950s–1970s). In the past decade or so, scholars have emphasized the cross-cultural constitution of postcolonial poetry and poetics, often emphasizing how social realities become refracted through aesthetic strategies of language and form (e.g., Crawford 1992; Hena 2015; Hunter 2019; Patke 2006; Ramazani 2001, 2009; Stilling 2018). Similarly attentive to poetry’s formal repertoires, Suhr-Sytsma charts a pathbreaking study in poetry criticism and in postcolonial literary studies more broadly. By foregrounding the medium of print and on-the-ground institutional networks mediating poetic production, circulation, and reception, he masterfully navigates how such nonmetropolitan poets as Christopher Okigbo, Tony Harrison, Seamus Heaney, and Derek Walcott, among a host of others, productively operate...

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