Posthumanism is poised to arrive full force in eighteenth-century and Romantic studies, and these three books present themselves as part of that coming wave. At the same time, the books seem to participate in a new movement within ecological criticism, which has broadened recently to embrace a wide range of poststructuralist, postmodern, and other theory, including here approaches such as Jacques Derrida’s late animal turn and Michel Foucault’s idea of biopower. Yet despite their apparent overlap in subject matter and theoretical orientation, the three books prove vastly different in their approaches. Most significantly for the future of posthuman and ecological criticism, they differ greatly in the degree to which they uncenter the human and situate systems of human language and aesthetic form within a material, biological, and more-than-human world.

Tobias Menely’s Animal Claim makes the nonhuman or “creaturely” voice central to its...

You do not currently have access to this content.