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Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 16 (2): 363–372.
Published: 01 March 2018
... digital self-care practices. ERIN L. BERRY-MCCREA "To My Girls in Therapy, See Imma Tell You This fo Free . . ."1: Black Millennial Women Speaking Truth to Power in and across the Digital Landscape Abstract This paper describes the ways that Black millennial women have come to acknowledge the role ofvoice...
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Published: 01 September 2018
Figure 3. Can You See Me? Loíza, Puerto Rico, 2016. © Welmo E. Romero Joseph. More
Journal Article
Meridians (2002) 3 (1): 161–190.
Published: 01 September 2002
...Terry Kawashima ESSAY Seeing Faces, Making Races Challenging Visu:ilTropes of Racial Difference TERRY KAWASHIMA When mostfore(gnerslookat man.gafor thefirst time today and seecharacterswith hu.gesaucereyes,lanky le.gs,and whatappears to beblondehair,they oftenwantto know why thereare so many...
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 2. Bilquis sees Frederico dancing on the rooftop. More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 4. Frederico sees Bilquis on her wedding night. More
Journal Article
Meridians (2016) 13 (2): 79–98.
Published: 01 March 2016
...Ina C. Seethaler Abstract Jane Jeong Trenka's adoption memoir received harsh criticism for its negative stance against transnational adoption. Within a small yet growing group of life-writing works on transnational adoption, I see Trenka as an important voice in challenging the dominant cultural...
Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 16 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 September 2018
.../and” rather than “either/or” (see Crenshaw 1989, 1991; Collins 1991). But in contemporary feminist critiques of intersectionality, it is frequently misrepresented, portrayed as fixed when it is fluid and flexible, and accused of creating the very categories and social relations it exposes and challenges. Few...
Journal Article
Meridians (2022) 21 (1): 158–184.
Published: 01 April 2022
... a clear statement about her values and where she sees herself fitting in Dominican society. Drawn from three separate interviews conducted with Fortuna in Santo Domingo in July 2016, augmented by her extensive internet archive, this article frames a transcribed and translated testimonio that captures some...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Meridians (2016) 13 (2): 28–55.
Published: 01 March 2016
... in which the racist, patriarchal society in which they are raised and are living denies them and their mothers the ability to see themselves and each other as full subjects. Furthermore, locating Morrison's novel of female friendship alongside debates regarding whether feminist initiatives should favor...
Journal Article
Meridians (2010) 10 (1): 137–163.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Samantha Pinto Abstract “Why must all girls want to be flag women?” laments one critic regarding what he sees as the infiltration of “Carnival” culture into the performative desires of Indo-Trinidadian women. The intersections of soca, a form of music derived from the traditional Carnival genre...
Journal Article
Meridians (2014) 12 (1): 201–207.
Published: 01 March 2014
...Julietta Hua Abstract Human trafficking has gained attention world-wide, and stories about victimization and violence help to define the so-called underground activities of trafficking. Rather than ask what counts as an instance of human trafficking, this essay considers how we come to see one...
Journal Article
Meridians (2019) 18 (1): 152–160.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Tina Hernandez Abstract This narrative, creative nonfiction piece is implicitly about epigenetics and explicitly about the oral tradition among multigenerational women in the author’s Cuban American family. How we see ourselves and each other is explored literally and metaphorically. Copyright ©...
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 11. “Birth Control for the Negro,” report by Hazel Moore, 1937. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 1 [3 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 14. “Planned Parenthood,” a pamphlet distributed by the Division of Negro Service to black community leaders, with obvious appeal to men and their family responsibilities. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 3 [8 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 20. Better Health for 13,000,000 , Planned Parenthood Federation of America report on the two-year initiative in African American communities, 1943. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 8 [32 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 18. Letter from Margaret Sanger to Florence Rose, in which she expresses frustration with “the medical way” of distributing birth control, February 10, 1940. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 6 [2 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 27. Speech about Planned Parenthood by E. Mae McCarroll, M.D., delivered to nurses at Harlem Hospital, October 22, 1942. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 10 [6 pp., p. 2 not included].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 33. The 1938 Mississippi Health Project . Fourth Annual Report of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, December 1938. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Health Committee. Miscellaneous Organizations Collection, SSC. (See Supplement 11 [23 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 12. “Possible Results of Project,” a list of potential outcomes of a Negro Service program, which Margaret Sanger compiled for inclusion in a funding proposal to Albert Lasker, circa 1939. Florence Rose Papers, SSC. (See Supplement 2 [2 pp.].) More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 25. National Leaders Agree—Planned Parenthood Means Better Families , brochure featuring black leaders’ endorsements of birth control, undated. Planned Parenthood Federation of America Records (PPFA I), SSC. (See Supplement 9 [4 pp.].) More