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Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 261–292.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Mireille Miller-Young Abstract Hip-hop pornography propels the conventions of the nearly soft-core hip-hop video to the extreme, the explicit, the hard-core. The convergence of the outlaw cultures of hip-hop and pornography offers a compelling narrative about how black sexual subjects define...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 19–52.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Whitney A. Peoples Abstract This essay seeks to explore the sociopolitical objectives of hip-hop feminism, to address the generational ruptures that those very objectives reveal, and to explore the practical and theoretical qualities that second- and third-wave generations of black feminists have...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 74–92.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Anaya McMurray Abstract “Black Muslim women and hip-hop? . . . real Muslims don't listen to hip-hop.” For many it is almost unfathomable that black Muslim women would have any involvement with hip-hop music. While several scholars have explored the connections between hip-hop and Islam, hip-hop...
Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 17 (2): 383–400.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Msia Kibona Clark Abstract Women hip hop artists in Africa have created spaces for themselves within hip hop’s (hyper)masculine culture. They have created these spaces in order to craft their own narratives around gender and sexuality and to challenge existing narratives. This research uses African...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 September 2008
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 15–18.
Published: 01 September 2008
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Andreana Clay Abstract Examinations of the relationship of queer sexuality and the hip-hop generation have recently emerged in academia. However, little or no work has been done that explores hip-hop's bisexual, independent poster child, Me'Shell Ndegeocello. Since her debut in 1993, Ndegeocello's...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 205–210.
Published: 01 September 2008
... sell not only hip-hop culture, but also the very image of its women. They serve as eye candy designed to satisfy an assumed male video audience, affirming critiques of the culture as hyper-masculine and misogynist. “Still” is a series of photographs from contemporary rap music videos. These artworks...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 180–204.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Daphne A. Brooks Abstract This essay explores the critical work of Beyoncé's second solo recording, and places it in conversation with yet another under-theorized yet equally dissonant R&B performance by her “hip-hop soul queen” contemporary Mary J. Blige. In relation to both Beyoncé's...
Journal Article
Meridians (2008) 8 (1): 130–143.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Habana, Las Krudas borrow from shared diasporic resources (hip-hop culture/rap music, African drum rhythms and chants) when fashioning a musical aesthetic that allows for the articulation of the “local” as well as the “global.” Finally, I move beyond Foucault's spatial model of disciplinary power...
Journal Article
Meridians (2020) 19 (S1): 166–168.
Published: 01 December 2020
... I would hunt a tree down for you, stalk it until it fell all loud and out of breath in the forest. Much as I love a tree, fat, tall and free. As anti-violent and pro-vegetarian as I am. Never been much for strapping a gun to any of my many hips, for any reason whatsoever...
Journal Article
Meridians (2020) 19 (S1): 439–462.
Published: 01 December 2020
...” is the centerpiece of her hip-hop feminism (Morgan 1995 , 152), Gwendolyn Pough argues that the labor of contemporary Black feminism should be articulating a “message of self-love” (Pough 2003 , 241), and bell hooks reminds us that “all the great movements for social justice in our society have strongly emphasized...
Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 17 (1): 97–106.
Published: 01 September 2018
... good or pretty, because he looks like Ken. We are not Ken! We are black people, with wide hips, we are not Barbies! Women are not, we, AfroCaribbean women, are women with wide hips and wide arms because we have been working a lot our whole lives and our African legacy is not from skinny, lean, or pale...
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Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 17 (2): 219–231.
Published: 01 November 2018
... space of artistic and activist expression around the African continent. Msia Kibona Clark’s essay “Feminisms in African Hip Hop” extends a growing corpus of critical work on this powerful cultural form. The essay maps the complex relation of female artists to masculine dominance within hip hop and also...
Journal Article
Meridians (2020) 19 (S1): 508–512.
Published: 01 December 2020
... of Domestic Workers, the Black Lesbian National Seminar, and the National Front for Women in Hip Hop, the Marcha sought to reach out to all Black women involved in all sorts of social change efforts in an exceptionally wide range of places and spaces, urban and rural, governmental, religious, trade union...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Meridians (2019) 18 (1): 152–160.
Published: 01 April 2019
... was six weeks pregnant with a secret nobody knew. She said, “I know what our bodies look like.” Small waists, flat-rounded bellies, and a pair of hips just like two battleships. Annette and Laura and I, we loved it at Ma and Pa’s. Everyone loved it at Ma and Pa’s. We were so spoiled. At Ma and Pa’s...
Journal Article
Meridians (2018) 17 (1): 49–50.
Published: 01 September 2018
... a shield. Did you know Coltrane invented hide and seek? When lost, he peels away the veils and masks, looks inward and finds you. If you choose to abandon the game, he lurks in the thighs, and plays with your hips. Soon, everyone wants to join in. ...
Journal Article
Meridians (2020) 19 (S1): 255–278.
Published: 01 December 2020
...” of Blige, the “Queen of Hip-Hop Soul.” Indeed, while many heaped praise on rapper-producer Kanye West for his skill at social agitation and for reminding the nation of just what George Bush thought of Black people, less public note was made of what was perhaps the most provocative performance aired...
Journal Article
Meridians (2020) 19 (S1): 155–165.
Published: 01 December 2020
... generation is totally different,” he adds. “Young people are saying they’d rather go to jail, or to the army and risk getting killed. And their anger is coming out in hip hop.” In 1986, Sarah White was the mother of a four-year-old son. Going into the army, selling crack, or rapping were not options...
Journal Article
Meridians (2021) 20 (1): 229–245.
Published: 01 April 2021
... anyway. Outside Cheyenne, the Festiva shivered in the wake of passing semis. I didn’t argue—much. Geneva and her friend wanted to listen to a hip-hop and R&B station out of Denver. I couldn’t win a soundtrack fight, even with friends as backup, even with S’s killer mixtape—Hendrix laced...