transnational feminism, Central American women, Latin America, U.S. intervention

In the spring of 1981, public opinion polls revealed that a vast majority of North Americans overwhelmingly opposed the Reagan administration’s military response to revolutionary activity in Central America (LaFeber 1984: 4). This came mere months after Ronald Reagan had run as a presidential candidate on a platform that cautioned against a Marxist Sandinista takeover of Nicaragua, which seemingly threatened neighboring El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (LaFeber 1984: 1). In response to the increasing levels of violence by U.S. military–funded death squads, a multitude of antiwar organizations and collectives emerged throughout the United States. Many of these groups organized solidarity trips to the Central American isthmus. One of these included the delegation’s trip Somos Hermanas (We Are Sisters), which formed out of the preexisting Alliance Against Women’s Oppression as a...

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