1-20 of 27 Search Results for

slave

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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (1): 74–92.
Published: 01 March 2011
... contributes to conditions that are fueling the conflict: foreign administrative control (slave trade and colonialism) of the Niger Delta, which is alien to the indigenous people; the presence of lucrative commodities (oil, palm oil, and timber); and the Niger Delta people's resistance to exploitation...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (4): 1–9.
Published: 01 December 2009
... inequality and the dehumanization of a race. The state delegates to the convention did not agree on the meaning of “all men” or the definition of “property.” To put it differently, they did not agree on where the black slaves fit in their scheme: 4  Mediterranean Quarterly: Fall 2009...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (3): 4–33.
Published: 01 September 2012
... improvements. In fact, the war was caused by the South’s fear that it would lose the dis- proportionate representation provided by “slave power.” Odiously, slaves were designated as three-­fifths persons for the purpose of determining how many votes their masters would control in the US House...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (4): 112–130.
Published: 01 December 2007
... and traditional elements the key to the success of the kingdom. The Ottoman Empire annexed Sudan in 1821. The Turco-Egyptian regime developed a centralized administrative system in modern-day Khar- toum, allowing for slaves and other exploited goods from the periphery to be shipped northward...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (3): 75–94.
Published: 01 September 2004
... for the worship of slaves, and in fact not even honest slaves but crimi- nals. The monks would collect bones and skulls of criminals, declared them to be those of Christian martyrs, and would force the people to venerate them. The monks called the dead criminals ambassadors to the new gods.15 An American...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2013) 24 (4): 19–42.
Published: 01 December 2013
... between Ottoman Turkey and Spain, the people of the Maghreb traded peacefully with the peo- ple of Europe.25 The notion that North Africa was home to nothing but sand and pirates is untrue.26 Slaves, dates, olives, fish, and cloth flowed north; the region’s Berber horses were prized particularly.27...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2003) 14 (3): 86–111.
Published: 01 September 2003
... as for world dominion. With the capture of Constantinople in 1453, Islam finally triumphed. The Orthodox Christians of the Middle East, North Africa, Asia Minor, the Balkans, Greece, and Cyprus became slaves to the sultans, the representatives of Allah on earth, when they were not slaughtered in the name...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (4): 27–32.
Published: 01 December 2001
... their name and their religion. Then there is the issue of slavery. The government has done nothing to stop it. In fact, it is quietly supporting it. Slave traders from the north regu- larly sweep down into villages destabilized by fighting and kidnap women...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (1): 97–106.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., but Jesus had nothing to do with princes or revolution. The Christians, nevertheless, made Jesus, a secretive, untrust- worthy sorcerer, into a god. . . . Christian teachers sought their converts among slaves, women, children and fools. This was no accident but a consistent policy because they feared...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., a secretive, untrust- worthy sorcerer, into a god. . . . Christian teachers sought their converts among slaves, women, children and fools. This was no accident but a consistent policy because they feared educated people. They considered science and learning dangerous and evil, and thought of knowledge...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (2): 77–94.
Published: 01 June 2009
... was followed by evictions of Chagossians, also known as Ilois, by the British government, mainly to Mauritius and Seychelles from 1967 to 1973. It has been reported that “the UK paid Mauritius 4 mil- lion pounds to relocate the Chagossians.”63 Chagossians are descendants of African slaves and Indians...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (2): 107–109.
Published: 01 June 2012
...: “Catholic France . . . followed the flag of Islam, the flag of pirates and slave merchants.” On the basis of a painstaking and systematic analysis of French and Ottoman diplomatic documents, travelogues, and other surviving sources, the author succeeds in exposing the bias and fallacy of traditional...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (2): 110–111.
Published: 01 June 2012
...: “Catholic France . . . followed the flag of Islam, the flag of pirates and slave merchants.” On the basis of a painstaking and systematic analysis of French and Ottoman diplomatic documents, travelogues, and other surviving sources, the author succeeds in exposing the bias and fallacy of traditional...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (2): 111–114.
Published: 01 June 2012
... and slave merchants.” On the basis of a painstaking and systematic analysis of French and Ottoman diplomatic documents, travelogues, and other surviving sources, the author succeeds in exposing the bias and fallacy of traditional accounts of Ottoman-­Western relations. They were by no means...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (2): 37–60.
Published: 01 June 2007
... Syria. He called Prime Minister Sinyora “the hired slave of a hired slave,” the latter being Saad al-Hariri.19 Such pronouncements were viewed in Beirut as death threats. On 12 Decem- ber 2005, the same day Mehlis submitted his second report to the UN secretary-general, a bomb blast...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (3): 55–67.
Published: 01 September 2008
... the prisoners of Athens, but the whole male population of Mitylene, and to make slaves of the women and children.” The ensuing debate has a very contemporary feel in 62  Mediterranean Quarterly: Summer 2008 light of events during the occupation of Iraq. The words of Diodotus narrowly carried the day...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (3): 12–23.
Published: 01 September 2004
... sheep; and whereas God did not create the people slaves to their prince, to obey his commands, whether right or wrong, but rather the prince for the sake of the subjects (without which he could be no prince), to govern them according to equity, to love and support them as a father his chil...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (4): 133–146.
Published: 01 December 2004
... it in its global context, many of the processes and underlying causes referred to are common to the forms of traffi cking worldwide. While traffi cking may be undertaken for a number of purposes such as slave labor, removal of organs, sexual exploitation, or prostitution, this article deals only...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (2): 84–87.
Published: 01 June 2011
... and eventual servitude in the administration and the household of the sultan) and the kul system (slaves and servants of the Ottoman dynasty) reveals the complex nature of power and politics within the Ottoman Empire’s reach. Peirce surmises that the most important element in Ottoman statecraft...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (2): 88–90.
Published: 01 June 2011
... and eventual servitude in the administration and the household of the sultan) and the kul system (slaves and servants of the Ottoman dynasty) reveals the complex nature of power and politics within the Ottoman Empire’s reach. Peirce surmises that the most important element in Ottoman statecraft...