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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2015) 26 (2): 115–127.
Published: 01 June 2015
... state that, during its brief existence between April 1941 and May 1945, subjected its minority Serbian population to genocide. In addition to many hundreds of thousands being killed or forcibly converted to Roman Catholicism (the religion of the Croats), many Serbs fled the territory of the NDH...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (3): 40–50.
Published: 01 September 2009
....” Applied to the Balkans in coming decades the ethnic Albanians now living in at least five Balkan states and the ethnic Serbs living in five states, as well, are developing growing kinship with their fellow nationals beyond the current frontiers and local allegiances that currently separate them. David...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 March 2011
...Robert J. Pranger Looking back on Yugoslavia's break-up and the subsequent warfare involving Bosnian Muslims, Croats, Albanians (Kosovars), and Serbs, two constants seem fundamental over the past two decades: Slobodan Milosevic and the ascension of Islam to independent statehood. Most academic...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (3): 47–56.
Published: 01 September 2001
... served by supporting the Partisans. In 1945, Churchill admitted that his Yugoslav decision was one of the biggest mistakes in the war, while the Serbs felt betrayed. Nevertheless, U.S. support for Yugoslavia was never in doubt, and U.S.- Serbian...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (2): 48–52.
Published: 01 June 2006
... Yugoslav army facilities in their republic. Because the media usually blamed the Serbs for the civil wars, it is impor- tant to note that at the time of the secessions the Yugoslav government was almost totally in the hands of non-Serbs. The prime minister was Ante Mar­ covic, a Croat...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (3): 43–54.
Published: 01 September 2006
... on the territory of the Bosniak- Croat Federation. The demographic changes in the cities of Sarajevo, Tuzla, Livno, and Mostar show that most of the Serbs have moved out of these cities. The question remains: Should they take their icons with them? I am going to focus on the problem of cultural...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (4): 120–122.
Published: 01 December 2001
... and diplomats new to the Balkans repeatedly voiced frustration—and anger—over encounters with Serbs who answered their first questions with a “lecture” on the historic tribulations of their nation. Whether highly placed officials, ordinary cit- izens, or soldiers...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (4): 122–124.
Published: 01 December 2001
... journalists and diplomats new to the Balkans repeatedly voiced frustration—and anger—over encounters with Serbs who answered their first questions with a “lecture” on the historic tribulations of their nation. Whether highly placed officials, ordinary cit- izens...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (4): 124–128.
Published: 01 December 2001
... and diplomats new to the Balkans repeatedly voiced frustration—and anger—over encounters with Serbs who answered their first questions with a “lecture” on the historic tribulations of their nation. Whether highly placed officials, ordinary cit- izens, or soldiers...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 June 2000
.... For example, MEC functionar- ies chastised journalists for using the “rhetorical jargon of war” in their news accounts. References to the “Bosnian Serb entity” or the “Muslim- Croat federation” rather than focusing on Bosnia-Herzegovina as a nation were...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2005) 16 (4): 65–76.
Published: 01 December 2005
..., and Izetbegovic apparently had gambled that the international community would send a peacekeeping force. But when it didn’t, a civil war broke out almost immediately, with Bosnian Serb and Yugoslav army forces taking control of large areas of Bosnia. Subsequently, Izetbe- govic took refuge in a besieged...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (1): 11–21.
Published: 01 March 2001
...- pendent Kosovo and an independent Montenegro for the region. They feared, rightly, that such a scenario could encourage Greater Albania irredentism. They also were concerned lest it reinforce the urge of Bosnian Serbs to cleave to the motherland, unraveling...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2013) 24 (2): 39–58.
Published: 01 June 2013
... by the Yugoslav federal army through 1998) 4. The breakaway Republic of Serbian Krajina’s war (1991 – 92, after pro- claiming independence from Croatia and taking Serb-­inhabited areas of Bosanska Krajina, Srem, and Slavonia until a ceasefire) 5.  The Serbian/federal army occupation...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (1): 15–30.
Published: 01 March 2009
... of the Blackbirds. The Serbs lost to the Ottomans back in 1389, but Serbs seem to glory in their defeats more than their victo- ries. A lot has happened in the Balkans in the succeeding six centuries, most of it eminently forgettable even by residents there. However, the Ottoman Empire ultimately was ousted...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2011) 22 (3): 10–25.
Published: 01 September 2011
... of Yugoslavia began early and continued throughout the 1990s. It operated on both a macro and a micro level, with a distinct target — the Serbs. At the macro level, US and European officials, the Western news media, ethnic lobbies, and much of the foreign policy community spun a Manichean melodrama...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (4): 81–90.
Published: 01 December 2008
...” and “far-right.” Among these were many former colleagues of mine from the New York Times. I recall one of them musing aloud circa 1992 about how to dub a Bosnian Serb leader, saying: “I could call him ‘an extreme nationalist.’ No, how about ‘ultranationalist.’ That’s even better!” Indeed, he...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (3): 62–86.
Published: 01 September 2000
... and Croatia. Incessant media reports of more than two hundred thousand civilians killed gave rise to charges of genocide, mainly against the Bosnian Serbs. The large-scale uprooting of minorities from the emerging Serbian, Muslim, and Croatian enclaves led...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (1): 49–54.
Published: 01 March 2000
... already swept millions of Croats, Serbs, and Muslims out of their homes. Now, two wars later, the United States is participating in the international equivalent of annual charity drives: a “donors conference” for Kosovo recov- ery, held in Brussels...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (3): 100–115.
Published: 01 September 2000
... earlier with indifference to peace because of the aid it had received during the war: While Bosnian Serb interest in NATO has mainly to do with military calculations, the Muslims [Bosniaks] gain both economically and mili- tarily from NATO’s...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (1): 39–50.
Published: 01 March 2001
... military forces in Operation Storm, which ethnically cleansed all of the Serbs from their ancestral lands in Croatia and included the slaughter of hundreds of innocent civilians, has not been indicted. This is the same com- mander whose Croatian forces two years...