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montenegrin

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Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2007) 18 (3): 72–93.
Published: 01 September 2007
... and every Allied government gave me a decoration — even Montenegro, little Montenegro down by the Adriatic Sea.  — F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby The postcommunist period in Montenegrin political life can be divided into two phases. The first multiparty...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2013) 24 (2): 39–58.
Published: 01 June 2013
....” The appearance of a post – World War II communist-­conceived “Macedo- nian language” was attributed to an American linguist and other wordsmiths doctoring the “Serbian alphabet in order to claim an alleged ‘Montenegrin’ ethnic distinction.”9 Bosnian Muslims have lately added more Islamic terms...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2004) 15 (4): 115–124.
Published: 01 December 2004
... of Montene- gro. There I discovered its “Vlach church” dating from 1450, making it the oldest building in the town. Purportedly constructed by Vlach shepherds, the church was surrounded by a fence made of rifl e barrels. A Montenegrin explained to me that this commemorated the doughty Vlach warriors who...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2017) 28 (4): 14–31.
Published: 01 December 2017
... main goals recognizes that Montenegro does not face 14. Boro Vucinic, “Montenegro, NATO, and a New State’s Security. Partnerships: How Are They Changing?” NATO Review 8 (2008), www.nato.int/docu/review/2008/08/MONTENEGRO_STATE _SECURITY/EN/index.htm. 15. Montenegrin government official...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (1): 11–21.
Published: 01 March 2001
... commission” on the South African model begun in 1996 or perhaps trials in Serbia. Further, he immediately made conciliatory gestures in the Montenegrin capital of Podgarica to Djukanovic, in Sarajevo to the Bosnian Muslim and Croatian leaders, and in Skopje...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2001) 12 (2): 66–82.
Published: 01 June 2001
... by the Montenegrin general Boshko Boshkovic and in a humiliating cere- mony signed the surrender instruments for both provinces. Matters got far worse for Albanian rulers in the interwar period. Within a few years following Albania’s conditional admission to the League...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (2): 138–141.
Published: 01 June 2009
..., and the Slavic elements, Serbian and Montenegrin, who saw no choice but to emigrate. The future looked grim. Whatever government was in power would find it difficult to govern. The final chapter, “To Be or Not to Be,” is dated June, 1991. Viewing the possible disintegration of Yugoslavia, the author...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (2): 141–144.
Published: 01 June 2009
..., and the Slavic elements, Serbian and Montenegrin, who saw no choice but to emigrate. The future looked grim. Whatever government was in power would find it difficult to govern. The final chapter, “To Be or Not to Be,” is dated June, 1991. Viewing the possible disintegration of Yugoslavia, the author...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2013) 24 (2): 59–80.
Published: 01 June 2013
...- nition of the independence of the breakaway republics of Slovenia and Croa- tia and their brokering of Montenegrin independence) and direct (military intervention by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1999). The late twentieth century “Balkan” wars were, in fact, foundational in the develop...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2014) 25 (4): 5–26.
Published: 01 December 2014
... a system of concentration camps to which at least 110,000 Croatians, Slovenians, and Montenegrins were deported.10 In the case of the Slovenians, nearly 8 percent of the entire population ended up in camps. Greeks were also subject to deportation, mostly to the camp at the Greek city of Larissa...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (4): 81–90.
Published: 01 December 2008
...’ class struggle.”9 In fact, three years after the end of World War II, Tito and his closest aides — the Slovene Edvard Kardelj, the Serb Aleksandr Rankovic, and the Montenegrin Milovan Djilas — were creating a kind of supranationalism expressed in the unwieldy term Jugoslavenstvo — “ Yugoslavia...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2009) 20 (3): 40–50.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Albania, and then went north to the Montenegrin port of Ulcinj, where he was apprehended, after two weeks at large, as he prepared to travel to Brazil.) In the category of a soft-power dissolution of the borders separating Serbs, one should consider the following: • Republika Srpska Telekom...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (1): 136–140.
Published: 01 March 2000
.... Yet Liotta asserts that “Yugoslavia was a European nation with an identifiable geography and eth- nic composition. Croats, Serbs, Bosnians, Slovenes, Montenegrins, and Macedonians— all violent denials to the contrary acknowledged—are an ethnos (nation...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2000) 11 (1): 141–144.
Published: 01 March 2000
..., Bosnians, Slovenes, Montenegrins, and Macedonians— all violent denials to the contrary acknowledged—are an ethnos (nation); they are one ethnos. And Yugoslavia’s tribes lived far more peaceably together under the oppression of Marshal Tito than they have thus far...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2012) 23 (2): 95–106.
Published: 01 June 2012
... our willingness to help our institutions of collective security, such as NATO evolve in a new way that can meet the demands of the new age.”12 The next step was a naval blockade bottling up Serbian-­Montenegrin ship- ping. Operation Sharp Guard began in June 1993 after approval by NATO. 10...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2010) 21 (4): 7–18.
Published: 01 December 2010
..., it is no wonder that many still ask themselves whether Bosniaks, Serbs, Croats, Albanians, and Montenegrins are to one another the curse of the past or the blessing of the future. I strongly believe that the answer depends on us, on the noble readiness to forgive, on our capability to draw lessons from...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2005) 16 (3): 17–43.
Published: 01 September 2005
...’ unhappiness with their status in Montenegro is palpable; as an ICG report claims: “In general, many Albanians believe that the pre- vailing mentality of the Montenegrin government is deeply racist to Alba- nians and that there is no willingness at the governmental level to ensure that the Albanian...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2002) 13 (1): 21–37.
Published: 01 March 2002
...- Albanians. Not only was the Serbian minority a target, but some seventy thousand Roma (the so-called Gypsies) were driven out, as were thousands of Montenegrins, Bulgarians, Jews, and Macedonians. By the spring of 2000, more than 250,000 non-Albanians out of a prewar population of 350,000 were refugees...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2008) 19 (1): 63–79.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., Alba- nia merited something between a nod and a yawn from them. I booked a plane seat to the Montenegrin capital, Titograd, soon to revert to the name Podgorica, where I rented a car to drive the fifteen miles to the frontier at Han i Hoti (Inn of the Hoti Clan) and the ninety miles...
Journal Article
Mediterranean Quarterly (2006) 17 (4): 142–159.
Published: 01 December 2006
... were classified as a nationality or an extension of the Albanian peoples whose home state was Albania. Subsequently, when the Slovenians, along with the other peoples of Yugoslavia (Serbians, Croats, Montenegrins, and Macedonians) were given a legal home state or a Yugoslav republic, Tito also...